Tree Care and Maintenance

Seasonal Tree Care Tips: Summer
Emerald Ash Borer

Image courtesy of Leah Bauer, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station, Bugwood.org

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive insect from Asia believed to have come to the United States in the 1990s through international shipping. The EAB’s primary food is ash trees and when an EAB eats, ash trees die. All 16 North American ash species, including our native Oregon ash (Fraxinus latifolia) are vulnerable; the Union for Conservation of Nature has declared five U.S. ash species as “critically endangered.”

EAB first started killing ash trees in Michigan, but now EABs have been detected in 35 states, despite efforts by regulators to contain them. Since 2002, this exotic insect has killed over 100 million trees throughout the country, causing more than $3.5 billion dollars in damages. While EAB has not been detected in Oregon yet, it is moving rapidly across the U.S., as far west as Boulder, Colorado. The transportation of infested firewood during the summer camping season is thought to be a main factor in the spread of EAB.

EAB can cause significant damage to Oregon’s urban and rural ecosystems, including along streamsides where many wild ash trees grow. “Wild ash forests and urban ash trees face a threat that has cost other states billions of dollars.  Similar to wildfires, floods and other catastrophic threats, it is best to detect EAB quickly and deal with it swiftly,” said Wyatt Williams, the Oregon Department of Forestry’s invasive species specialist. Since 2006, the Oregon Departments of Forestry and Agriculture, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have surveyed Oregon for EAB and found none…yet. 

Oregon is one of the few western states that has a statewide EAB plan to protect and limit harm to the state and prepare its communities and citizens. The Oregon Invasive Species Council facilitated the plan’s development. Funding for this project was provided by the U.S. Forest Service Region 6 Western Competitive Grant for the “Forest Pest Detector Program.” The Oregon Readiness and Response Plan includes a statewide risk assessment, methods of early detection, and quarantine and communication plans.

Next time you head out for a family camping adventure, please remember to buy your firewood where you burn it! Check out these resources to learn more:

Don’t Move Firewood

Identify Invasive Pests

Oregon Forest Pest Detectors 

EAB Readiness and Response Plan for Oregon 

To report a suspected invasive species, visit oregoninvasiveshotline.org or call 1-866-INVADER.

 

Please check back for more seasonal tree care and maintenance advice!

 

Please check back for more seasonal tree care and maintenance advice!

Link to Tree Care and Maintenance Archives
 

Archives

Spring 2018: Pruning Young Trees

Winter 2017: Tree Related Storm Damage

Fall 2017: New Tree Selection and Planting

Summer 2017: Trees and Turfgrasses

Spring 2017: English Ivy Removal

Winter 2017: Recognizing Tree Risk

Summer 2016: Drought Stress

Fall 2016: Preparing Trees for Winter

 

Additional Tree Care Resources:

National Arbor Day Foundation The Morton Arboretum
Oregon Department of Forestry Tree Care Info
ISA Find an Arborist Oregon Community Trees
Oregon Department of Forestry Alliance for Community Trees

 

Right Tree in the Right Place

Use this handy guide for assistance in choosing the right species of tree based on the constraints of a site, such as overhead wires, narrow plant strips, and proximity to structures.

"Right Tree Right Place" - helpful information such as "Use this guide for assistance in choosing the right species of tree based on the constraints of a site, such as overhead wires, narrow plant strips, and proximity to structures."

"Master Plant List" - a guide to the plants that are acceptable for mitigation requirements in Lake Oswego.