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May 2013 Cow Talesindex 1891 Cash Cow 2 1911 dairy Queen 2 1919 Cow Jubilee 3 1907 Cow Activism 2 1910 City Cows 2 1921 Mad Cows 4 Vacationing Cows 2 Cowabunga!2 Three-Cent Milk 4 Cow Lawn Mowers 2 1912 Cow Real estate 3 1923 Cow Country 4 1909 Field of dreams 2 1919 Having a Cow 3 1932 Cow Acres 4 1906 Little Mrs. Huges 2 1914 illiterate Cows 3 1964 Cow Robot 4 drinking the Milky Way 2 1921 Cow engineers 3 Cow Tales 4 SpeCiAL THAnkS Marylou Colver, with the help of erin O’Rourke-Meadors, has researched, lectured, and written extensively about Lake Oswego history. She is the author of Lake Oswego Vignettes: Illiterate Cows to College-Educated Cabbage and the founder of the Lake Oswego preservation Society, a 501 (c) (3) non- profit corporation. The Society’s website is www.lakeoswegopreservationsociety.org. WedneSdAy, MAy 1, 2013 Cow Tales nATiOnAL HiSTORiC pReSeRVATiOn MOnTH Unless otherwise noted, the photos used in this publication are from the Lake Oswego public Library collection online at www.ci.oswego.or.us/library/special/History.htm. pHOTOS A LigHT-HeARTed HiSTORy OF LAke OSWegO The ArT of The Cow Theresa Truchot, a local historian, related another cow tale during the iron era in her book, Charcoal Wagon Boy. The fictional account is based on the life of Charles Towt Dickinson, an Alto Park area resident, who worked in the iron industry as a young boy. Truchot tells the tale of a girl with an artistic bent named Bedie who had no money for drawing paper or pencils. Bedie improvised and used a calf as a canvas and a piece of charcoal as her medium. The only problem was that the “canvas” didn’t realize its important role and it sauntered off mid-creation. Illustration from Charcoal Wagon Boy by Theresa Truchot. 1888 Aggie Cobweb Oswego news in a May 17, 1888 Oregon City Enterprise article observes: “The new furnace is daily assuming shape and proportions, and we hope soon to see the black smoke belching from the tall chimney top.” This refers to the second iron furnace that was located in today’s Foothills area and, to set the record straight, the furnace did not actually belch black smoke. During Oswego’s iron era, the County’s pulchritudinous cows were also news worthy. In the same newspaper article the following notice appeared: “J. S. Risley has received another Holstein, which adds another animal to his fine herd. Aggie Cobweb was purchased from D. C. Steward and Son of Forest Grove and is a beauty.” Cow TAles: A lighT-heArTed hisTory of lAke oswego Oswego, the town’s name for over a century, was established in 1850, which pre-dates Oregon’s statehood and makes it one of the oldest towns in Clackamas County. The discovery of iron ore in the hills surrounding Oswego fueled the dream of Portland’s elite to manufacturer iron locally and this led to the industrialization of Oswego. Attracted by jobs in the iron industry, the town’s population grew to 97 by 1880. Almost every household had a cow so the ratio of cows to people was about even, probably for the last time in Oswego’s history. 1889 CATTle CAr Dora Headrick Brant recalled in In Their Own Words that she, along with her mother and five other siblings, arrived in Oswego in 1889. Her father, James E. Headrick, had come from Minnesota the previous year to work in the iron industry. Dora said, “They put all their belongings in a boxcar, their cows and everything they had, and shipped it out here.” Dora goes on to say, “But then, everybody had a garden. And we could have chickens and cows. The cows run [sic] loose over there in Old Town back of the schoolhouse there. Many a time we had to go and chase the cows in. And everybody did.” This gives new meaning to the term “milk run.” Cow snapshot from the Worthington family album. Photo courtesy of Sandy McGuire. 1893 keep Cows & CArry on The iron industry and many local businesses were shuttered by a nation-wide economic crisis known as the Panic of 1893, a depression that lasted four years. Oswego’s population dipped as jobs were lost and residents left to find work elsewhere. According to Mary Goodall in her book Oregon’s Iron Dream: “Neighbors shared with each other. Those who had cows and chickens, vegetable gardens and fruit trees were the lucky ones who helped the people who stayed in Oswego to weather the storm.” 1883 Milking Cows for All They’re worTh Alice and William Pomeroy lived on a farm atop Iron Mountain where William served as superintendent of the Prosser Iron Mine. William “Will” Pomeroy, born on May 26, 1868, was their eldest son. Will started keeping a diary in 1883 when he was 14 years old. His routine chores were chopping wood and milking the family cow twice a day. Many daily entries begin with “I was up at ½ past 6 fed & milked the cow.” A few times an escaped cow added variety to Will’s day. Monday, September 3, 1883 Hot, misty smoky [this would have been from charcoal making] I was up at 1/2 past 6 oclock or at 6 oclock Horace came from Portland with Willie Newsome. I shined my shoes then fed & milked the cow. then I went to school swept or helped sweep the school house. I was there early I sit with George in the same seat. I milked the cow But she ran away I tryed to get her home but could not get her Back. Boys sawed wood.Cow tails at the Luscher Farm milking barn. The Pomeroy boys from left to right: Thomas, James, and William and Horace seated below. VACATioning Cows One of the Oswego area’s four steamboat landings was known as “Morey’s Landing” because it was adjacent to Parker Farnsworth and Clara Morey’s 600-acre estate which later was subdivided into Glenmorrie. Clara was the wealthy widow of Edward Lawson Eastham. Eastham and Morey co-founded the Willamette Falls Electric Company, a precursor of Portland General Electric (PGE). In 1889 they pioneered the first long distance transmission of electricity in the United States. After Eastham’s death, Morey became president of the company. Clara and P. F. built a grand country estate; with an 11-bedroom house they called the “shack.” They landscaped the grounds with rockwork done by Chinese laborers and trees imported from all over the world. Years later, Herbert Yates retold this anecdote: “A strong family man, Mr. Morey also owned a cottage at Ilwaco, Washington with a yard large enough for a pasture for the family cow, which he took along [aboard a steamship] to provide milk for the children.” Morey’s Landing where the Morey family, and their cow, would board a steamship bound for Ilwaco, Washington. 1906 liTTle Mrs. huges, The lArd buCkeT, And More Arthur Jones recalled in In Their Own Words “There was a little Mrs. Hughes who lived over west--on [a] sort of small farm there—- and kept a cow and we used to buy milk from them in the early days of our living in Oswego [about 1906], and I had to carry the milk home. It was usually toward evening, and we carried it in a little lard bucket.” Vera Larson, another interviewee, remembered, “We were making a living off the cows and the cream and so we weren’t allowed to use cream at home, we used milk. Mother said we couldn’t afford to use it as it was our livelihood.” 1907 Cow ACTiVisM Sarah Ann Shannon Evans, a prominent Pennsylvania attorney’s daughter, was college- educated in an era when many women didn’t have that opportunity. Sarah came to Oswego when her husband, William, was hired by the Oregon Iron & Steel Company to oversee iron production at the second furnace. The family moved to Furnace Street in what is now the Old Town Neighborhood. Sarah eventually moved to Portland and her daughters stayed in the area and continued to contribute to the community. Sarah crusaded for and won many causes including insuring that milk was clean and untainted. Her activism led the mayor of Portland to appoint Sarah as the first female Market Inspector, a position she held for 30 years. In 1907 she fought for a laboratory to test milk for poisons and contaminants. Sarah was a dynamo who remedied many social ills in her lifetime. She tackled humane treatment of the insane, child labor laws, legislation that enabled the foundation of Oregon public libraries, as well as Oregon’s victory, after five unsuccessful campaigns, for women’s suffrage in 1912. Sarah Evans (second from the right) pictured with family members in front of the Pettinger house on Furnace Street. Cow lAwn Mowers Elizabeth “Bessie” Pettinger recalled in In Their Own Words that at one time in Oswego “Everybody had a cow; most everybody had a horse. They ran at large – every cow and every horse was a lawn mower! Automatic and perpetual motion.” Pettinger continues, “In time, it was during the first World War, a law was voted into effect to prohibit cattle from running at large. (Fred Morey still teases me for being against this restriction.) So the automatic lawn mowers gradually disappeared from Oswego’s streets and byways and vacant lots – the beauty of green grass and tall trees is gone, and thus civilization moves on. Or does it?” Three cow lawnmowers are at work, and one is lying down on the job, in this 1908 photograph of Durham Place (now Durham Street) in Old Town. 1909 field of dreAMs Baseball was a major sport in Oswego and team photos date back to 1905. Cows are such good sports that they even joined in a game of baseball from time to time. Since cows are used to being out in the field, they were natural outfielders. This 1909 photo shows cow outfielders on the baseball field that stood where the Oswego Village Center on State Street is today. 1911 dAiry Queen In 1972, Donald Meyer recalled his father’s dairy: “It was the first one in Oswego on Third between "A" and "B" streets. There were two lots there with a little house and a barn, which he rented. He lived there one and a half years in 1911, '12 and ‘13. That’s where the Graham’s bookstore is now. He sold milk and ice; went to Portland for ice by horse and wagon. He delivered milk quite a ways to Dunthorpe, Elk Rock, Riverwood and Oswego. About 1919 he got a Stuart delivery truck. Of course, it was second hand. It was right after the First World War and there weren't many new automobiles and trucks then. He delivered the route twice a day. About 1925 he discontinued his milk business. He still sold milk wholesale at the city dairy in Portland. It wasn't such hard work.” Frans Van Twisk, and company, at his farm on Knaus Road. 1891 CAsh Cow Lucien Middleton and Clara Livengood Davidson were hard- working Oswego area pioneers. Lucien was an accomplished carpenter and he built or helped build many houses, bridges, fences, and dams. He also farmed cherries, grapes, strawberries, potatoes, and apples plus he made vinegar and kept beehives. Lucien kept a diary chronicling the chores and events of his daily life in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Lucien notes in his diary for July 5, 1891: “I paid Melvin Carter $35 for a cow.” It’s estimated that $35 in 1891 is equivalent to about $893 in today’s dollars -- holy cow! Lucien and Clara Davidson in their later years. drinking The Milky wAy Lucile, Pauline, and Linus Pauling would customarily spend summers at their grandparent’s house, which still stands on Fourth Street in First Addition. Their grandparents, Charles and Adelheid, had moved to Oswego because he found work at the second iron furnace. Charles was later employed at the pipe foundry. Lucile remembered that “A barn stood at the back of the lot and when grandma was milking, you [Pauline], Linus, and I standing five or six feet away, would open our mouths for a squirt of the warm milk direct from the source of supply. Our clothes got as much milk as we did.” Linus Pauling later became a world-famous scientist who was a two-time Nobel Prize winner. When Linus was a grandfather himself, Arthur Robinson a former student and friend of Pauling visited him and told the following anecdote: “At dinner the night before, he had calculated the location of the center of the mass of a bottle of milk to amuse the [grand] children and himself. This is what happens when the family is together.” Linus certainly knew how to have a good time!The house in First Addition, which was the home of Linus Pauling’s grandparents. nATiOnAL HiSTORiC pReSeRVATiOn MOnTH, MAy 2013 -- 2 1910 CiTy Cows geT soMe respeCT The town of Oswego was 60 years old in 1910 when the vote to incorporate passed and Oswego officially became a city. Early city council meetings were held on the second floor of the Koehler House, which still stands on the corner of B Avenue and Second Street. According to Kenneth Davidson, Jerome W. Thomas, Oswego’s first mayor, who served from May through December of 1910, knew all of the cows by name. Encouraged by this, male cows hoped to serve on “steering” committees while female cows buttered up officials and townspeople alike. One of the measures on the December 5, 1910 ballot was, “Shall horses be permitted to run at large?” Cow freedom in the newly formed city went unquestioned for about 10 years until the city council passed an ordinance restricting them and their heyday came to an end. Early city council meetings were held at the Koehler House on the southeast corner of B Avenue and Second Street. 1912 Cow reAl esTATe Oswego Lake real estate initially wasn’t easy to sell. The west end of the lake, later to be known as Lake Grove, was considered a great place to picnic and camp, but not to live year-round. The lack of good roads and the untamed shoreline made view lots in Lake View Villas, dating from 1912, more desirable than those on the lake. Atchison- Allen’s real estate promotions offered a lake lot for $50 along with a purchase of an acre view lot. It was suggested that the lot on the lake could be used as a watering hole for the family cow.Atchison-Allen Company Lake View Villas advertising postcard. CowAbungA! Cows once lounged on the Oswego Landing beach and roamed freely all over town. The price of freedom was the possibility of running amuck. Early Oswego was a dangerous place for cows. Wandering cows were mired in the lake or they fell into the smoldering underground fire of the “charcoal dump.” The dump was located on the terrace behind the first furnace where ore and charcoal were stored in sheds. When the sheds caught fire, the charcoal dump continued to burn underground for years. Sallie Shannon Pettinger recalled, “The charcoal hill near the old furnace, sometimes set on fire by camping hobos so that it smoldered for days, became a hazard for cows, which in those days were permitted to graze wherever they wished, on hillsides or among the sweetbriar that cluttered the grassy streets.” Cow beach bums at the Oswego Landing. 1919 hAVing A Cow In In Their Own Words, Nellie Nelson Kyle recalled: “The cows ran at large until about 1919. They kept the streets grazed well. But a few people objected to the bells. Everyone knew their own cow’s bells. Practically everyone owned their own cows and had their own source of milk and butter. And until about 1919 or thereabouts, everyone had a pasture outside. The city put into effect that cows had to be restricted.” Bessie, the cow, pictured with Cora Bullock. 1919 Cow Jubilee In 1919, the Jersey Cattle Club held a jubilee to celebrate a member’s cow that had recently made a world’s record in production of milk and butter fat. The members toured Portland area farms including William M. Ladd’s Iron Mine Farm in Oswego. Along the way, the members, and the accompanying Oregonian reporter, quenched their thirst with beverages slightly stronger than milk. After waxing poetic about the “pensive eyes” and “loving nature” of Jersey cows, the reporter concluded: “It is said that a man who does not love a horse or a dog is only half born; let me say that any man or woman who does not love a Jersey cow never ought to have been born at all.”Iron Mine Farm advertisement. Image courtesy of the Lake Oswego Preservation Society 1921 Cow engineers The first wooden dam on the east end of the lake dates back to 1850 when it was used to harness power for A. A. Durham’s sawmill on Sucker Creek. Flooding washed out wooden dams and they continued to be rebuilt. In 1921, the Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Company was hired to remove the timber dam and construct a cement dam, which, although modified, is still in place today. On August 16, 1921, several cows and one horse supervise the dismantling of the timber dam to make way for the cement dam. Photo courtesy of the Lake Oswego Corporation. 1914 illiTerATe Cows On March 19, 1914, on behalf of the Oswego Woman’s Club, Committee Chair, Mary C. Smith, petitioned the Mayor and City Councilors for permission to install a public drinking fountain on the southwest corner of A Avenue and Front St. (now State Street). Drinking fountains were viewed as a strategy used in the temperance movement. The hope was to counteract the tendency of men to quench their thirst in saloons. Mary was also a suffragette and, in 1915, she was the first woman to run for Oswego city council. Her campaign was unsuccessful and a woman councilor was not elected until almost four decades later in 1954. In 1966 Kenneth L. Davidson said “I remember well the cows using the old drinking fountain at First [actually Front Street] and A, where a fellow had to take his turn with the cows to get a drink.” The situation was remedied by posting a sign that read, “No cows allowed beyond this sign.” Needless to say, cows couldn’t read and they continued to quench their thirst in the fountain. The 1914 letter requesting permission to install a drinking fountain. Image courtesy of the Oswego Heritage Council. nATiOnAL HiSTORiC pReSeRVATiOn MOnTH, MAy 2013 -- 3 nATiOnAL HiSTORiC pReSeRVATiOn MOnTH, MAy 2013 -- 4 HisTory snippeTs - BrougHT To you By THe CiTy of lake oswego City of Lake Oswego 380 A Avenue Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us 503-635-0257 1932 Cow ACres is The plACe for Me! The Ladd Estate Company opened a 50-tract development in 1932 and christened it “Forest Hills Acres.” The one- to three- acre parcels were located near Goodall and Knaus roads and the advertising tagline was “”Out of the City – Into the Country.” A real estate brochure touted, “it is ideal of the raising of flowers, fruits, berries, vegetables and nuts, and in addition enables people to raise chickens and have a cow for their own use.” 1923 Cow CounTry Club William S. Ladd initially brought the “cream of the crop” of Jersey cows to Oregon and he was the wealthiest man in the Pacific Northwest when he died in 1893. His son, William M. Ladd also loved cows and he could afford the life of a gentleman farmer. Gradually the family’s Ladd Estate Company converted their Portland area farmlands into residential districts. In 1912, when Crystal Springs Farm was slated to become Eastmoreland, Westmoreland, and part of Reed College, the purebred, prize- winning herd of 225 Jersey cows was relocated to Ladd’s Iron Mine Farm in today’s Lake Oswego. Ladd’s livestock, with fanciful names such as “Merry Miss Oonette,” “Darling Glow Crews,” and “Sultan’s Birdie,” lived on the farm until at least 1921. By 1923, it was announced that Iron Mine Farm was to be converted into a golf course. By 1925, a half million-dollar investment had transformed the former cow pasture into the Oswego Lake County Club. The Forest Hills residential district surrounding the golf course was also developed as part of the “Live Where You Play” vision. A prominent attorney, quoted in a Ladd Estate Company brochure, exclaimed “One should live life every day – not just over the week end. I feel that I live two hours more each day that I live in the Lake Oswego district.” Iron Mine Farm envelope featuring a Jersey cow. Image courtesy of the Lake Oswego Preservation Society. Three-CenT Milk According to Glee Gear, in the 1930s the Springbrook school board realized “… that there was a real need for that [free lunches] – rich community or not. There were a lot of people living here and there were children without food.” She continues, “That was during the Depression, mostly in 1932 and 1934. We had it [a refrigerator] for two years and gave free lunches. Of course, we had to buy the milk, but we gave it to them at cost, which was three cents a carton.” An Oswego school student in 1923 touting the health benefits of milk. Cow TAles From 1880 to 1965, the subject of cows has been milked for all it’s worth. Here ends Lake Oswego’s cow “tails” because now you’ve “herd” it all! Rudie Luscher milking a cow in 1965. 1964 Cow roboT In 1960 the entire lake was brought into the city limits and the community was renamed “Lake Oswego.” Eventually many of the small dairies and farmlands were developed into commercial and residential districts. Cows became scarce in Oswego and people bought their milk in bottles or cartons from grocery stores. In 1964, a cow actually visited the Big “C” Market on State Street where the Oswego Village Shopping Center stands today. It was a mechanical cow robot with a robot milkmaid at its side. The cow, along with 62 other animated animals in this “circus,” was precision-made in West Germany. The meat packer, Armour and Company, sponsored the event which local newspapers billed as “A real treat for the whole family.” Milking the cow robot at Lake Oswego’s Big C Market in 1964. 1921 MAd Cows, russiAns, And peAnuTs Charlie “Peanuts” Didzun got his nickname because he habitually carried a pocketful of his favorite snack. “Peanuts” served as one of Oswego’s early Marshals and he recalled, “I was Marshal about 1921 or ‘22. I was real young. I was supposed to pick up the cows. I went out one time and got a cow and put it in the pound. There were lots of Russians living back up there in Oswego. And one of them knew I had his cow in the pound, and he got mad, and he came down and I thought he would kill me. A fellow called me on the phone and said, "Carl [sic], you had better lock the door. This Russian is going to come down and kill you for putting that cow in the pound." So I laid my gun and handcuffs down on the counter and just left city hall. I said, "I’m done with this job. I don’t do this job for no [sic] sixteen dollars a month and risk my life like that. And I quit right there.” “Peanuts” in 1914 prior to his brief stint as an Oswego Marshal.