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Approved Minutes - 2018-07-17 O�`A Eykt a„ CITY COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING H MINUTES V i 0 July 17, 2018 OREGO. 6. CALL TO ORDER Mayor Studebaker called the regular City Council meeting to order at 3:25 p.m., following the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency meeting on July 17, 2018, in the City Council Chambers, 380 A Avenue. Present: Mayor Studebaker and Councilors Manz, LaMotte, Gudman, Kohlhoff, O'Neill, and Buck Staff Present: Scott Lazenby, City Manager; David Powell, City Attorney; Anne-Marie Simpson, City Recorder; Scot Siegel, Planning and Building Services Director; Debra Andreades, Senior Planner; Ivan Anderholm, Parks and Recreation Director 7. CITIZEN COMMENT • Kate Myers, 5750 Carman Drive Ms. Myers advised that the Lake Forest Neighborhood Association (NA) had submitted a letter reiterating their opposition to any form of island annexation, and she affirmed that position. The staff report for the scheduled study session had raised many new questions about process and impacts, particularly because a policy change might create a sort of"limbo"for residents regarding responsibilities of County and City; she cited a number of examples that could prove troubling. Despite multiple requests and their own efforts, the NA was concerned about the City's lack of support for the public outreach process that had been discussed repeatedly. Before Council moves forward with a substantive policy change, she emphasized, it was essential for the NA to have a clear understanding of all elements and impacts involved. Council was asked to focus on the results that were being sought, through a process that engages the community. • Carolyn Krebs, 16925 Denney Court Ms. Krebs presented additional comment on behalf of the Lake Forest NA. Citing several examples, she expressed the NA's disappointment in the outreach effort discussed by Council, which was yet to produce anything substantive. She reviewed four requests of the NA that should be addressed prior to a City Council vote on whether or not to move forward with an election: that City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 1 of 12 July 17, 2018 the stakeholders be engaged in public meetings to gain mutual understanding; that a listening post be provided to communicate !earnings from the stakeholder meetings to the public; that proposed language for an annexation vote be presented at a public hearing; that the language be revised, if deemed necessary by the Council. Incorporating these steps in the process was a priority for ensuring that Council and the voters had a clear understanding of what 'yes' and 'no' votes would mean. • Paul Lyons, 2250 Wembley Park Road Mr. Lyons spoke as an advocate of right-sized affordable housing. Having served in various housing study groups, he had observed changes in the community. Families continue to move to Lake Oswego because of the schools and neighborhoods, but many seniors now wish to downsize and stay in the neighborhoods; available housing stock is insufficient. He cited statistics relating to the percentage of city residents 65 years and older. After discussing financial challenges with construction of secondary dwelling units, he focused on the issue of single-family homes being torn down on larger lots. Rather than replacement with one large single-family home, Council was asked to consider the benefits of cottage housing, i.e., small pocket neighborhoods that could be built on these large properties. Councilor O'Neill inquired about the source of the demographics cited, and Mr. Lyons indicated that it was based on census data available through Portland State University. In confirming information from Councilor LaMotte, Mr. Lyons observed that there needed to be housing at various price levels in order for seniors to remain in the community. • Jim Bolland, 804 5th Street Mr. Bolland conveyed the support of the Lake Oswego Neighborhood Action Coalition for the Lake Forest NA position on island annexation. Reviewing background of the issue, he drew Council's attention to language in the City's Comprehensive Plan, including a requirement that annexation policies ensure that annexation of new territory does not detract from the City's ability to provide services to existing residences. This point had not yet been considered, he stated; it would be necessary that Comprehensive Plan amendments, with required public process, be enacted before taking the proposed action. He discussed other considerations that needed to be addressed before moving forward with a vote; these included consultation with the County and potential community strife arising from a vote. Many open questions remained to be answered, and he urged Council to listen to the NA before making any decisions. • Randy Covey, 18530 Pilkington Road Mr. Covey expressed his opposition to a vote on annexation. He prefers that the current policy be retained as it allows only him to make the decision about annexation for his property. He responded to Councilors' specific questions about the property. 7.1 Prior Citizen Comment Follow-Up No follow-up on prior Citizen Comment was presented. City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 2 of 12 July 17, 2018 8. STUDY SESSIONS 8.1 Annexation Policy Council Report Mr. Lazenby reviewed the Council's two previous study sessions on annexation policy. Staff recommendations were being provided in this study session in support of the Council Goal to reconsider the current policy, as discussed in the Council Report. Inefficiencies of the current lot- by-lot process pose issues in serving the scattered properties, including police protection, street maintenance, and sewer extensions. Staff recognized that Council had expressed the need for citizen engagement. In seeking a suitable annexation method, they now recommended that the election method be considered (Council Report, p 2). He affirmed the validity of earlier speakers' concerns about the need to answer a number of questions in advance. Next he discussed the recommendation of the May 2019 general election; he suggested that this would be more effective in determining citizens' positions on annexation than other means, e.g., a survey. Should an area vote not to annex, staff would then recommend that the current process be revised to annex properties in more logical groups, e.g., a block on a street, to provide for cleaner jurisdictional transfer from the County to the City. On behalf of staff, he urged that Council consider an alternative to the current inefficient process. Mayor Studebaker called for discussion of the staff recommendations (Council Report, p 3). The first item, calling for island annexation of commercial properties in accordance with current code, involved properties along Bangy and Meadows roads. Council consensus indicated support for proceeding with this. Councilor LaMotte suggested that the City also reach out separately to owners of commercial properties not eligible for island annexation. Councilor Gudman suggested instead that the City proceed immediately with the one six-property island annexation that had been previously identified; staff could return to Council at a later date with a recommendation on the Bangy Road properties. Councilor LaMotte recommended that outreach efforts also be made in order to annex dispersed commercial properties along Boones Ferry Road that remain unincorporated. Before discussing the other staff recommendations, Mayor Studebaker asked Council members if they would consider undertaking island annexations of residential property without a prior vote of affected residents or other process. The consensus indicated that Council would not support such an approach. Mayor Studebaker moved next to staff's recommendation that annexation elections be scheduled for May 2019 (No. 2). Councilor Buck indicated that he would not support moving forward with these elections with only the limited outreach described in the staff report. Councilor Manz suggested that outreach beyond the proposed Option No. 3 would include two meetings with each of the affected neighborhoods, supplemented by social media and other substantive efforts; with those changes, she could support annexation elections. Councilor Kohlhoff expressed agreement, noting that Councilors should take part in the outreach effort, as well. The City should make it clear that the current annexation policy remained City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 3 of 12 July 17, 2018 in place until elections were held, and also should communicate explicitly the effects of a neighborhood's 'no' vote. Councilor Gudman expressed concurrence with his colleagues' support for enhanced communication, if the decision was made to proceed. It was a mistake, however, to take any action beyond the current proposal for the commercial properties; the cost/benefit analysis did not justify doing so, in his view. Councilor O'Neill identified the need for Council members to be better informed about annexation. He opposed an approach that would be punitive for residents, whether or not they lived in unincorporated areas. The outreach should focus on positive elements that bring people together. Councilor LaMotte echoed the need for more information about effects and endorsed the recommended May elections. Councilor Manz also supported the elections as a means of guiding the Council, as well as affording residents the opportunity to decide in a direct, democratic way. Mayor Studebaker summarized: The Council wished to proceed with the annexation elections in May, with at least two meetings per neighborhood and other outreach in advance. Mr. Powell outlined the additional public process that would follow a 'yes' vote by a neighborhood, including a public hearing; he responded to related questions from Council members. He also responded to Councilor Kohlhoff's questions specifically about intergovernmental agreements pertaining to these neighborhoods. Councilor Buck asked that staff prepare an outreach plan for Council adoption. Mr. Lazenby agreed to do so, noting that it would include Council's involvement and a timeline for actions. Next Mayor Studebaker requested Councilors' positions on the recommendation to discontinue lot-by-lot annexation until after the election (No. 5). In ensuing discussion, Council O'Neill stated that he preferred to maintain the current policy, and Councilor Gudman concurred. Councilor Kohlhoff expressed her preference that the Council discontinue lot-by-lot annexations immediately. Councilor LaMotte endorsed this approach, suggesting that an alternative be offered, i.e., annexation as part of a block of properties. Councilor Manz strongly opposed any policy change prior to a May vote, preferring to avoid punitive effects and to foster collaboration. Councilor Buck concurred, noting that neighborhoods have come to rely on the current system; it should remain in place until a vote has indicated a different direction. Mayor Studebaker called for a show of hands by Council members in favor of allowing lot-by-lot annexation, in accordance with current policy, until such time as an election is held. The majority of Council indicated their support. In further discussion, Councilor LaMotte discussed the need to identify the City's future annexation policy prior to the election in the event a neighborhood voted against annexation. Councilor O'Neill requested that staff's report to Council clarify the actual costs to the City for sewer connection as compared to the property owner's costs. Mr. Lazenby indicated that this information would be included. Noting that other challenges were posed by the patchwork of jurisdiction, including police response and street improvements, he advised that at least the pros and cons would be listed, if not all related costs. Councilor Manz asked about the timeline for implementation if a neighborhood voted in favor of annexation. Staff indicated that the change could be immediate or Council could specify an effective date, subject to statutory limitations. In contrast, an island annexation could be implemented in no less than three years. Mayor Studebaker posed the question of how the City should proceed if Council does not approve island annexation, i.e., would annexation be limited to blocks of lots or would it continue City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 4 of 12 July 17, 2018 to be allowed lot by lot? Councilor O'Neill reiterated the need to understand the City's costs and the number of properties required to meet a breakeven threshold. Mr. Lazenby indicated that staff would bring related recommendations for Council to consider. In response to Councilor Gudman's request, Mr. Powell confirmed that the proposed May election would be decided based on a majority vote, rather than by "triple majority". Councilor Gudman noted that under the current policy, staff does contact owners of nearby property along the sewer line when a neighbor initiates individual annexation for purposes of connection. Finally, he raised several concerns about the divisive effects of a policy that would impose numeric requirements for annexation by block. Councilor LaMotte discussed the need for a clarified sewer policy and reiterated that staff should recommend an efficient approach. Councilor Manz noted the need to make the approval process for capital improvement projects very clear in all outreach regarding annexation; immediate street improvements should not be an expectation in newly-annexed areas. Councilor Gudman requested that a one-page summary matrix be prepared that illustrates benefits and costs for both the City and the individual residents, to be provided both to Council and to the six neighborhoods. He reiterated his opposition to moving forward with the policy change. Following brief discussion of a"friendly sewer connection" policy (Recommendation No. 6), Mr. Lazenby indicated that staff could prepare a simple code revision for Council consideration. 8.2 Economical Housing Incentives Council Report Following an overview by Mr. Lazenby, Mr. Siegel noted that staff would conduct additional research on policy options for economical housing incentives, based on Council direction. He drew Council members' attention to the list of tools that had been discussed, outlined in the Council Report, asking that Council identify those they wished to pursue. Mayor Studebaker called for questions of staff. Councilor Kohlhoff observed that in her explorations, development agreements had been identified as the most effective tool in other metropolitan-area jurisdictions. Councilor O'Neill noted that residents have sensitivity to the overall costs of their housing, as demonstrated by comments related to the previous study session. He emphasized that new housing in Lake Oswego comes through the efforts of entrepreneurial people. The pressure to develop affordable housing, he indicated, should be brought to bear on the financial institutions that loan the money, rather than on the entrepreneurs who could build it. Mayor Studebaker expressed reservations about allowing more flexibility in design standards for affordable housing, given the community's consistent opposition to change in the development code. Councilor Manz discussed her reluctance regarding development of new workforce housing in areas of the city that already included affordable inventory, e.g., Lake Forest, Rosewood, and Mountain Park. For the time being, her preference was to focus on preserving that housing stock, utilizing incentives to be determined. City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 5 of 12 July 17, 2018 With regard to preservation of affordable housing, Councilor Buck asked about means for achieving this through public ownership and improvement of properties, potentially with grant funding. Mr. Siegel explained that regulations facilitating remodels rather than teardowns also presented opportunities, as discussed in Option 1 (Council Report, p 2). Voucher programs (Option 2)were another possibility, though they would present an administrative burden for a city of Lake Oswego's size. Councilor Buck expressed support for Option 1, and also for Option 8 ("inclusionary zoning" in new apartment developments) when incentives are included. He asked about the amount of SDCs relief or other measures that would be needed for inclusion of below- market units. Mr. Siegel indicated that staff could obtain additional information, but it would be unlikely that SDCs relief alone could make a project viable. Councilor O'Neill pointed out the need to determine how many houses would address the city's demand for affordable housing. He expressed concurrence with Councilor Manz's observation that the need for the housing would best be met through existing inventory, as opposed to new development. The City could designate likely areas, he suggested, with property owners offered incentives, e.g., a tax freeze. Mr. Siegel indicated that this might be feasible; he discussed existing policy examples whereby a jurisdiction can incentivize the owner of existing housing to offer deed-restricted affordable housing that would otherwise be market-rate housing. In response to Mayor Studebaker's question, he confirmed that this would involve expense to the City. Mayor Studebaker reiterated his concern, and discussion followed about the likely effectiveness of this and other incentives, potential impacts of the Metro housing bond, and the extent of the demand in Lake Oswego. Citing citizens' frequent comments, Councilor Kohlhoff confirmed that the community objects strongly to the teardowns; most would likely support maintenance of existing affordable housing. She observed that the Metro bond was targeted to benefit people at or below the 30% level of median household income, a demographic not significant in Lake Oswego. In contrast, Council's discussions of workforce housing had been focused on households below the 80% level; therefore, Metro's bond would have little or no effect on affordable housing in Lake Oswego. She expressed interest in a local housing bond measure (Option 5), asking her colleagues to keep an open mind on the possibilities. Councilor LaMotte discussed the variety of affordable housing types and locations in the city. While he did not endorse purchase of such properties by the City, he indicated that inevitably a current or future owner would propose improvements to existing properties. To maintain their affordability, the City needed to have supporting policy in place. Similarly, the City needed to be prepared with policy to support development of new housing, which he believed would best be done by nonprofit housing experts. The City's financial outlay need not be large, he indicated. The housing demand should be assessed now and Council should identify the best tools for supporting future proposals. Councilor Buck discussed the inadequacy of the regional supply of affordable housing and how the efforts elsewhere in the region would positively affect Lake Oswego in several ways. Measures taken by the City would have only limited impact on the region as a whole, but other contributions could be made: removing obstacles in the development process, ensuring that affordable housing was a component of a new urban renewal district, addressing the growing City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 6 of 12 July 17, 2018 need for senior housing. In particular, meeting the need for affordable housing on the lower end of the economic scale would promote greater diversity and benefit the community, he noted. Councilor LaMotte discussed the importance of addressing housing needs of those at mid-range income levels, i.e., 60-80% of median household income. The City could not hope to solve problems at every level, and he urged his colleagues to explore the few options that could make difference. Councilor Gudman noted the significance of Councilor Buck's point about development processes and costs. These factors were driving developers to pursue larger rather than smaller projects, a concern that the City would do well to bear in mind. Mayor Studebaker asked Council members to consider the workforce housing tools listed in the Council Report (Options 1 through 8), assigning each to either the "Remove from Consideration" or "Further Study" category. He conducted a straw poll and based the categorization on the preference of the Council majority, as follows: 1. Assess SDCs on homes that replace a demolished home. Councilors Kohlhoff, Buck, Manz, and LaMotte indicated support for further study (4 of 7 in favor). 2. Create a locally-funded rent voucher system. Removed from consideration (none indicated support). 3. SDC waiver/deferral for affordable multi-unit rental housing. Councilors Kohlhoff, O'Neill, Buck, Manz, and LaMotte indicated support for further study (5 of 7 in favor). 4. Amend current urban renewal plans to include workforce housing goals. After brief discussion, the consensus was to remove this option from consideration and to add an item to the list for possible inclusion in future, rather than current, urban renewal plans. 5. Local housing bond. Removed from consideration (none indicated support). 6. Use of other capital improvement funds. Removed from consideration (none indicated support). 7. Provide exceptions to specific design requirements for eligible proiects. All Council members indicated support for further study. 8. Reauire new apartment proiects to include some below-market-rent units ("inclusionary zoning"). Removed from consideration (Councilors Kohlhoff and Buck indicated support, 2 of 7). Finally, Council consensus indicated that all would be in support of adding an option to make affordable housing an element of a future urban renewal district. 9. CONSENT AGENDA City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 7 of 12 July 17, 2018 9.1 Resolution 18-32, A Resolution of the City Council of the City of Lake Oswego Approving a Collective Bargaining Agreement Between the Lake Oswego Municipal Employees Association (LOMEA), Local 1546 of AFSCME Council 75 AFL-CIO and the City of Lake Oswego Motion: Move to adopt Resolution 18-32. Council Report and Attachments 9.2 2018-2021 Pavement Management Program—2018 Pavement Projects—Work Order 267 Motion: Move to award a construction contract to Knife River Corporation Northwest for the 2018 Pavement Projects —Work Order 267 in the amount of$2,792,970.05. Council Report 9.3 Resolution 18-35, A Resolution of the Lake Oswego City Council Approving for Inclusion in the November 6, 2018 General Election Voters' Pamphlets an Explanatory Statement Regarding the Measure Submitted to the Voters Under Resolution 18-33 Concerning Amending the Lake Oswego Charter Relating to Posting Notices of Proposed Ordinances Resolution 18-36, A Resolution of the Lake Oswego City Council Approving for Inclusion in the November 6, 2018 General Election Voters' Pamphlets an Explanatory Statement Regarding the Measure Submitted to the Voters Under Resolution 18-34 Concerning Amending the Lake Oswego Charter Relating to Regular City Council Meetings Motion: Move to adopt Resolutions 18-35 and 18-36. Council Report and Attachments END CONSENT AGENDA Councilor Manz moved to adopt the Consent Agenda. Councilor Gudman seconded the motion. A voice vote was held, and the motion passed, with Mayor Studebaker and Councilors Manz, LaMotte, Gudman, Kohlhoff, O'Neill, and Buck voting `aye'. (7-0) 10. ITEMS REMOVED FROM THE CONSENT AGENDA No items were removed from the Consent Agenda. 11. COUNCIL BUSINESS City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 8 of 12 July 17, 2018 11.1 Neighborhood Enhancement Program Grant Awards Council Report and Attachments Mr. Siegel, serving as staff lead for this year's Neighborhood Enhancement Grant program, reviewed the background and purpose of the program, as discussed in the Council Report. Reporting that$600,000 had been granted over 15 grant cycles, he noted the program's focus on problem solving at the grassroots level as opposed to planning at a capital-improvement level. He summarized the 2018-2019 grant application submissions and then discussed the advisory committee and its review process, detailing the criteria that were applied (Report, p 2-3). The committee also discussed ways to best leverage the available funding in future years (Report, p 1) and made several recommendations, including one to allow funding over more than a single fiscal year for larger projects. Finally, he reviewed the list of grant proposals and outcomes (Attachment 1), providing details about the two for which approval was not recommended (Proposals 3 and 11). Councilor Manz requested clarification about approval of the Mountain Park HOA grant and the related footnote (Proposal 8). Mr. Siegel explained that, although the site is owned and maintained by the HOA, the committee had identified positive public value, including visibility from the public right-of-way, location at the headwaters of Springbrook Creek, and planned improvements by the HOA that would benefit wildlife habitat and other aspects of the community. As noted, the committee recommended that the grant guidelines be clarified for such projects. Councilor Buck questioned the recommendation against approval of the capital expenditure (Proposal 3). Mr. Siegel discussed some of the Committee's considerations, including the guideline provided in the Program Guide for small capital projects (Attachment 3, p 2-3 of 5). In ensuing discussion, Councilor Buck indicated that this should be clarified specifically in the program criteria. Councilor Manz suggested that a policy be considered that could make program funding contingent upon the applicant securing other grant monies, e.g., County funds. Mayor Studebaker moved to approve the 2018-2019 Neighborhood Enhancement Program grants. Councilor LaMotte seconded the motion. A voice vote was held, and the motion passed, with Mayor Studebaker and Councilors Manz, LaMotte, Gudman, Kohlhoff, O'Neill, and Buck voting `aye'. (7-0) 11.2 Stevens Meadows Property Purchase Council Report and Attachments Mr. Anderholm reviewed background and location of the property under consideration for purchase by the City, as discussed in the Council Report, highlighting the strategic placement of the property. This acquisition would nearly complete the public ownership of Pecan Creek and tributaries from its headwaters to the Tualatin River, he advised. Reviewing plans for the property and related funding, as discussed in the report, he emphasized the important opportunities for access to both the City's and Metro's parks/open spaces/natural areas. He noted that as the property includes a house built in 1903 and a small barn, assessment of historic significance City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 9 of 12 July 17, 2018 would be a part of the due diligence. Finally, he reviewed staff's recommendation that the City's share of the purchase price be funded through a combination of Parks SDCs and proceeds of the Kruse Way property sale, as detailed in the Council Report. In response to questions from Councilor Buck, Mr. Anderholm noted that the current owners have expressed some interest in components of the house at such time as it is deconstructed or demolished. They do not believe the house has historic significance nor is it shown on any County listing of historic properties; regardless of the determination that is made, the City's plans for parking and access would not be precluded, Mr. Anderholm indicated. Councilor Buck requested that the Historic Resources Advisory Board be asked for an opinion. He inquired about a separate commitment that he recalled being made to spend the full amount of proceeds from the Kruse Way property sale and a potential conflict with planned funding for this project. Councilor Gudman reminded Council of the key connecting pathway between Cooks Butte Park and Stevens Meadows. He noted that the City's cost of about $467,000 would be substantially less than the amount set in the Capital Improvement Plan, allowing more than enough for access improvements. The City would be well advised to move forward quickly on a recommendation regarding the historic merit of the property, he opined. The historic Shipley-Cook property at Atherton Drive and Stafford Road also might present a future opportunity, offering potential connection to other City-owned properties in the vicinity of Luscher Farm. He commended staff for the extended effort required to bring forward the current proposal. Councilor Manz noted the importance of addressing issues of traffic congestion on Childs Road in relation to ingress and egress from the property. Mr. Anderholm advised that the City would work through the County's process to identify and address issues of safe access before proceeding with parking or other changes to the property. Mayor Studebaker moved to authorize the City Manager to sign a Purchase and Sale Agreement to acquire this five acres of parkland. Councilor Gudman seconded the motion. Councilor Buck reiterated his concern about the Kruse Way property-sale proceeds, indicating that he recalled a commitment of the full amount to Waluga Neighborhood park improvements. Mr. Lazenby indicated that staff would check the record and follow up with an alternate funding recommendation, if necessary. A voice vote was held, and the motion passed, with Mayor Studebaker and Councilors Manz, LaMotte, Gudman, Kohlhoff, O'Neill, and Buck voting `aye'. (7-0) 12. INFORMATION FROM COUNCIL Mayor Studebaker announced that West Linn Mayor Axelrod had extended a meeting invitation from the Willamette Falls Locks Commission for July 18 to consider how to proceed on ownership of the Locks. He offered details to City Council members who wished to attend. Councilor Buck described the frustration of some Council members with the inadequacy of information being received from City management. Of particular concern, he noted, were inquiries received from constituents about published news item before these matters had been brought to City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 10 of 12 July 17, 2018 the attention of Council members; he cited a recent article about the City fireworks display as an example of how advance awareness would be helpful to Council. Mr. Lazenby explained that, while the City's press policy includes protocols for emergency or disaster situations, media relations are guided day to day by a best practice: directing the media representative to the staff member most familiar with the information. As city manager over 350 employees, he may well not be aware such situations himself. Some mechanism could be established to provide for a line of communication on such contacts, he indicated; however, it would be difficult to anticipate the exact content of media reports. If Council could reach consensus on a better approach, staff would willingly act on it. In ensuing discussion, Councilor O'Neill suggested that primary issues of concern related to topics that might be considered front-page news. Councilor Buck indicated general agreement, emphasizing that constituents expected Council members to be informed. Councilor LaMotte referred to an earlier agreement with staff that Council be kept apprised of the status of large development projects, citing examples; in addition to being kept informed, Council also needed to be mindful of any responsibilities regarding ex parte contacts or other concerns. Councilor Kohlhoff concurred that Council members should not be learning first from the media about matters of sufficient interest to merit news coverage. She preferred to first hear from staff via email, though recognizing that staff needed to be allowed some discretion. She also expressed agreement with Councilor LaMotte about the need for a certain level of awareness on projects. Councilor Gudman described his preference for contacting the media representative or the City Manager on those rare occasions when he has encountered a news item that he wished to follow up on. He indicated opposition to implementing policy that would create an environment of staff reluctance to communicate with media. Describing his approach for addressing constituents' questions, he noted that he did not regard this as a matter of concern. In the continued exchange, Councilor Buck emphasized that his desire was for good communication and the resulting trust and mutual respect that it fosters. Some Council members were requesting an increased flow of information from staff. While related policy could be developed, he indicated that his preference was simply for more information. Councilor Gudman raised issues of measurability if in fact a policy were to be implemented. More effective, he indicated, would be to convey the need for a higher level of communication from staff. Mr. Lazenby noted that clarification of the Council's expectations would be required, describing a possible need for additional internal procedures. Councilor Manz suggested an approach where the City Manager would contact Council if an issue rose to the level of disaster or disruption or would otherwise be characterized as front-page news; Council members would be invited to call him if they had questions. She did not endorse administrative requirements involving a significant amount of staff time, and she reminded her Council colleagues that they had a similar duty to communicate information to the City Manager. Mr. Lazenby pointed out that some latitude for staff judgment needed to be allowed, given the range of Council members' perceptions as to significance. Councilor LaMotte reiterated his request for updates on major development projects. He expressed concurrence with the front-page-news criterion and offered other suggestions related to media contacts, including the involvement of a department head as a determining factor. City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 11 of 12 July 17, 2018 Councilor Kohlhoff summarized the discussion to convey that Council is seeking a higher level of communication from staff, perhaps from a 10% to a 20-25% range. She expressed her belief that both staff and Council members had a good sense of what would constitute reasonable and expected communications. Councilor Gudman indicated that some challenges would remain. However, a system based on staff's judgment calls would be sufficient; any policy beyond that, he reiterated,would need to include measurable standards. Mr. Lazenby advised that staff would refine their current approach and asked for feedback on whether or not the desired communication level was being met. Councilor Manz announced the July 27 celebration of the 175th anniversary of the Oregon Trail being held in Oregon City. The dinner and concert would benefit the Willamette Falls Heritage Area Coalition. Councilor O'Neill reminded his colleagues of the City's next summer concert at Foothills Park, scheduled for July 18. 13. REPORTS OF OFFICERS No reports were made. 14. ADJOURNMENT Mayor Studebaker adjourned the meeting at 6:14 p.m. Respectfully submitted, �� &Mx4 r 1-.- Anne-Marie Simpson, City Recorder APPROVED BY THE CITY, COUNCIL: ON L r r , to 1 1 Kent Studebaker, Mayor City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Page 12 of 12 July 17, 2018