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April 2013 Arbor WeekApril 2013Urban & CommUnityForestry Continued on page 2 arbor Week April 7-13 Arbor Day is America’s National Tree Holiday, observed on the last Friday of April to celebrate the role of trees in our lives and to promote tree planting and care. In Oregon we celebrate an entire Arbor Week, which is held during the first full week of April. Learn more at www.arborday.org/arborday/oregon/. On April 2, the Lake Oswego City Council will proclaim April 7-13, 2013, as Arbor Week in Lake Oswego. Read the City’s Arbor Week Proclamation at www.ci.oswego.or.us/planning. it’s treemendoUs! lAke OswegO ArbOr week events Sunday, April 7 Heritage Tree Bike Ride Depart at 11:30 a.m. from Lower Millennium Park Plaza Kick off Arbor Week with a 13-mile bicycle tour of Lake Oswego’s Heritage Trees! We’ll take a hilly ride through Lake Oswego’s neighborhoods to visit some of the city’s oldest, grandest trees. The event also launches the 2013 100 Mile Challenge. Come learn about the Challenge and take a peek at the bike you could win if you sign up. A Bike Gallery mechanic will be riding along in case you have mechanical difficulties. For more information and to register, please contact Laura Weigel at lweigel@ci.oswego. or.us or 503-675-3730. Kick-Off Festival 1 to 3 p.m., Millennium Park Plaza Don’t miss this TREEmendous celebration, complete with a tree climbing demonstration, live music, free cake, and loads of prizes! You can also learn about opportunities to enhance the urban forest in your neighborhood, and ISA Certified Arborists will be on hand to answer your questions about tree care. Monday, April 8 Right Tree in the Right Place Workshop 6 to 7:30 p.m., West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way Participants will learn the “what, why, where, and how” of planting the right tree species in the right place. Read more about this free workshop on page 4. arbor day art Contest For kids Frog Pond Toys, located at 310 North State Street, is excited to sponsor the city-wide Arbor Day Art Contest for kids in pre-K through 5th grade. Trees are beautiful, clean the air we breathe, give us shade on sunny days, produce fruits and nuts, and so much more! What do trees mean to you? Use the official entry form to draw, color, paint, or otherwise create a TREEmendous work of art! Starting April 1, entry forms will be available at Frog Pond Toys, City Hall (380 A Avenue), the West End Building (4101 Kruse Way), and online at www.ci.oswego.or.us/planning. Submit your entry at Frog Pond Toys on or before Thursday, April 25. Winners will be chosen on National Arbor Day, April 26, and prizes will be awarded by the City Council on May 7. lAke OswegO ArbOr week events Continued from page 1 Tuesday, April 9 Heritage Tree Dedication 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., 208 Durham Street Visit the Old Town Neighborhood on your lunch break and celebrate Arbor Week beneath the crown of one of the community’s newest Heritage Trees, a 53-inch diameter Douglas fir. Learn more about the historic significance of Lake Oswego’s trees during a brief ceremony. Treats will be provided. Wednesday, April 10 Benefits of Trees Walk Depart at 12 p.m. from the rear of City Hall Discover the benefits of trees during this one hour walking tour through the Evergreen and First Addition Neighborhoods. During the leisurely stroll, we will stop at various trees and quantify the economic, social, and environmental benefits they provide to our community! Thursday, April 11 Tree City USA Celebration and Heritage Tree Dedication 12 to 1:30 p.m., Jean Road Fire Station The City is celebrating its 24th year of Tree City USA designation by the National Arbor Day Foundation. Stop by the Jean Road Fire Station, 4555 Jean Road, to learn more about what it means to be a Tree City and enjoy a snack while admiring another new Heritage Tree, a 39-inch diameter Oregon white oak. Friday, April 12 Plant a Tree, Free a Tree 3 to 4 p.m., Springbrook Park, near the Sundeleaf Drive entrance Students from Lake Oswego Junior High School will be planting native trees in Springbrook Park. Stop by to support their hard work and enjoy a walk along the gentle pathways through the trees in this beautiful natural area. You can also lend a hand and free a tree from invasive English ivy! Please bring work gloves and pruning shears if you have them. Saturday, April 13 Three Cheers for Trees with Penny’s Puppet Productions 11 a.m., Lake Oswego Public Library Trees are everywhere, but how much do we know about them? This delightful sing-along show is entertaining as well as educational! Performance made possible by the Friends of the Library. For more information about Lake Oswego’s Arbor Week events, contact Andrea Christenson at 503-675-3990. Hot oFF tHe Press! The City’s new Heritage Tree Brochure is now available. The City also has a number of brochures related to trees and other natural resources, including: • Right Tree in the Right Place • Invasive Tree Species Identification • Removing Invasive Plants • Tree Removal Guide Copies are available at City Hall and online at www.ci.oswego.or.us/ planning. User-Friendly Forms Did you know that most of the City’s tree-related application forms may be completed electronically by typing the necessary information into the PDF document? Applications must still be printed and signed by hand, but they may be scanned and submitted by e-mail or delivered to City Hall by mail or in person. These user-friendly forms, available at www.ci.oswego.or.us/ planning/trees, include the following: • Invasive Tree Species Removal Application • Tree Removal Permit Application • Type II Tree Removal Questionnaire • Tree Hazard Evaluation Form • Heritage Tree Application Heritage trees nOminAte A tree in HOnOr Of ArbOr week! Do you have a favorite tree of landmark importance because of its age, size, species, horticultural quality, or historic significance? The Lake Oswego City Council established the Heritage Tree Program in November 1997 to foster appreciation and increase awareness about the important role of trees in the city’s history and heritage. The goals of the Heritage Tree Program are to recognize and designate significant trees, to educate the public about the value and history of these trees, and to preserve and protect these trees as part of the city’s heritage. Anyone can nominate a tree on either public or private property for Heritage Tree status. If the tree is located on private property, the permission of the property owner is required. To nominate a tree, complete the Heritage Tree Nomination Form available at City Hall or online at www.ci.oswego.or.us/planning/heritage- tree-program. Planting tHe rigHt tree in tHe rigHt PlaCe Selecting the right tree species for the right place will help your new planting flourish. The new tree will become a long-term amenity for your property and the surrounding neighborhood, and you can avoid costly maintenance requirements and infrastructure damage. Answering these questions can help you select the most suitable and desirable tree species for your site: 1. Where do I want to plant the tree and how much growing space is available in that location? 2. What size (small, medium, or large mature height and spread) and form (crown shape) of tree will best fit the space provided? 3. Are there overhead or underground utility lines, sidewalks, driveways, courtyards, sports courts, or building foundations in the vicinity? 4. Does the site receive full sun, full shade, or part sun and part shade throughout the day? 5. Is the soil deep, fertile, and well drained, or is it shallow, compacted, and infertile? 6. Do I have time to water and prune the newly planted tree until it is established, or will I rely on a landscaping service for assistance? 7. Is my site exposed to frequent winds? 8. Are there other trees in the vicinity? Do I want to maintain consistency with the treed character of my neighborhood or select a tree that will increase species diversity? 9. Do I want the tree to provide shade or seasonal color, attract wildlife, act as a screen, or serve some other function? 10. Do I have a preference for evergreen trees or deciduous trees that lose their leaves? The City’s new brochure, Right Tree in the Right Place, available at City Hall and online at www.ci.oswego.or.us/planning/trees, describes nearly 200 tree species to help you select the right tree based on your answers to these questions. Are you unsure about some of the answers? Contact your local garden center, a consulting arborist, or a landscape architect. Receiving assistance from a professional before making a decision will save you time and money by planting the right tree in the right place the first time. Don’t forget to call before you dig - locate underground utilities before digging by calling 503-246-6699. Learn more about tree species selection, proper tree planting techniques, and long-term care and maintenance at a free workshop on Monday, April 8, at 6 p.m. See the back page for details, and call 503-635-0290 for free registration. You can also ask a local arborist for advice during the Arbor Week Kick-off Festival on Sunday, April 7, from 1 to 3 p.m. Friends oF iron moUntain Park Friends of Iron Mountain Park are hosting an invasive species removal work party on Sunday, April 21 from 1 to 3 p.m. Come learn about proper techniques for removal and restoration and admire the progress this passionate group of volunteers has made over the years. The work party will be in the far eastern section of Iron Mountain Park. For additional information, please contact Mike Buck at m.bucks@comcast.net. LOJHS Science Club planting at Springbrook Park in 2012 Volunteers help restore native habitat at Iron Mountain Park Information: 503-675-3990 www.ci.oswego.or.us Urban & CommUnity Forestry WorksHoPs For the seventh consecutive year, the City is pleased to offer a series of free Urban and Community Forestry Workshops for the public. Unless otherwise specified, workshops will be held at the West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way. Please call 503-635-0290 for free registration. Right Tree in the Right Place Monday, April 8, 6 to 7:30 p.m. Choosing the right tree for the right place is a decision that will benefit your property for decades to come. Before selecting a tree to plant, a number of factors should be considered to ensure that an optimum species is chosen for the site. Join ISA Certified Arborists Morgan Holen and Corey Nasewytewa to discover the what, why, where, and how of planting a tree. This workshop includes an indoor presentation and outdoor tree planting demonstration. Understanding Your Trees: Basics of Tree Biology and Structure Saturday, May 11, 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Learn about basic tree biology and structure so that you can better understand how to manage the trees on your property. From roots to canopy, discover what trees need to stay healthy and safe. This workshop will be led by ISA Certified Arborist Damon Schrosk, owner of Treecology. Landscapes that Lower Your Energy Bill Saturday, June 8, 10 to 11:30 a.m. Your garden and yard can be used to reduce your energy bills! This workshop will explore various vegetated and non-vegetated strategies to reduce energy demand inside your home using techniques appropriate for the temperate Pacific Northwest climate. Facilitated by Maria Cahill, owner of Green Girl Land Development Solutions, www.greengirlpdx.com. Tree Protection and Removal Permits Thursday, July 18, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Learn about the City’s tree code requirements for tree protection and removal permits with Code Enforcement Specialist Bill Youngblood and Associate Planner Andy Gulizia. Consulting arborist Morgan Holen will also be there to talk about tree protection plan implementation and working with contractors. This workshop includes an indoor presentation and outdoor demonstration with examples of tree protection fencing and signage, tips for measuring tree diameter, conducting exploratory excavation, and more. Invasive Plants and Trees Saturday, August 10, 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Does invasive species removal seem like an overwhelming task in your yard or neighborhood open space? Join Parks & Recreation Department staff Megan Big John and Natural Resources Planner Andrea Christenson to discover which trees, shrubs, and groundcovers are known to be invasive in Lake Oswego and learn techniques for proper removal and replacement with more desirable species. Garlic mustard is a noxious weed that outcompetes native plants for moisture, nutrients, and space. Free a tree From englisH ivy! English ivy is the most common invasive plant in Lake Oswego. It has no natural enemies, grows and reproduces quickly, and outcompetes native plants like wildflowers and ferns. Ivy also grows up tree trunks, which harms the tree’s health and increases the risk of it blowing over in a storm. But you can help! Free a tree from ivy this Arbor Week. Use pruning shears to cut the ivy vine at shoulder height. Pull the lower portion of the cut vine off of the tree trunk, and pull or dig out the attached roots. Clear at least a five-foot ring around the base of the tree to prevent re-growth up the trunk. The upper portion of the vine can be left on the tree because it will die back.