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Approved Minutes - 11-16-2018 Minutes 1.A fi 6� T 50+ ADVISORY BOARD MEETING n Friday, November 16, 2018 uP O 10:00— 11:30 a.m. GREGp� Lake Oswego Adult Community Center 505 "G" Avenue, Lake Oswego Contact: Pam Montoya,Administrative Assistant Email: pmontoya@ci.oswego.or.us Phone: 503-675-6407 Also published on the internet at: http://www.ci.oswego.or.us/boc fiftvplus The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.To request accommodations, please contact Pam Montoya at 503-675-6407,48 hours before the meeting. 1. Roll Call W. Poinsette/E. Halvorson-Hill 5 min Attendees: Willie Poinsette, Esther Halvorson-Hill, Lee Wicklund, Glenda Anderson, Robin McMilin, Janice Shokrian, Councilor Gudman Absent: Ann Adrian Guest: Maria Bigelow, ACC Program Supervisor 2. Approve Meeting Minutes—October 2018 W. Poinsette/E. Halvorson-Hill 5 min Lee Wicklund made a motion to approve the October meeting minutes. Glenda Anderson seconded the motion. October meeting minutes approved. 3. Open Public Communication 5 min The purpose of citizen comment is to allow citizens to present information or raise an issue regarding items not on the agenda. A time limit of five minutes per citizen shall apply. 4. Old Business 4.1 "The Event" Update G. Anderson/J. Shokrian 20 min (See attached) Board reviewed assignments and responsibilities. Event information to be distributed to churches, Chamber of Commerce and schools. May 14, 2019 chosen as date for the event. 4.2 2019 Proposed Board Goals All 20 min (See attachment) Board discussed draft of goals for 2019. Board agreed to drop goal #3, bus stops. Esther Halvorson-Hill, Co-Chair• Willie Poinsette, Co-Chair • Ronald Matthews Lee Wicklund • Robin McMilin • Glenda Anderson • Janice Shokrian Jeff Gudman, Council Liaison Page 2 Board agreed to add "The Event" Lake Oswego Celebrating Seniors, presented by the City of Lake Oswego, hosted by 50+Advisory Board as a goal for 2019. Lee Wicklund made a motion to approve the 2019 50+ goals, Glenda Anderson seconded the motion. 2019 goals approved, motion passed. 5. New Business 5.1 50+ Board Update W. Poinsette/E. Halvorson-Hill 10 min Board member Ronald Matthews resigned from the 50+ board as of October 29, 2018. Board alternate Ross Fearey asked to serve remaining term. Resolution has been prepared and will be presented for approval at the next City Council meeting being held on December 4, 2018. Distinguished Service Award to be presented to Ronald Matthews for his service on the board. 5.2 Housekeeping Items Board member Lee Wicklund requested that agenda be included on city website. Board member Lee Wicklund requested that the term "Open Public Communication" be changed on the agenda. Board member Lee Wicklund asked that an updated roster be provided to the board. 6. Staff Reports 6.1 City Council Update Councilor Gudman 10 min Council Gudman gave the board updates on the following topics; Bus stops and bus shelters located in Lake Oswego (see attachment). City Hall upgrade. Boones Ferry project. Lake Oswego Parks & Recreation survey and upcoming bond measures Metro transportation measure Clackamas County bond measures for county court house and vehicle registration fee. Approved a contract for work on County Club road. 6.2 ACC Update M. Bigelow 15 min Ann Adrian absent no update given. Maria Bigelow, ACC Program Supervisor gave an overview of her responsibilities at the ACC. Lee Wicklund made a motion to adjourn the meeting. Robin McMilin seconded the motion. Meeting adjourned at 11:30am Next Meeting on December 28, 2018 at Lake Oswego Adult Community Center. Prepared by, Pamela Montoya Administrative Assistant 503.635.0215 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.osweg DRAFT #2 "The Event" 50+ Advisory Board LO Community Celebrating Seniors Target date: May 14, 15 or 16, 2019 (Tues/Wed or Thurs) - need to select date! 9:00am-12:30pm Dunn Community Center Mary's Woods, Holy Names Drive, Lake Oswego, OR 97034 50+Advisory Board: Esther Halvorson-Hill, Willie Poinsette, Glenda Anderson, Ron Matthews, Robin McMilin, Janice Shokrian, Lee Wicklund Day of Event timeline 9:00-12:30 9:00 - Rolls, Coffee and Survey (Ann Adrian, to take lead) PRIZE? 9:30- 9:45 Welcome Esther + Willie 9:45- 10:10 Speaker Diane Hood 10:10- 10:30 Ruth Gulyas 10:30- 10:45 Mayor Studebaker Breakout Sessions 20 minutes (Select 3 sessions to attend; 5 minutes transition time) Need clear signs 10:50-11:10 11:15-11:35 11:40-12:00 12:00-12:30 Tours of Mary's Woods Community EVENT ends at 12:30 Breakout topics and Leaders- (confirmed speakers in bold) (meets 50+qoals in italics) 1. Home Health - Mary's 7. Transportation- shelters 14. Booktique - Ann Woods (Mayor's Office MO) Chilcoate 2. Lyft/Uber- Esther 8. Laughter/Humor/Mindful 15. Recycling Guidelines - 3. Financial Coach/Fraud ness, Gratitude Kevin Haberman MW - Alex Shokrian 9. Meals on Wheels maintenance, MO 4. Adult Community 10. Parks and Recs - 16. Home Livability - WLLO Center- Ann Adrian - Mayor's office MO 17. Therapy Garden - 5. Alexa technology - 11. Technology/commun.- Collette Rees Janice McGuire Mary's Jessica/Janice Mary's 18. Sustainability Emerg. Woods Woods Preparedness- Jan 6. Dementia/Loneliness - 12. Healthy Eating Castle - City Committee Lonely no more (Janet 13. Art Therapy Satterlee?) EVENT COMMITTEES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Event Chair, Janice Shokrian Committee: 50+ Advisory Board Members: Esther Halvorson-Hill, Willie Poinsette, Glenda Anderson, ACC Ann Adrian, To Do: 1. Budget participants to communication 2. Sponsorship agreements (Nov- committee for inclusion in Feb) program), (Nov-March) 3. Parking 7. oversight of Program and 4. Food (beverage/set up/clean up), Communication committees, 5. Tour coordination and sign needs Coordinate Greeters at event - 6. invite and coordinate with 50+ Board, LO Councilpeople, businesses for morning ACC, Mary's Woods coffee/table (give list of Program Committee/Break Out Session Committee - Robin McMilin, Chair To Do: 1. Coordinate with speakers 3. Give full speaker list with name, 2. Determine speakers' needs topic and time to communications (tables, handouts, amplification, committee for marketing. ensure signage for speakers, 4. create and print program - (end of etc), April early May) Communication Committee - Lee Wickland & Ron Mathews 1. Create printed invitation, (March) 5. work with LO Review for an article 2. craft VIP guest list, before the event and to send a reporter 3. Invite communities: Friends of Library, to event (March) Heritage House, Preservation Society, 6. make contact with Hello LO for an article etc in April edition 4. write press release 7. Write and send follow up thank you's VOLUNTEERS 1. Mary's Woods: Bob Dwyer, Judy Hammerstad, Cherri Musatto, Conyors, Jessica, Janice 2. Mayor's Office, 3. Kevin Christensen a. 503-753-4892 c b. 503-675-3033 c. kevinc@westgraph.com - break out session? Event Coordinator 4. Mary's Wood's Board of Directors 5, Council members of Lake Oswego Budget ITEM COST SOURCE SPONSOR Name Tags $ 25.00 Amazon 50 Table Tents $ 25.00 Amazon 50 Invitations $ 200.00 100 Programs $ 700.00 UPS 350, 4 pgs 350, 4 pgs Thank you's $ 50.00 Misc $ 200.00 TOTAL $1,200 Possible Sponsors: ACC Chamber of Commerce - interested in being a presenting sponsor Mayor's Office Mary's Woods Timeline: October - Receive 50+ Senior Board feedback/approval for event November - Committee commitment - who will do what, December - confirmation of speakers: 50+ Advisory Board, Mayor, City Council, Diane Hood + Ann Adrian Coordinate with Chamber of Commerce - Janice 50+ Advisory Board, Mayor, City Council, Diane Hood + Ann Adrian January - Finalization of number of breakout groups; invite Breakout Leaders and begin building printed program February Based on Budget - Save the Date card February (begin designing printed program and invitations) March Invitations - to boards, councilman LO Review and marketing no later than the end of March. April - confirm break out speakers, write program/print program May - first two weeks of May - name tags and table tents Considerations/Questions: 1. Are we addressing Diversity? 2. BUDGET - Can Mary's Woods/ACC and Chamber of Commerce or Mayor's office help with paper goods, printing and food (marketing/open house) 3. Name tags 4. Programs printed - ACC donation? 5. Table tents - printed - 6. 300 people - event is televised. 7. How much is Mayor going to promote this? 8. After January we can revisit the number of attendees. 9. other? Invitations: Who should we invite? Stafford all Senior facilities - Does Ann Adrian have a list of LO senior facilities? Rotary Club? Chamber of Commerce: Are there businesses that support the senior community? For example: large print menus, seating benches, home maintenance for seniors - If so, then invite these businesses to have a table at the event showcasing their business and services. THANK-YOU's O� E Iii DRAFT MEMORANDUM cilW) TO: Mayor Kent Studebaker, City of Lake Oswego Council Members FROM: Esther Halvorson-Hill & Willie Poinsette, Co-Chairs, 50+Advisory Board SUBJECT: 50+Advisory Board Goals for 2019 DATE: November 16, 2018 The 50+Advisory Board members met on MM/DD, 2018 and approved the following goals for 2019: 1. Work with the Lake Oswego Adult Community Center to develop outreach with older citizens who are aging in place. 2. "Lonely No More" Alleviate loneliness by arranging opportunities with young people to interact with older citizens. 3. Identify bus stops without shelters in Lake Oswego. 4. Plan and hold a senior educational event in Spring 2019. 503.675.3984 380 A Avenue PO BOX 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us The Value of Bus Shelters Transit is important. There are four Tri-Met routes in the city. They are 36 - South Shore, 37 - Lake Grove, 38 - Boones Ferry and 78 — Beaverton - Lake Oswego. According to Tri-Met there are about 170 stops in Lake Oswego. Of the approximately 170 stops, only ten have shelters. Of the ten shelters, Lake Oswego's Public Works department maintains eight and Tri-Met two. What can be done to encourage more riders cost-effectively? Expanding transit ridership is not just a Tri-Met issue. Local governments need to step up to the plate also. Encouraging more bus usage has benefits and costs. A relatively inexpensive solution is installing additional bus shelters. When it rains people waiting for the bus are getting soaked. Waiting in a dry place can encourage increased ridership. If Tri-Met design is used for bus shelters,jurisdictions can either pay or partner with Tri-Met for installation costs. What does it cost to install a bus shelter? Subject to right-of-way and topography, Tri- Met cost estimates for a pad and shelter is about $7,000 to $11,000. Assuming perfect conditions (unlikely for all stops) for each 160 uncovered bus stops, that is a range, depending on right of way and topography, of$1.1 million to $1.8 million. These are capital expenditure dollars and can be listed in the Capital Improvement Program (CIP). Then,the question becomes one of how to pay and where do shelters rank when weighed against other capital projects. Projects are listed in priority order because if everything is important, nothing is important. Trade-offs (if you do this, what won't you do) means we must consistently support infrastructure spending to ensure a high quality of life. Additional bus shelters add to the city's transportation capacity. Therefore, transportation System Development Charges (SDC's), dollars paid when development/redevelopment occurs, can be used. SDC's are incurred when development/redevelopment occurs there is additional requirements on the transportation system. Bus shelters will need to compete against all other transportation SDC eligible projects. Installing additional bus shelters is not the end of costs. Bus shelters must be maintained either by the city or Tri-Met. Having a bus shelter does not mean Tri-Met will automatically add more frequent buses to the city's routes. The general Tri-Met policy is when there is an increment of 50 or more daily riders on a route, Tri-Met can justify additional buses on a route. If operational funding is static, adding service is a zero-sum game. If service is added somewhere, service must be cut somewhere else. With additional revenue to the system, service can be added without cutting service elsewhere. There are gains to be had by doing boring things a little bit better. Boring is not the same as irrelevance. Spending money for infrastructure replacement/enhancement is harder " than finding cash for flashy new projects. Preserving day to day spending by reducing maintenance/investment, even when doing so harms the city's net worth is penny wise and pound foolish. Getting basic issues right will produce greater gains than many "brilliant" ideas politicians trumpet to dazzle or perhaps to bewilder voters. Being boring might not capture attention. But it does some good. Over the next several years if the city stays focused on CIP projects, if the city stays within its circle of competence, we will get there. 546 words (limit 550 words) Jeff Gudman Member—Lake Oswego City Council 4088 Orchard Way 503-697-7150 Pl�ii.�ll�i1 Please note the column is a reflection of my views and not necessarily those of the City Council