Lake Oswego Reads 2009: Stubborn Twig

News
Videos of  Lake Oswego Reads 2009 Events

Winners from the Passport Drawing!

Held at the Japanese Market on Feb. 28 at 4 p.m.


$50 gift certificate to Kurata Restaurant-Richard Ferriera

$50 gift certificate to Kurata Restaurant-Georgianna Lukens

Basket of Japanese items-Maria Conkle

Basket of City of Lake Oswego items-Setsuko Larouche

 




Mayor Jack Hoffman From Mayor Jack Hoffman:
“I am very pleased that Lake Oswego, in conjunction with the other Oregon cities and counties, has chosen the book, “Stubborn Twig” as the shining center piece of its Lake Oswego Reads Program. The book is a compelling, and very personal story of three generations of a Japanese-American family whose American roots were set down in the early 1900’s in Hood River, Oregon. Through the eyes of this one family, the author takes the reader on the journey filled with the opportunities and challenges faced by this family, and countless other immigrant families in search of  the American Dream.”



Lake Oswego Reads 2009 in the News

About Lake Oswego Reads 2009:

The Lake Oswego Public Library invites the entire community to be part of the third annual Lake Oswego Reads program. Last February, over 7,000 people in Lake Oswego read and/or participated in the program of Lake Oswego Reads Three Cups of Tea.  Over 1,300 people heard co-authors Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin speak.  During the month of February, 2009 the Library, local schools, businesses and organizations will offer special programs and festivities connected with the Lake Oswego Reads book selection, Stubborn Twig: Three Generations in the Life of a Japanese American Family, by Lauren Kessler, the fascinating account of an Oregon family from 1903 to the present.  Through the lives of Masou Yasui and his family, we experience an often heartbreaking story of hard work and sacrifice.

By reading Stubborn Twig, our community will be participating in a statewide program Oregon Reads, part of “Oregon 150,” which celebrates the sesquicentennial of Oregon statehood. Libraries all over the state will be offering events based on the book.  New this year will be Lake Oswego Reads programs for children.  The Oregon Library Association has selected two titles for children to read as part of the Oregon Reads program. Bat 6, by Virginia Euwer Wolff, is the story of a Japanese/American girl on a softball team after WWII and is recommended for fourth through middle school readers.  For younger readers, Apples for Oregon, written by Deborah Hopkinson, is the story of bringing apple trees to the Hood River valley and covers a more traditional Oregon immigration story of a family coming by covered wagon from the east.


Pick up one of 800 free copies of Stubborn Twig (compliments of Friends of the Library) at the Lake Oswego Public Library on January 13 at 6:30 P.M., check out one from the Library or buy a copy at Graham’s Book & Stationary.  Everyone in the community is welcome to enjoy a month of fun and enrichment during the 2009 Lake Oswego Reads celebration.


 

Related Books & Other Materials

These books and other items are on the topic of the Japanese-American experience during World War II.

The Tule Lake Committee

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EVENTS!

Thanks to our Sponsors, All Events are Free Unless a Dollar Amount Appears



Click here for Teen Events
        Click here for Children's Events


Kickoff Party!
Tuesday, January 13, 6:30 - 9:00 p.m.


Party at the Library!  What better way to kick off Lake Oswego Reads than to distribute complimentary copies of Stubborn Twig?  On Tuesday evening, January 13, from 6:30 to 9:00 enjoy food from Japan at the Lake Oswego Library.  Just show your library card to get your own copy of Stubborn Twig.  The books and the party are compliments of the Friends of the Lake Oswego Library.

Menu for the Kick Off Party  Presented by (five-0-three) Restaurant & Bar:

 

1.  Steamed Shrimp & Pork Dumplings with Lime Ginger Sauce
2.  Chicken Teriyaki Skewers with Peanut Sauce
3.  Seaweed Salad
4.  Udon Noodle Salad with Shitaki Mushrooms & Sesame Vinaigrette
5.  Cured Salmon with Cucumber, Lemon & Wasabi Cream Cheese

503

(five-0-three) Catering is an extension of (five-0-three) Restaurant & Bar, 

located in West Linn.  Our name is derived from the Oregon telephone area 

code (503).  The name (five-0-three) represents our commitment to 

sourcing ingredients from, and supporting sustainable agriculture in Oregon 

communities. 

 

Our Executive Chef Johnny Nunn has created a menu that utilizes the 

freshest in locally sourced ingredients, and our staff is dedicated to offering 

superior customer service.  Owners and long time local residents, John and 

Amy McEwan are excited to extend their dream of offering a unique culinary 

experience that allows local residents a "downtown" dining experience 

without leaving the neighborhood.  (five-0-three) Restaurant is open for dinner

Tuesday - Saturday.  We offer live jazz every Sunday during brunch with 

featured local musician Kate Davis.

 

In addition to our restaurant, (five-0-three) offers a box lunch program, corporate 

catering, onsite private dining, offsite catering, and full service event 

planning expertise.  Allow us to assist you in planning every element of your 

special event at home or in the office, while you experience the satisfaction 

of being the ultimate host. 



Author  Lauren Kessler speaks

Wednesday, February 11 at 7:00 p.m.

Lake Oswego High School Auditorium, 2501 Country Club Rd.

Watch Lauren Kessler's presentation on television:

Ch

Date

Time

Title

21

Thursday, February 19, 2009

6:00:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Thursday, February 19, 2009

11:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Saturday, February 21, 2009

10:30:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Saturday, February 21, 2009

6:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Sunday, February 22, 2009

5:00:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

21

Monday, February 23, 2009

9:30:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

21

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

7:00:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

21

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

3:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

11:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

11

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

3:00:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

21

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

12:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

21

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

10:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

10:30:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Thursday, February 26, 2009

5:30:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Saturday, February 28, 2009

10:00:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Saturday, February 28, 2009

6:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

21

Monday, March 02, 2009

9:30:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Monday, March 02, 2009

9:30:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

21

Tuesday, March 03, 2009

3:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

21

Wednesday, March 04, 2009

1:30:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Thursday, March 05, 2009

12:00:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

21

Thursday, March 05, 2009

2:00:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Saturday, March 07, 2009

3:00:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Saturday, March 07, 2009

10:30:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

21

Monday, March 09, 2009

3:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

11:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Saturday, March 14, 2009

10:00:00 AM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Saturday, March 14, 2009

6:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

10:30:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

28

Saturday, March 21, 2009

6:00:00 PM

Lake Oswego Reads - 2009

 


All tickets have been distributed
to hear Lauren Kessler speak!


The first four people in line for tickets!
The first people in line to get their tickets
arrived before the Library was ope
n:

From left to right:  Charu Noir, Pat Perkins, Maria Conkle and Leo Conkle


**Free but tickets are required**


Lauren KesslerAll Tickets have been given away!
The Lake Oswego Public Library is happy to announce that Lauren Kessler will be speaking at the Lake Oswego High School Auditorium, 2501 Country Club Rd. in Lake Oswego on Wednesday, February 11 at 7:00 p.m. This event is for high school age, college age, and adults. Admission is free but a ticket is required for this event. Tickets
will be available at the Lake Oswego Public Library starting at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, January 24. There will be a two ticket per person limit and a Lake Oswego Library Card is required.  Note: the tickets will be valid until 15 minutes before the event begins on February 11. We expect a waiting list and suggest that you arrive early. Seating is first come, first served.


From the Author:

“At a time when everyone seems to be proclaiming that "the book is dead," how energizing and inspiring to have thriving community reading programs all across Oregon.  Lake Oswego Reads is a particularly bright star in this galaxy.  The enthusiasm (zest, flair, professionalism...all that) behind this yearly event  -- and especially the 2009 sesquicentennial event -- is remarkable.  I am both honored and thrilled to be a small part of it.” 
--Lauren Kessler


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Mah Jong lessons!

 

 

 




Mah Jong tiles





All Spaces  Filled!!
  No More Spaces Available!


February 2, 9, and 16 at 6:30 p.m.

Lake Oswego Chamber of Commerce, 242 B Ave.

Learn this centuries-old tile game surrounded by other new beginners.  If you play gin rummy or rummikube, you’ll love this ancient tile game. Meet at the Lake Oswego Chamber of Commerce on February 2, 9 and 16 at 6:30 for two  hours of personal instruction. Free registration through the Lake Oswego Library/Lake Oswego Reads Program, 503-675-2538. All materials provided.








Mitsuki Dazai, Japanese Koto Master
Tuesday, February 3 at 7:00 p.m.
Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street
Mitsuki Dazai, Koto PlayerDescribed by critics as “a most engaging performer,” “a virtuoso player of rare sensibilities,” and a musician who “to watch and hear her play is pure joy,” Mitsuki Dazai presents her mastery of the koto at First Tuesday, February 3, 7:00 P.M. at the Lake Oswego Library.  Ms. Dazai, currently teaching at Marylhurst College, has just completed two European tours, introducing audiences to koto music which ranges from centuries-old traditional music to contemporary.  She has been a featured performer at numerous international music festivals and is an innovative arranger and composer of koto music in many different styles; please enjoy this talented performer.





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Mitzi Asai LoftusMitzi Asai Loftus
Wednesday, February 4 at 7:00 p.m.
Oswego Heritage House, 398 10th Street
A personal account of Japanese internment during World War II.

Mitzi Asai Loftus will share the hardships she and her family were subjected to during the Second World War. Her parents immigrated to the United States from Japan early in the 20th century. Mitzi is one-hundred percent Japanese but American in terms of nationality because she was born in the United States.

 













Stubborn Twig Art Show Opening

Art Show Opening
Opening Reception, Thursday, February 5  from  6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. at  Graham’s Book and Stationery, 460 Second St. and Chrisman Picture Frame & Gallery, 480 2nd St.

Enjoy refreshments and snacks and be the first to view the Stubborn Twig inspired artwork by local artists and Lake Oswego High School student artists.  

 

Exhibitions will continue:

February 5 - 28, 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m., Monday - Saturday
12:00 - 5:00 p.m. Sunday at Graham's Book & Stationary
and Chrisman Picture Frame & Gallery,
480 2nd Street
Imagine art inspired directly from the reading of Stubborn Twig. Eleven artists from the talented Splash! group (as well as five invited artists) have created images that came to them as they read Stubborn Twig, and these never-before-seen paintings, sculpture, and photographs will be on display as part of Lake Oswego Reads.  Splash! is a group of professional artists whose works are shown in galleries, special exhibitions and are published in books.  Most of the members teach locally and/or internationally.  The art show will be featured at Graham’s Book and Stationery throughout February.  The first unveiling will be at the opening reception on Thursday, February 5, 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.  Graham’s will have the art on display through the rest of February, during regular business hours:  9:00 a.m.—6:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon—5:00 p.m. Sunday.  Exhibiting Artists from Splash!:  Patty Schmidt, Sally B. Bailey, Susie Cowen, Lois Larsen, Lee Baughman, Kathy Bethurum, Kara Pilcher, Hank Weber, Dyanne Locati, Maryellen Otten and Jan Rimerman.  Invited Artists:  Janet Otten, Susan Frohnmayer, Kathi Moore, Molly Reeves and Dave Haslett.
  Also, Lake Oswego High School students have created Japanese woodcuts inspired by the book.  Throughout February, the adult art will be displayed at Graham’s Book and Stationery and the high school art will be displayed at Chrisman Picture Frame & Gallery. 

 


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Japanese LunchJapanese Lunch
Friday, February 6 at 12:00 noon
at the Adult Community Center, 505 G Ave.

The cost is $4.00 for ages 60 and over, $5.00 for those under 60.

Reservations required, please call the Adult Community Center
at 503 635-3758.
  Enjoy a delicious Japanese meal and view a display of Japanese art and textiles at the Adult Community Center.  The luncheon includes teriyaki chicken, steamed rice, broccoli, Asian slaw, cone sushi, rice crackers, and green tea ice cream. 






 


Origami Extravaganza

& Lake Oswego's Largest Paper Crane at Graham's!
Saturday, February 7, from 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

at Graham’s Book and Stationery, 460 2nd Street

Origami Extravaganza!

An Origami expert, Karen Harris of the Yasutomo Company, will show & tell how to create dazzling flowers, birds and ornaments using the art of ancient Japanese paper folding. Watch at the demonstration then join in to try it at the workshop. Everybody can make their own creation and hang it on the community Peace Line. Also, discover the secrets of Kirigami!  And watch as Lake Oswego’s largest Origami-like Crane will be crafted and hung outside from the roof! Mother and daughter Lake Oswego jewelry artists, Molly & Kathleen Bowman, will show their stunning Stubborn Twig-inspired collection of medallions. You won’t believe that they are actually done on a tin can lid!


Sample the world’s best blended green tea of 2008 crafted by a Japanese Tea Master, Hiroyuki Sugimoto.  His son, Kyohei Sugimoto, will tell the stories behind the teas of Sen cha, Hoji cha and Genmai cha and the famous Japanese prefecture where they are grown. A delightful, new tasting experience!


Connections Make a Community:


The meaning of paper cranes: 
The Japanese culture has treasured the crane as a symbol of honor and loyalty. Legend says that anyone who folds one thousand paper cranes will have their heart's desire come true. The origami crane has become a symbol of peace because of this legend.

 

Purpose:  To connect students with their community (both school and city.) We would like students to identify what characteristics form both a strong community and strong community member. We also want to honor past and present members who help create a supportive and accepting neighborhood. 


Our city of Lake Oswego has created a community event to honor Japanese American citizens. Our school is participating in this neighborhood outreach by making these origami cranes for Graham’s Stationary. Graham’s will then display the cranes during a February event.

 

Steps: Inside each crane students will add a wish / hope for their community.  Guide students to develop a list full of positive qualities of a community member.  Below is a list of several words to start a classroom discussion. Have students thoughtfully choose one word to place on the wing of their crane that will represent their wish for the community.

Joyful, caring, friendly, gentle, polite, peaceful

 

Connection to MLK day: Mr. King’s vision was for American citizens to build a strong and accepting community in which all members are valued and cared for. King’s was a vision of a completely integrated society, a community of love and justice wherein brotherhood would be an actuality in all of social life.

 

Other Facts:

  • The Japanese word "origami" itself is a compound of two smaller Japanese words: "ori", meaning fold, and "gami", meaning paper.
  • Graham’s display: Saturday, February 7, from 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Origami experts will show and tell how to create dazzling flowers, birds and ornaments using the ancient art of Japanese paper folding.  Everybody can make their own creation and hang it on the “Community Peace” line.  And watch as Lake Oswego’s largest Origami Crane will be crafted and hung outside from Graham’s roof.



 

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Stubborn Twig book discussion!

Book Discussion (week one):

Sunday, February 8 at 7:00 p.m.

at Mountain Park Church, 40 McNary Parkway

Click here for the next book discussion

Click here for a list of all book discussions

Book Discussion Questions

 

 

 


Share Your Memories:
Stories of Oregon's Japane
se American Community

Tuesday, February 10 at 2:00 p.m.

at the Holy Names Heritage Center, 17425 Holy Names Dr.

Sharing Our Memories

Join us at Holy Names Heritage Center for an afternoon of stories about Oregon’s Japanese American community.  Speakers will share their memories of Portland’s vibrant Japantown, the St. Paul Miki School and Daycare Center for Japanese children, and the living conditions inside the Japanese internment camps during World War II.  Come just to listen or share your own stories about this important community. All are welcome at this free program.


Featured speakers George Nakata, Alice Ando, and Jean Matsumoto will share their memories of Portland’s vibrant Japantown and their experiences inside the Japanese internment camps during World War II.  Sister Marilyn Harris, SNJM, will discuss her experiences teaching at Portland’s St. Paul Miki School for Japanese children, which operated from 1938 until early 1942. These speakers will highlight the fascinating stories of Portland’s small but vital Japanese-American community and examine how the wartime internment experience forever changed the lives of Oregon’s Japanese-American citizens. Come to listen or to share your own stories about this important period in Oregon’s history.

Holy Names Heritage Center is a non-profit organization that promotes the preservation and study of Northwest history, culture, and arts, with a secondary programmatic emphasis on social justice and sustainability.  Through lectures, workshops, exhibits, and electronic media, the Center offers a wide array of educational opportunities. 

 






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Alton Chung, Japanese Storyteller
Wednesday, February 11 at 12:00 noon
at Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street
Alton Chung, StorytellerAlton Chung grew up with the stories, superstitions, and magic of the Hawaiian Islands. This, combined with his Japanese and Korean roots, gives him a unique perspective from which to tell cultural tales and personal stories with a deep sense of reverence and authenticity. On Wednesday, February 11, at the Lake Oswego Library, Alton will share true stories of Japanese-Americans during World War Two.  He will explore what it was like for the Issei and the Nisei (first and second generation Japanese-Americans) in Hawaii and in the continental United States. These stories offer a glimpse into the aftermath of Pearl Harbor, the internment camps, and the creation of the all Japanese-American 100th Battalion and 442nd Regimental Combat Team, which for its size and duration of service is the most highly decorated unit in the history of the US Military.








 

Lauren KesslerLauren Kessler Speaks
Wednesday, February 11 at 7:00 p.m.


Tickets are required!


Click here for ticket information and details!





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The Way of Tea: Chado

Formal Tea Ceremony:
The Way of Tea: Chado

Thursday, February 12 at 1:30 p.m.
at the Lake Oswego Public Library
706 4th Street

Presented by:
The Henjyoji Urasenke Study Group

Experience an introduction to “The Way of Tea: Chado”
 at the Lake Oswego Library, February 12, 2009 at 1:30pm, by the Henjyoji Urasenke Study Group.  Wa, Kei, Sei, Jaku, (Harmony, respect, purity and tranquility) are the principle pillars intended to provide a course of action to guide the individual’s life.  Wa (harmony) is the ultimate ideal for human beings. True harmony brings peace.  Kei (respect) is the ability to understand and accept others, even those who we may be in disagreement with. Extend a pure heart and true respect can be realized.  Sei (purity) is the ability to treat oneself and others with a pure and open heart. A pure heart is not showy but natural.  Jaku (tranquility) is the point in ones training and practice where a level of selflessness is reached. A true master reaches this highest level and then putting the ideals of harmony, respect and purity into practice, begins again with a fresh and enlightened heart. At this point the endless possibilities of life can be realized.

Chawan: Green Tea



 

 


Stubborn Twig book discussion!

Book Discussion (week two):

Friday, February 13 at 1:00 p.m.

at the Adult Community Center, 505 G Ave.

Click here for the next book discussion


Click here for a list of all book discussions

Book Discussion Questions

 


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Joan Yasui Emerson

Joan Yasui Emerson speaks:
Remembrances of a Sansei Granddaughter

Tuesday, February 17 at 7:00 p.m.
at the Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street

Joan Yasui Emerson, Masuo Yasui’s first grandchild, will speak about how the Japanese-American Internment affected her family, other Japanese-Americans and also people in Japan. She will discuss how fears were dealt with, what lessons were learned and how prejudice affects everyone.  Joan is the daughter of Chop and Mikie Yasui and was born at Tule Lake Internment Camp on July 29, 1942. After attending grade school and high school in Hood River, Oregon, she went on to graduate from the University of Oregon with a degree in Sociology. Pursuing a career in Social Work she received a Masters Degree from Bryn Mawr in Pennsylvania. She retired to Hood River, Oregon and is active in many community organizations. In February, 2007, Joan organized a Day of Remembrance in Hood River to address the silence about what happened during the war. She expected 50 people to attend and over 800 came from all over the region.


 

 

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Joan Yasui Emerson

Speaker at the Lake Oswego Women's Coalition Luncheon: Joan Yasui
Wednesday, February 18 at 11:45 a.m.
at the Oswego Lake Country Club,
20 Iron Mountain Blvd.
Reservations: 503-636-3634
Price: $15.00

Joan Yasui Emerson will share stories of her life as the eldest Sansei, third generation, grandchild in the Yasui family. She will talk about how we have all grown up in the same country, but how it was a different experience for Japanese Americans.  Joan, the daughter of Ray and Mikie Yasui, was born at Tule Lake Internment Camp. After attending grade school and high school in Hood River, Oregon, she graduated from the University of Oregon. She received a Masters Degree in Community Organization and Welfare Policy from Bryn Mawr. She worked for many years in Berkeley, California in the field of youth advocacy. She now lives in Hood River and is active in human rights advocacy. In February 2007, Joan organized a Day of Remembrance in Hood River to address the silence about what happened during the war. She expected 50 people to attend and over 800 came from all over the region.

 

 

 


The Trial of Minoru YasuiThe Constitution in a Time of War:
The Trial of Minoru Yasui

Readers' Theater with slides
Wednesday, February 18 at 7:00 p.m.
at the Lakewood Center for the Arts,
368 State Street

Sponsored by Oregon Minority Lawyers Association

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. The relocation process began with orders imposing a nighttime curfew on “all persons of Japanese ancestry.”  Within hours after the curfew took effect, a young, Japanese-American lawyer -- Minoru Yasui began walking the streets of Portland to challenge the military orders.  He was indicted for violating the curfew and was prosecuted in federal court.  

A readers’ theater group with slides will re-enact portions of the Yasui trial.

This theater reading is a recreation of one of the most famous Constitutional Law/Civil Rights case in US History. The case is known as US v. Minoru Yasui. It was a trial between the US Government and one US Citizen, Minoru Yasui. It was tried in 1942 in Portland, Oregon. At that time, Minoru Yasui was the only practicing Japanese American lawyer in Portland, Oregon . He was spending day and night helping Japanese Americans who were frantically trying to arrange their affairs in light of President Roosevelt's Executive Order 9066.

 

Executive Order 9066 authorized the Secretary of War to designate military zones from which "any and all persons" could be excluded. In 1942, the Executive Order was used to remove people of Japanese ancestry from their homes and relocate them to internment camps.

 

Minoru Yasui became the first person to challenge President Roosevelt's Executive Order 9066, when he defied a curfew rule that was imposed only on certain classes of people. The curfew hour rules were not equally imposed on all US Citizens.  Min Yasui's argument was that laws should be applied equally to all US Citizens. For the first time Min Yasui was not in his usual role as lawyer and legal counselor for his clients, he became the defendant in one of the most famous Constitutional cases in US history.  

 

The production was created by New York US District Judge Denny Chin in cooperation with the Asian American Bar Association of New York. And since Minoru Yasui and his family were from the Hood River area and the federal trial was in Portland, this is a powerful presentation for local audiences.

 

The production will be performed by distinguished local attorneys, a judge and local law students. Nationally recognized attorney Peggy Nagae will be a performer and lead a post-production discussion about Min Yasui and his legal case. Peggy Nagae was the lead attorney in Yasui v. US reopening Mr. Yasui's Supreme Court case from the 1940's. A portion of this story was described in Stubborn Twig. Henry Sakamoto, a former internee will be providing short personal accounts of his experience during the reading.

 

Co-sponsored by Oregon Minority Lawyers Association, the Oregon Commission on Asian Affairs, and the Lakewood Center for the Arts.

 

The Yasui cases are as follows:

 

US v. Yasui, 48 F. Supp. 40 (D. Ore. 1942)

 

Yasui v. US, 320 U.S. 115 (1943)

 

Yasui v. US, 772 F.2d 1496 (9th Cir. 1985)

 



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Japanese Gardens Tour

Tour of the Japanese Gardens

Thursday, February 19 at 1:30 p.m.
Meet at the Lake Oswego Public Library,
706 4th Street

Reservations required: 503-675-2538
Admission & bus ride: $5.00
Transportation leaves the Library
at 12:45 p.m.

Nestled in the scenic west hills of Portland, the Japanese Garden is a haven of tranquil beauty which has been proclaimed one the most authentic Japanese gardens outside of Japan.  Encompassing five and one-half acres and five separate garden styles, the Garden includes an authentic Japanese Tea House, meandering streams, intimate walkways, and an unsurpassed view of Mt. Hood.   This is your opportunity to visit the Japanese Garden.  Transportation round-trip from the Library and a private group tour is only $5.  Limited space.  Reservations required by calling 503-675-2538, and payment is due at the Library to hold a spot.

 

 

 

Stubborn Twig book discussion!

Book Discussion (week three):

Friday, February 20 at 1:00 p.m.

at the Adult Community Center, 505 G Ave.

Click here for the next book discussion

Click here for a list of all book discussions

Book Discussion Questions

 

 

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Calligraphy, Tea & Stories

Brush Calligraphy & Japanese Green Tea

Saturday, February 21 from 11:00 to 4:00 p.m.
at Graham's Book & Stationary

Watch a calligraphy demonstration and sample award-winning green tea at Graham’s Book and Stationery on Saturday, February 21. Calligraphy uses brushes to bring art to wordplay.  Individuals will be given an opportunity to try their hand on the magical “Buddha” boards.  Sample the word’s best blended green tea of 2008.  The son of a Japanese Tea Master will tell the stories behind the teas of Sen cha, Joji cha and Genmai cha.  Join in a delightful new tasting experience!

 

 

 


A Blossoming of Memories

Poetry, Storytelling & Music:
A Blossoming of Memories

Sunday, February 22 at 6:30 p.m.
at Moonstruck Chocolate Cafe
45 S. State Street

Poet Joan Maiers hosts a program of poetry, story and music commemorating Japanese culture, Sunday, February 22 at the Lake Oswego Moonstruck Chocolate Café.  The event will feature local poets Ritz Kyoko Mori and Leah Stenson, as well as Michael Whelan, multi-cultural storyteller.  Additionally, Peter Zisa and Yukiko Vossen will collaborate in a koto performance.  The event is free and open to the public.  Joan Maiers’ works have been published in dozens of print and electronic media.  She works with writers of all ages, including students at Marylhurst University.  Michael Whelan won a national award for his book of Irish stories, "Into the Magic." He headlined the Irish Championship of Music and Dance in 2003 and was the first American and the first storyteller so chosen. He teaches Asian Mythology at PCC.  Michael Whelan won a national award for his book of Irish stories Into the Magic. He headlined the Irish Championship of Music and Dance in 2003 and was the first American and the first storyteller so chosen. He teaches Asian Mythology at PCC.

 




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Bonsai DemonstrationBonsai Demonstration
Monday, February 23 at 1:30 p.m.
at the Lake Oswego Public Library,
706 4th Street  

Dr. Ron Hillenbrand brings twenty years of experience raising and training Bonsai trees in Lake Oswego to a presentation, Monday, February 23 at Lake Oswego Library, 1:30 P.M.  Dr. Hillenbrand is a retired Oral & Maxillofacial surgeon who is a member of the Bonsai Society of Portland and is a former member and past president of the East Bay Bonsai Society in the San Francisco
Bay area.  He currently has 30 trees, of different species, under cultivation.  His presentation will cover the art of Bonsai.


The Art Of Bonsai

The Japanese art of Bonsai originated in China and was imported to Japan in approximately 700 AD and was adapted to the cultural and gardening traditions of that time. Because space has always been a consideration in Japanese homes and gardens, the gardener often has had to capture the essence of a natural setting without duplicating it. Painted scrolls of the 13thcentury depict trees growing in small containers and many references to this art appear later in Chinese and Japanese visual art and literature.

 

Bonsai (pronounced bone-sigh) in Japanese translates to “tree in a tray”. Most typical bonsai are from 12 to 30 inches tall while there is a sub-class termed Shohin that is from 6 to 12 inches tall. The objective of the art is to create the feeling of age in a tree or plant contained in an artistically matched pot or tray.

This is accomplished by following certain rules, among which are:

 

  • Almost all bonsai trees raised in Oregon, except tropical varieties, are meant to be kept outdoors all year long. They are, after all, trees and as such need sun and rain and temperature change to stay healthy. They can be brought indoors for display for 2 or 3 days, but nothing will kill a bonsai faster than to be permanently placed on top of a TV.
  • Bonsai need to be re-potted every 2 to 3 years. They become root-bound just like any potted plant, in fact faster in some cases, such as Redwood trees. At this time the roots are trimmed and the tree is placed back in the same pot with new soil and wired in place. Trees stay upright because of large“tap roots” which are removed on bonsai trees so they can fit into their pots. The smaller finer feeder roots are kept and the tree is supported with wires coming through the bottom of the pot.
  • The trees are pruned/trimmed every year to keep them in balance with the roots and to maintain a pleasing silhouette and shape. The time and silhouette for this varies with the tree species and effect desired.
  •  At the time of the pruning, the placing and direction of the tree’s branches may be changed by the use of wire. Two types of wire are used, the preferred wire is copper because of it’s holding power and softer aluminum is also used on more delicate limbs. Care must be used to remove these wires, depending on the bark and growth of the tree, before they cut into the bark and leave a disfiguring scar.
  • Fertilizing of these trees is done on a regular basis since the soil used in potting these trees does not usually have an organic portion, but is porous inorganic particles, such as lava rock, pumice and fired clay. An organic fertilizer can be placed on the surface of the pot’s soil or a low concentration organic liquid fertilizer can be applied to the leaves and soil.

These are some basics of bonsai care and should be reinforced with reading some of the following books:

 

Bonsai, An Illustrated Guide to an Ancient Art
by Sunset Books, Sunset Publishing Corp., Menlo Park, California

 

The Complete Book of Bonsai   
by Harry Tomlinson,
Doubleday Canada Limited, Toronto, Ontario

 

Bonsai, Its Art, Science, History, and Philosophy
by
Deborah R. Koreshoff, Timber Press, Portland, Oregon

 

Bonsai, The Art of Growing and Keeping Miniature Trees

By Peter Chan, Chartwell Books Inc., Secaucus, New Jersey

 

The Art of Bonsai  
by Peter D. Adams,  Ward Lock Limited, London

 

 

For further information and mentoring lessons contact:

 

Bonsai Society of Portland

PO Box 10615

Portland Oregon 97296-0615

Official Website: www.portlandbonsai.org

 

The Bonsai Society of Portland meets on the fourth Tuesday of each month, except during the summer, at 7:00 pm at:

St. Phillip Neri Parish

2408 SE 16th Ave

Portland Oregon

(Northeast Corner of SE Division and 16th Ave,)

 

 

 

 

Stubborn Twig book discussion!

Book Discussions (week four):

Monday, February 23 at 7:00 p.m.

at the West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way

Final book discussion:

Friday, February 27 at 1:00 p.m.

at the Adult Community Center, 505 G Ave.

Click here for a list of all book discussions

Book Discussion Questions

 

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Film: On Paper Wings

Film: On Paper Wings
& Filmmaker Ilana Sol

Tuesday, February 24 at 7:00 p.m.
at the Lakewood Center for the Arts,
368 S. State Street

During World War II, the Japanese military developed a new weapon intended to strike directly at the American continent - the balloon bomb. High school girls across Japan were conscripted into factories where they worked long days making paper to be assembled into giant balloons. Most had no idea that the balloons they were making would be attached to bombs and then launched into the jet stream to drift toward North America. The idea sounded ludicrous; but thousands of balloon bombs were launched by the Japanese military, and hundreds did arrive after being carried by the wind 6000 miles across the Pacific. In the spring of 1945, a Japanese balloon bomb claimed the lives of the only people killed on the continental U.S. as the result of enemy action during WWII - five children and a pregnant woman on a picnic near Bly, Oregon.  Forty years later, the decision to fold a thousand paper cranes would unite the Japanese and American civilians who were involved in and affected by this incident. 

 

“On Paper Wings” is a documentary film by Ilana Sol about the lives of the Japanese and American civilians who were affected by the balloon bomb project, and how they all came together forty years after the end of the war. Ilana Sol is a filmmaker who lives and works in Portland, Oregon. She has worked in the film industry for ten years on a variety of independent, educational and commercial projects. When her hobby of historical research led her to find out about the Japanese balloon bombs, she soon found herself spending hundreds of hours researching these bizarre weapons, and traveling thousands of miles to meet with those affected by them. She is the recipient of grants from the Oregon Council for the Humanities, the Regional Arts and Culture Council, and the Oregon Heritage Commission. “On Paper Wings” is her first film.






 


Ken Yaguchi

A Nisei in World War II
Wednesday, February 25 at 7:00 p.m.

at the Stafford-A Boutique Retirement Center
1200 Overlook Drive

Lake Oswego resident Ken Yaguchi has a fascinating story to tell.  He was a high school senior when Japan attacked the Pearl Harbor, Hawaii naval base in December, 1941.  Shortly thereafter, Japanese American men like Yaguchi were categorized as 4C non-draftable and Japanese American families were forced to live in concentration camps.  When the government later reversed its former decision and permitted Japanese Americans to join the military, Yaguchi volunteered.  He joined the 442nd Infantry Regimental Combat Team and fought in Italy, France, and Germany.  After the war, Yaguchi even met President Truman.  Yaguchi shares his personal experiences in this not-to-be-missed presentation that will bring the historical period to life for the audience.    





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IkebanaIkebana Presentation

February 26, 2009 at 1:30 p.m.

The Saga Goryu Hokubei Shisho School of Ikebana will present a demonstration at the Library.  Ikebana (Japanese Flower Arranging) is an external manifestation of an individual’s internal state.  The arrangements are often viewed as transient pieces of art by consumers, but can also be viewed by the creator as a mirror of one’s internal condition.  As a contemplative activity, insight may be gained , during the practice a  quiet and aware mind becomes  of the existence of harmony within the self and the surrounding environs in the universe.  Harmony and balance between “heaven” (Ten), “Earth” (Chi) and Man (Jin) is an essential part of maintaining the equilibrium of the cosmos.  The quietude of ikebana also provides and opportunity for cultivation of an increased awareness of the self and a method of assessing, creating, and modifying behavior with plant materials being the vehicle of self-discovery.  These acquired skills may be on help during times of hardships and joy.  Come experience the quietude, reflection and beauty of “The way of Flowers: Kado”.

 

 


Japanese MarketJapanese Market
Saturday, February 28
from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

at the West End Building
4101 Kruse Way

Speakers:
Virginia Euwer Wolff: 11:00 a.m.
Deborah Hopkinson: 2:00 p.m.

Sushi Demonstrations:
At 12:00 and 1:00 p.m.

Virginia Euwer Wolff
Deborah Hopkinson  

Virginia Euwer Wolff

Deborah Hopkinson
 

Virginia Euwer Wolff is the author of
Bat 6, Deborah Hopkinson is the author of Apples to Oregon

 
   

Please join us at this special event in honor of the Lake Oswego Reads book, Stubborn Twig.  Browse through unique treasures from silk scarves and jewelry to bonsai trees and bamboo wares.  Share a cup of traditional tea as you enjoy the splendor of the market.  Sample delightful delicacies from Japanese restaurants and enjoy the excitement of traditional music and dance.  Bring the whole family and learn to master the art of origami.  This event offers a truly unique educational and fun experience for the whole family. 

Confused about sushi?  Lake Oswego culinary instructor Barb Randall will present "Sushi 101" for those interested in learning more about the popular Japanese food.  Learn about the ingredients used, and tools and specific techniques used to create this beautiful, artful food.  The demonstrations at noon and 1:00 p.m. on February 28,  are free.


Market Vendors:

Kiyokawa Family Orchards:
The popular Lake Oswego Farmers ’ Market vendor will be selling apples, pears, Asian pears, jam, cards and handmade paper collages at the Japanese Market.

Coqu Maho: This local artist will feature wood cut prints, original brush paint and jewelry.

Issoan Tea School:  This unique tea school will be providing tea ceremony demonstrations throughout the market as well as selling tea supplies and tea.

Kurata:  This favorite Lake Oswego restaurant will be serving a variety of different types of sushi for you to enjoy as you meander through the market.

Springwater Farm:  Another Farmers’ Market favorite!  This vendor will be providing cultivated and wild mushrooms including shiitake and maitake.


Kiyokawa Family Orchards







Kiyokawa Orchards, Hood River Valley's finest fruit since 1911, enriches our author speaking series with samples of Oregon's best fruit during the childrens hour on Feb 28th at the West End Building.  Owner Randy Kiyokawa, 3rd generation orchardist in the Hood River Valley, is a regular at the LO Farmers Market each summer. More information about the orchards and the Fruit Loop drive can be found at www.mthoodfruit.com.





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Teen Events for Lake Oswego Reads 2009



Manga Discussion Group Japanese Manga Book Discussion Group
Monday, February 9 from 4:00-5:00 p.m.
in the Library's meeting room

Please call 503-697-6580 to sign up
Teens in grades 9-12 are invited to discuss their favorite manga graphic novels on Tuesday, January 17 at 4:00 p.m.  Snacks will be provided. 









Origami Craft!

Origami Craft Program with Tomoko Brigham
Tuesday, February 17 at 4:00 p.m.

at the Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street
Pre- registration required.  Reservations: 503-697-6580
Origami craft, presented by Tomoko Brigham, for 7 through 12,

A native of Japan, Tomoko Kawai Brigham earned an Associate Degree in liberal arts at Kobe Women Junior College in Kobe, Japan and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in linguistics at the University of Oregon.  She has extensive teaching and tutoring experience in a variety of schools, including local Japanese language immersion schools and university ESL classes.  She has taught Japanese culture, flower arranging and origami to students of all ages.




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Children's Events for Lake Oswego Reads 2009!



Tears of Joy Puppet Theatre presents:
The Lucky Teakettle

Saturday, February 14 from 11:00 a.m.
in the children's department
Ages 4 and up
Families are invited to a special puppet show, “The Lucky Teakettle: A Tale from Japan” on Saturday, February 14 at 11:00 a.m.  This event is recommended for children ages 4 and up.  The program features a combination of puppetry and storytelling presented by Tears of Joy Theatre’s Emily Alexander.  In her new version of the old Japanese folktale, a little badger is freed from a trap and is so grateful he morphs into a teakettle that performs wondrous feats in a circus.  Emily Alexander grew up learning the crafts of brining stories alive on stage.  She’s toured with Tears of Joy nationally and has also directed several new productions.  Tears of Joy Theatre is recognized as one of the nation’s outstanding puppet companies.  Their productions are performed for over 250,000 nationwide each year.     

           


 



Origami Craft Program!

Origami Craft Program
Tuesday, February 17 at 2:00 p.m.

at the Lake Oswego Public Library
Pre- registration required.  Reservations: 503-697-6580
Origami craft, presented by Tomoko Brigham, for ages six and up,




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Create a Japanese Hanging Fish!

Children's Craft:
Create a Hanging Japanese Fish

Saturday, February 21 at 11:00 a.m.

at the Lake Oswego Public Library












Virginia Euwer WolffBook Discussion Group with Bat 6 author
Virginia Euwer Wolff (grades 3 -7)

Saturday February 28 at 11:00 a.m.

at the West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way
Registration is required.  Please call 503-697-6580 to sign up.
In celebration of Lake Oswego Reads, local author Virginia Euwer Wolff will conduct a book discussion group for children in grades 3-7, focusing on her acclaimed title for children, Bat 6.  The program takes place at the West End Building during the Japanese Market event, on Saturday, February 28 at 11:00 a.m.  Bat 6 explores the Japanese experience in post-WWII Oregon.  The Library has multiple copies of the book, which should be read in preparation for this program.  Registration is required.  Please call 503-697-6580 to sign up.  

 

Virginia Euwer Wolff is an award-winning author of six books for young readers.  Her honors include the National Book Award, the Michael L. Printz Honor, the Golden Kite Award, the International Reading Association Children’s Book Award, the Jane Addams Book Award, the PEN-West Book Award, and the Oregon Book Award.  Critics have described her writing as “triumphant,” “transcendent,” and “groundbreaking.”  According to School Library Journal Wolff’s novel Bat 6 “…delves into the irreversible consequences of war and the necessity to cultivate peace and speaks volumes about courage, responsibility, and reconciliation…”  Wolff is an Oregon City resident and native Oregonian.  She’s been a teacher for over 30 years and enjoys playing the violin.

 




Deborah Hopkinson

Book Talk with Apples to Oregon author
Deborah Hopkinson (ages 5 and up)

Saturday February 28 at 2:00 p.m.

at the West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way

No sign up is required for this program.

Deborah Hopkinson presents an author talk for families and children ages five and up on Saturday, February 28 at 2:00 p.m.  The program takes place at the West End Building during the Japanese Market event.  Hopkinson will focus on her picture book an Oregon pioneer family, Apples to Oregon, as well as her other titles.  No sign up is required for the program.  A three-time Oregon Book Award finalist, Hopkinson received a bachelor’s degree in English at the University of Massachusetts and a master’s degree in Asian Studies from the University of Hawaii at Manoa.  She has written award-winning picture books, short fiction, and nonfiction for children.  A frequent presenter at conferences and schools, she lives near Portland, where she works as a senior director of philanthropy for an organization providing mental health services to children.


Kiyokawa Family Orchards
Kiyokawa Orchards, Hood River Valley's finest fruit since 1911, enriches our author speaking series with samples of Oregon's best fruit during the childrens hour on Feb 28th at the West End Building.  Owner Randy Kiyokawa, 3rd generation orchardist in the Hood River Valley, is a regular at the LO Farmers Market each summer. More information about the orchards and the Fruit Loop drive can be found at www.mthoodfruit.com.



Lake Oswego Schools Involvement:

 

The Origami Peace Line constructed by the students of Forest Hills Elementary

This project is intended to strengthen our personal and community bonds. Two Forest Hills mothers are showing the older students how to fold origami cranes – the traditional Japanese symbol of peace and good wishes. The older students will then show their younger ‘buddies’ and together they will fold over 400 cranes that will be hung on the community Peace Line. Each creation will hold a personal message from the student.

After its creation it will be hung at Graham’s Book & Stationery for most of February. At the end of the month, the Peace Line will be moved to the West End Building for the Japanese Market.

 

High Schools

Both Lake Oswego High Schools are thrilled to be participating in Lake Oswego Reads for the third year. Lake Oswego High School and Lakeridge High School will incorporate themes from Stubborn Twig in selected English class curriculum. Students look forward to Manga classes at the library and hearing the author speak at the LOHS auditorium.  Other events that students and staff are excited about include a fascinating documentary and talk with the film-maker about the Japanese-American experience in Oregon and musical celebrations around town. Encompassing both young and old, Stubborn Twig invites all to celebrate diverse cultures in Lake Oswego.

 



Click here for a complete list of Event Locations and Addresses!


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Lake Oswego Reads 2009


Lake Oswego Public Library Announces
the Book Selection for the Third Annual Lake Oswego Reads:


Stubborn Twig:


The Lake Oswego Public Library has announced that Stubborn Twig: Three Generations in the Life of a Japanese American Family by Lauren Kessler, is the book selection for the 2009 annual citywide reading program Lake Oswego Reads. Oregon is turning 150 in 2009, and this book is also the selection for Oregon Reads, and every community with a library in Oregon will be reading it between January and April 2009. Oregon Reads is part of the celebration of Oregon’s Sesquicentennial. 

Stubborn Twig is a fascinating account of an Oregon family from the turn of the last century to the turn of this one. Through the lives of Masuo Yasui and his family, we experience an often heartbreaking story of hard work and sacrifice. Coming on the heels of Lake Oswego Reads’ Three Cups of Tea, Stubborn Twig touches on many of the same themes, such as perseverance, the clash of cultures and the difficulties of assimilation, while bringing these issues close to home,” said Director of the Lake Oswego Library, Bill Baars.

 

Last February over 7,000 people in Lake Oswego read and/or participated in the program of Lake Oswego Reads Three Cups of Tea. Over 1,300 people heard the  co-authors Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin speak. Cyndie Glazer, the coordinator of the Lake Oswego Reads program at the Lake Oswego Library said, “We are looking forward to another successful community reading program and are looking for residents in Lake Oswego who have Japanese talents or experiences that they are willing to share. We also want to hear stories of life in Hood River and/or events surroundings World War II.” She added, “We are happy to announce that we have already arranged to have the author, Lauren Kessler speak in Lake Oswego on February 11.” 

 

Stubborn Twig tells the story of one Japanese American family's century-long struggle to adjust, endure and ultimately triumph, spanning across Hood River, Portland and Eugene. It begins in 1903, when Masuo Yasui arrived in Hood River, Oregon, to seek his fortune. This part of the story is similar to other immigrants' tales-years of hard work, loneliness, and struggles with a new language and customs. Yasui, his brother, their wives, and children had sacrificed much to establish a thriving general store and owned several orchards. Yasui, who spoke fluent English, was the acknowledged leader of the Japanese community in the area and an active member of the orchardists' cooperatives, the Methodist Church, and the Rotary Club. His family continued to have great success until their lives were painfully disrupted on December 7, 1941. Yasui was arrested as a spy and imprisoned for the rest of the war; his relatives were scattered and some were interned. This book puts human faces and emotions to the events of that period. New this year, Lake Oswego Reads will offer programs for children. 

About Masuo Yasui and his work


Bat 6 and Apples to Oregon:

The Oregon Library Association has also selected Bat 6 by Virginia Euwer Wolff and Apples to Oregon by Deborah Hopkinson as titles for children to read as part of Oregon’s Sesquicentennial. Bat 6 compliments Stubborn Twig, as it is the story of a Japanese/American girl on a softball team after WWII. This title is suitable for fourth grade through middle school. Apples to Oregon is the story of bringing apple trees to the Hood River valley and covers a more traditional Oregon immigration story of a family coming by covered wagon from the east. Both authors will be speaking on February 28 in Lake Oswego. Thanks to the Friends of the Library, 800 complimentary copies of the recently reprinted Stubborn Twig including a forward by Governor Ted Kulongoski will be distributed to Library card holders at the January 13th kick off event at the Lake Oswego Library. The steering committee is planning additional events for February 2009 based on the book which will include a market at the West End Building on February 28, speakers on history, a demonstration of Bonsai and a koto concert.

 

Other suggestions are encouraged by calling Cyndie Glazer at 503-675-2538
or email
cglazer@ci.oswego.or.us

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Lake Oswego Reads 2009 Photographs!



LINKS:

Oregon Reads 2009

Library Main Page

Click here for an Events Calendar





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