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December 2013 Hello LODecember 2013THE OFFICIAL NEWSLETTER OF THE CITY OF LAKE OSWEGOHello 2 Your New Water System Landscaping Class Streetlight Retrofit Support Meals on Wheels The Value of Tap Water Board & Commission Vacancies 3 Parks & Recreation City Library Library Holiday Open House 4 8th Annual Lake Oswego Reads Greening the Holidays Looking for Alternative Heat? Community Calendar Insert Living 50+ For inFormation about the City and its serviCes, go to www.Ci.oswego.or.us or Call 503-635-0257.Inside O L *****ECRWSS***** POSTAL CUSTOMER Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID Permit 124 Lake Oswego, OR LET’S DONATE! The City of Lake Oswego is accepting winter clothing, toy and food donations for families in need living in Clackamas County. We will be collecting gently-used coats, mittens, gloves, scarves, and blankets, and new unwrapped toys. We continue to accept food donations, as we do throughout the year, and encourage folks to be especially generous at holiday time to help the many families in need this year. Donated items may be dropped off at these convenient sites: City Hall, West End Building, Adult Community Center, and Main Fire Station. Ranger Ben will also be accepting donations in person on Saturday, December 14, at 6 p.m. during the Christmas Ship Parade at Foothills Park, 199 Foothills Road. Stop by and meet Ranger Ben, and enjoy a sweet treat and the twinkling lights of the Christmas Ship Parade. COUNCIL OPEN HOUSE & COMMUNITY RECEPTION INVITATION FROM THE MAYOR On behalf of the City Council, I invite you to join us for an Open House/Community Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Willamette Room at the West End Building on Wednesday, January 8. Later that week, the Council will meet to set goals for 2014. In preparation, I hope we can engage as a community in small group discussions. Rather than formal testimony, we invite you to drop in, visit with us in a relaxed setting at round tables, have a cookie, and share your thoughts for the upcoming year. • What do you want the Council to focus on in 2014? • What can we do to help foster the things that make Lake Oswego great? • What issues or opportunities should we keep in mind as we set goals for 2014 and beyond? We also welcome your input via email to CouncilDistribution@ci.oswego.or.us and through Open City Hall. On behalf of my Council colleagues, we look forward to visiting, collaborating, and exchanging ideas to further enhance the City. SHOP AND ENJOY LAKE OSWEGO A WORD FROM MAYOR STUDEBAKER As you and your family celebrate the holiday season, remember to celebrate and support our local small businesses and the contribution they make to our local economy and community. According to the United States Small Business Administration, there are currently 28 million small businesses in the United States. They represent more than 99 percent of American companies, create two-thirds of the net new jobs, and generate half of private gross domestic product. Locally-owned businesses not only build strong communities by sustaining vibrant town centers and contributing to local causes, they also support other local businesses - architects, designers, sign makers, accountants, insurance brokers, attorneys, and others that help run it. Money spent in Lake Oswego creates far more of a return to Lake Oswego than money spent in communities adjoining Lake Oswego. So, this holiday season I invite you to explore Lake Oswego’s business districts for your gift shopping, dining and entertainment. Lake Oswego offers a wide range of unique goods and services with friendly, personalized customer service. Enjoy! WIZER BLOCK - UPDATE DRC PUBLIC HEARING PLANNED FOR JANUARY In September, the Evergreen Group submitted its Development Review application to begin the formal process for reviewing and approving the proposed project for the Wizer Block (also known as Block 137). The City’s Planning Department is in the process of reviewing the application to make sure it’s complete and ready for consideration by the City’s Development Review Commission (DRC). Once the application is deemed complete, it will go to the City’s DRC for consideration. DRC's review will determine if the project meets the City’s Development Code requirements, including those relating to the number of stories, proposed exceptions, traffic impacts and parking requirements. DRC’s review will also include a public hearing – an opportunity for citizens and interested parties to learn more about the development and the design details and to provide input. The public hearing is expected to take place in early January 2014. For more information about the proposed development, please go to www.ci.oswego. or.us/lora/block-137-development-wizer-block. STREETLIGHT OUT? Have you noticed a streetlight that is out, flickering, or on all day? If so, Lake Oswego Public Works has made it easy to get it repaired! Here’s what to do: • Look for a map and pole number on the light pole. It should say something like: 10D – 4A, Pole No. xx. • If the pole has a Portland General Electric (PGE) tag, you can report a streetlight outage and other repair problems directly to PGE. You can also report a light out by emailing lightout@pgn.com or leave a message on the service district voicemail at 503-736-5710. • If the pole doesn’t have a PGE tag, call Public Works at 503-635-0280 to report the outage. • Provide as much information as you can about the location, especially pole numbers, adjacent addresses, and side of the street. HOLIDAY MARKET & MISTLETOE MERRIMENT 5 TO 8:30 P.M., FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, AND 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M., SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7 The City and the Lake Oswego Mothers Club have partnered to present this merry affair at the West End Building (4101 Kruse Way). Saunter through the aisles and shop for wonderful holiday gifts, wares, and decor. Warm up for the holidays with yuletide cheer from World Class Wines, indulge in sweet treats and cuisine from local food vendors, and enjoy festive entertainment.Continued on page 2 Continued on page 2 Skip O’Neill City Councilor 503-781-7664 (Cell) Lauren Hughes City Councilor 503-734-6925 (Cell) Kent Studebaker Mayor 503-201-2270 (Cell) Jeff Gudman City Councilor 503-780-1524 (Cell) Donna Jordan City Councilor 503-675-1120 (Home) Jon Gustafson City Councilor 503-348-5191 (Cell) Karen Bowerman City Councilor 503-858-5983 (Cell) 2 City Council 503-635-0215 503-697-6594 (fax) City Council e-mail: council@ci.oswego.or.us City Manager Scott Lazenby 503-635-0215 BOARD & COMMISSION VACANCIES The City is seeking applicants for the Library Advisory Board and the Natural Resources Advisory Board. For more details, go to www.ci.oswego.or.us/boc/boards- commissions-vacancies or contact the City Manager’s Office at 503-635-0215. Applications can be filled out online. YOUR NEW WATER SYSTEM IS TAKING SHAPE From the River Intake Pump Station (RIPS) on the Clackamas River, to the Water Treatment Plant (WTP) in West Linn and pipeline work in Lake Oswego, your new water system is taking shape. Lake Oswego Pipelines: Exploratory drilling work will begin in Waluga Park, Quarry Road and Douglas Way in early December to carefully locate utilities so that they can be avoided during pipeline construction. The East Waluga Park parking lot will be used as a staging area for the pipeline installation and will be closed to the public starting mid-December to the end of February 2014. Water Treatment Plant: The underground reservoir has been excavated to its ultimate depth of nearly 30 feet. Pile installation will begin next week to ensure all structures remain in service in the event of an earthquake. River Intake: The first level wall forms were installed in preparation for the first concrete pour in late November. Additional levels will be added to contain the pumps and mechanical equipment needed to deliver water to the treatment plant. THE VALUE OF TAP WATER A REMINDER FROM THE CITY OF LAKE OSWEGO AND THE AMERICAN WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION If only the water faucet could talk to us. It might remind us how often we turn to it for safe water to drink, to wash our clothes, to prepare our food and to provide us with the quality of life we enjoy. It might remind us that the water pipes below our streets make so many everyday conveniences possible. Lake Oswego residents pay less than a penny ($0.0064 based on 2013 average use) for each gallon of high quality water delivered to their home. By comparison, a 16-ounce container of bottled water costs about $1.00 or 625 times the price of LO tap water. The true value of safe tap water cannot be quantified, considering all that customers receive when turning on the tap. 1. A safe water supply is critical to protecting public health. Without our modern water systems, diseases such as cholera and dysentery would be a part of everyday life. 2. Safer than bottled water. United States water utilities monitor for more than 100 contaminants and must meet close to 90 regulations for water safety and quality. Tap water providers, including Lake Oswego, must meet higher water quality standards and test for more contaminants than bottled water providers. 3. A successful society relies on safe water. Low mortality rates, economic diversity, productivity, and public safety are all related in some way to access to safe water. 4. Water for fire suppression. One of your city’s important responsibilities is to maintain sufficient water storage and pressure for fighting fires. These storage and flow requirements are a critical factor in how our reservoirs, water pipes and pump stations are sized. Tap water is so much a part of our lives that it is hard to imagine a day without it. STREETLIGHT RETROFIT PROVIDING LONG-TERM BENEFITS On October 22, the City Council approved a project to retrofit 1,415 of the City’s streetlights with LED fixtures. With a total of 3,680 City streetlights, this would be the first of two phases of the retrofit project. The proposed first phase is to retrofit 1,415 streetlights (of similar style and wattage) with LEDs over a one-year period with the project starting in January 2014. This phase accounts for about 40% of the overall project and is estimated to cost $470,000. The annual savings is expected to be about $110,000 per year in energy savings and lower maintenance costs. In addition, the City anticipates getting an Oregon Trust Grant for approximately $65,000. This equates to a payback of less than four years. The second phase, anticipated to start in the summer of 2015, will include the remaining 2,082 streetlights in the system and cost approximately $1.25 million. Phase two will have an annual savings of $120,000 per year with a payback of about 10 years. This phase is expected to be completed in the fall of 2017. The cost for LEDs has come down substantially in recent years. For some types of lights, the LED fixture is cheaper than the older high-pressure sodium lights. As compared to the old lights, LED lights have the following benefits: • Provides a better quality of light that shows colors more brilliantly. • Illuminates roadways better which may improve safety for drivers, cyclists, and pedestrians. • Creates less light pollution that will allow the sky to be darker. • Promotes sustainability as LEDs last 4 to 5 times longer and use between 55% and 70% less energy. • Improves visibility in residential areas which may add security. As a separate project, the City has installed 26 LED lights on Eagle Crest Drive with an ornamental-style light fixture. The City has installed 6 LED lights on Monroe Parkway and will install 4 more soon. Lastly, PGE owns 42 lights in the City and has installed LED lights on 38 of them. Before and after on Eagle Crest. The light in the forefront is the old light and the one in the background is the LED. First level wall forms at river intake. LANDSCAPING CLASS DID YOU KNOW WINTER IS THE BEST TIME TO PLANT NATIVE SPECIES? On December 15 from 1 to 3 p.m., learn about watersheds, soil, invasive species and native plants as well as the Backyard Habitat Program. Cindy Ellison, Site Technician with the Backyard Habitat Certification Program in Lake Oswego, will be teaching a free "Landscaping for Conservation" class at the Tryon Creek State Park Nature Center, 11321 SW Terwilliger Blvd. After the class, attendees will take a walk in the park to look at plants. Please register for this free class at www. tryonfriends.org. For more information, contact Cindy at 503-697-7892. SUPPORT MEALS ON WHEELS ENTERTAINMENT BOOKS NOW AVAILABLE! Enjoy savings at hundreds of restaurants, hotels, vacations and more while helping to support the Meals on Wheels program in Lake Oswego! The proceeds from each book benefit home-delivered meals for seniors right here in Lake Oswego. Just $20 for the 2014 Portland area Chinook Book and $25 for the Entertainment Book! All proceeds from the books go to support Meals on Wheels for seniors and persons with disabilities. These perfect gifts are available at the Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, 505 G Avenue, now until mid-December. On Saturday, there will be additional activities for families and tots with Frog Pond Toys & Lily Pad Café providing crafts for youngsters. Plus, capture the magic of the season by taking photos with a very special guest from the North Pole (proceeds benefit Lake Oswego Youth Action Council). The event also features a special visit from the Lake Oswego Fire and Police Departments at 10 a.m. Guests can also enter to win a magnificent raffle item. Don’t miss out on this joyful winter event! Join us for the Holiday Market and celebrate the most wonderful time of the year. For more information, visit www.ci.oswego. or.us/parksrec or call 503-675-2549. MARKET Continued from page 1 DONATIONS Continued from page 1 The donations will be distributed through our partnership with several non-profit organizations, including the Oregon Food Bank. Please make your donations by noon on December 20 to allow time for delivery before the holidays. For more information, please contact Diana Smith-Bouwer in the Citizen Information Center at 503-635-0257. For more information call: Main Number, 503-636-7628 Reference Desk Number, 503-675-2540 or visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/library 3 y o u r C o m m u n i t y r e s o u r C e F o r i n F o r m a t i o n a n d e n r i C h m e n tCITY LIBRARY d i s C o v e r a C t i v e l i v i n gPARKS & RECREATION West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way For more information, call 503-675-2549 or visit www.lakeoswegoparks.org PROGRAMS FOR ADULTS First Tuesday Music Series-Eric John Kaiser Tuesday, December 3, 7 p.m. Come to the Library for an evening of French and English ballads by French native and Portlander Eric John Kaiser. His latest songs resonate now with a very American rhythm, like bouncing across the vast plains on horseback… some western lap steel guitar... some dirty roadhouse. Visit the Library this Holiday Season Check out the array of holiday books available, including storybooks for children and books on holiday crafts, cooking, and traditions. Pick out some movies to watch with visiting relatives, audio books to listen to during vacation travel and music CDs to soothe your nerves during shopping trips. Gift Idea In Their Own Words, a hardbound book, containing oral history interviews captured in the mid-1970s, and a treasure of local stories, sells for $35 at the Library. Third Tuesday Author Series – Jill Timmons Tuesday, December 17, 7 p.m. Jill Timmons, author of The Musician’s Journey: Crafting Your Career Vision and Plan, will speak. Timmons has performed internationally as both a solo pianist and ensemble artist. As an artist/teacher, she has offered performances and educational residencies on three continents. Library2Go Appointments Learn how to get ebooks from your library and use them on your devices! Individual appointments are available throughout the month of December. Call the Reference Department to schedule an appointment. Sign up for free classes for adults held at the Library: • Adult Craft: Make a Holiday, Birthday, or Greeting Card! • Search the Internet with Google. For dates and times, call 503-675-2540. PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN Children’s Storytimes are special reading adventures tailored for a range of ages. Baby Storytime (birth - 18 months) Tuesdays at 11:45 a.m.; Toddler Storytime (19 months - 3 years old) Wednesdays at 11:45 a.m.; Preschool Storytime (3 - 5 year olds) Tuesdays & Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. Storytime Break: December 12 through January 7. Special Series: Musical Laptime with Anne Clark Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. through December 12 Families with babies from birth through 18 months are invited to a series of musical laptimes presented by early childhood music specialist Anne Clark. “Fay the Fairy and the Fir Tree” with Penny’s Puppet Productions Saturday, December 14, 11 a.m. Newton, a little fir tree, wishes on a falling star for more beautiful pine needles. Fay the Fairy grants his wish, but does the change make him happy? This adaptation of a classic folktale includes humor and music. Penny Walter has been bringing kids puppet fun for 10 years and, she teaches puppetry classes for teachers, professionals, and families. PROGRAMS FOR TEENS Teen Gaming Friday, December 6, 3 to 5 p.m. Gamers in grades 6-12 are invited to test their skills playing video games to be determined. Tournament play is a possibility, depending on attendance. Plenty of snacks! Register at loteen@ci.oswego.or.us or call 503-697-6580. Knitting in the Library Saturday, December 7, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. New to knitting? Love to knit and want to meet other knitters? All knitters, beginners to experienced, ages 10 and up, are invited to knit at the Library. It’s a great way to enjoy the craft of knitting and meet some new friends. For more information, email loteen@ci.oswego.or.us. Teen Writers Group Monday, December 16, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Teen writers in grades 8-12 are invited to develop their skills at the Library's Teen Writers Group facilitated by Tiah Lindner, a writer, editor, teacher, and practicing poet. Participants should come prepared to write, share, and experience the art and craft of writing. For information, contact us at loteen@ci.oswego.or.us. Talia Dugan HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE Featuring live entertainment and holiday refreshments, the Lake Oswego Public Library’s annual Holiday Open House is on Wednesday, December 11, from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. • At 1 p.m., Three Pound Note, a duo of ex-pats from England, will perform traditional English folk music. In celebration of the season, they will present a special program of winter songs. • At 3 p.m., Talia Dugan (clarinet) and her mother, Renee Dugan (keyboard), will perform assorted holiday music, both instrumental and vocal. FREE THE TREES The Parks & Recreation Department would like to thank the Friends of East Waluga Park, Iron Mountain Park, Southwood Park (Westwood HOA), and Springbrook Park for the dedicated effort to remove ivy from trees in our natural parks. The “Free the Tree” concept started as a non-organized effort in Springbrook Park. Members would clear one tree a day on their daily walk. Friends of Iron Mountain Park have continued this effort by pledging to remove ivy from 1,000 trees in Iron Mountain Park. To date, all of these efforts have freed well over 500 trees throughout the Lake Oswego park system from English Ivy. Do you want to join the effort? Wonder how to start? The first and most important step to restoring our natural parks is “air gapping” trees. This is the process of cutting ivy at breast height from the tree trunk, removing ivy to the foot of the tree and clearing ivy around the base of the trunk as far as you can go. The more you clear around the base, the more time you have bought the tree! This simple act saves a tree from the life-threatening ivy. If you are interested in helping our friends groups with freeing the trees and other stewardship opportunities, contact Ryan Stee at rstee@ci.oswego.or.us or 503-697-6575. HORSE DRAWN CARRIAGE RIDES On Saturday, December 7, from 4 to 8 p.m., savor the sights and sounds of the holiday season with a memorable carriage ride through the First Addition neighborhood. Snuggle under the blankets and enjoy the magic of the majestic horses and twinkling lights. Rides start at the Adult Community Center, 505 G Avenue. Carriage ride costs: Adults (18 and over) $3, Youth (0 – 17) $2. CHRISTMAS SHIP PARADE Saturday, December 14, at 6 p.m. marks the 59th year of the magical Christmas Ship Parade! This holiday tradition began in 1954 with a lone sailboat from the Portland Yacht Club. Today, up to 60 boats are expected to make up the two fleets which make their way to Lake Oswego. They depart from RiverPlace Marina and continue as far as George Rogers Park in Lake Oswego, arriving between 6:15 and 6:30 p.m. Make plans to enjoy the sparkle of the colorful flotillas from the shores of Foothills Park. A warm fire in the park shelter will guard you from the frigid winter temperatures. Event is dependent upon weather and river conditions. For additional information, visit www.christmasships.org. LO FITNESS Come experience Nia Nia is a sensory-based movement practice that leads to health, wellness, and fitness. Join this barefoot class where students learn to move more naturally, to explore the movement potential of the body, and to get fit without pain. Nia has 52 moves that optimize the body's natural design. Step into Nia and positively shape the way you feel, look, think, and live. There are several classes offered throughout the year. Join in on the fun at the upcoming Nia Try-It-Out Days. Ages 14 and older, Sunday, January 12, 8:45 to 9:55 a.m. and Tuesday, January 14, 5:40 to 6:40 p.m. Winter Indoor Playground This is an ideal program for parents and caregivers during the rainy and cold season. Rain or shine, our toys are divine! This playground is a dream come true for imaginative and energetic kids. Children will find lots of room to run and play. Come to the West End Building where adults and children proceed directly to Indoor Playground set-up in the Willamette Room. Sign in and pay the fee directly to the program attendant. Parents must supervise their children. Please do not bring snacks containing nut products to Indoor Playground. This is a drop-in program, co-sponsored by PLAY Boutique and Lake Oswego Parks & Recreation. Ages 0 to 6, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., drop-in fee $5 (additional sibling $3). A 10-visit punch card is also available for $40. SIGN-UP FOR SOME HOLIDAY FUN! There are several Holiday classes offered this season to keep you busy. Visit www.lakeoswegoparks.org for dates and times. Featured Holiday Class! Holiday Manners. Just because the word "cotillion" is no longer heard does not mean etiquette is no longer important! Develop excellent social skills by learning considerate and respectful behavior toward others and become a leader. Ages 5 to 8, Friday, December 6, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., $35. Make a Holiday Smoothie Add fresh produce to your morning and create a drink that aids digestion and adds energy to your life. Using seasonal fruits and vegetables, learn to create smoothies throughout the Holiday season! Peppermint, pumpkin, and even eggnog flavors add another dimension to a healthful and cheery beverage! Ages 18 and older, Thursday, December 12, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., $21. 44 This newsletter is printed on 100% recycled content paper, using soy-based ink. Citizen Information Specialist and HelloLO Editor Bonnie Hirshberger 503-675-3992 bhirshberger@ci.oswego.or.us For inFormation about the City and its serviCes, go to www.Ci.oswego.or.us or Call 503-635-0257. Event dates are subject to change. More details are available online at: www.ci.oswego.or.us/calendar. For more information, call 503-675-3992. December 1 Sunday 2 Monday • DRC Meeting, 7pm 3 Tuesday • City Council Regular Meeting, 6:30pm • Library Music Series, 7pm 4 Wednesday 5 Thursday 6 Friday • Blood Drive, City Hall, 9:30am-3pm • Holiday Market & Mistletoe Merriment, WEB, 5-8:30pm 7 Saturday • Tryon Creek Forest Market, 9am-4pm • Holiday Market & Mistletoe Merriment, WEB, 10am-4pm • Horse-Drawn Carriage Rides, ACC, 4-8pm 8 Sunday • Tryon Creek Forest Market, 9am-4pm 9 Monday • Deadline for returning Fill a Stocking, Fill a Heart stockings • Planning Commission, 6:30pm 10 Tuesday • LORA Meeting, City Hall, 6pm 11 Wednesday • Library Holiday Open House, 12:30- 3:30pm • NRAB Meeting, 6:30pm • HRAB Meeting, 7pm • LAB Meeting, 7pm • TAB and TSPAC Meeting, 7pm 12 Thursday 13 Friday 14 Saturday • Christmas Ship Parade, Foothills Park, 6pm 15 Sunday • Landscaping for Conservation Class, Tryon Creek, 1-3pm 16 Monday • SAB Meeting, 6:30pm 17 Tuesday • Library Author Series, 7pm 18 Wednesday • PRAB Meeting, 6:30pm 19 Thursday 20 Friday 21 Saturday • Mayor and Neighborhood Chairs Meeting, City Hall, 8:30am 22 Sunday 23 Monday 24 Tuesday • CITY OFFICES CLOSED, 12-5pm 25 Wednesday • Christmas - CITY OFFICES CLOSED 26 Thursday 27 Friday 28 Saturday 29 Sunday 30 Monday 31 Tuesday • CITY OFFICES CLOSED, 12-5pm January 1 Wednesday • New Year’s Day - CITY OFFICES CLOSED 2 Thursday 3 Friday 4 Saturday 5 Sunday 6 Monday 7 Tuesday • LO Reads Kickoff event, Library, 6:30pm • City Council Regular Meeting, 7pm 8 Wednesday • Library Performing Arts Series, 1pm • Council Open House & Community Reception, WEB, 5:30-7:30pm Community Calendar ACC Adult Community Center DRC Development Review Commission HRAB Historic Resources Advisory Board LAB Library Advisory Board LONAC Lake Oswego Neighborhood Action Coalition LORA Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency MPP Millennium Plaza Park NA Neighborhood Association NRAB Natural Resources Advisory Board PRAB Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SAB Sustainability Advisory Board TAB Transportation Advisory Board TAC Transportation Advisory Council WEB West End BuildingGlossary8TH ANNUAL LAKE OSWEGO READS CELEBRATION TO KICKOFF ON TUESDAY, JANUARY 7 Throughout February, with a kickoff at the beginning of January, the Lake Oswego Library will be celebrating the life and legacy of William Stafford through its annual Lake Oswego Reads celebration. The Oregon Library Association is sponsoring Oregon Reads in honor of Stafford’s centennial, and Lake Oswego will be joining organizations statewide in exalting this local legend. Lake Oswego holds a special place in William Stafford’s life given his long residence in the city and the signatures he left behind, including the Stafford Stones in Foothills Park. William Stafford (1914-1993) was born in Kansas and later moved to Lake Oswego. He died at the age of 79 after a long and prolific career. Over more than 30 years Stafford published in excess of 60 collections of poetry and prose spanning many genres including autobiography, biography, journals, and stories. Stafford is known for his themes of art, nature, and the consequences of violence. Four years spent in public service camps during World War II informed his investigations into the collective beliefs surrounding war. The Lake Oswego Library will be highlighting several of his works that will be available for checkout. Thanks to the Friends of the Lake Oswego Library, they will also be handing out 800 copies of the new book Ask Me, a compilation of 100 of Stafford’s most essential and definitive poems. Copies will be available at the kickoff on Tuesday, January 7, at 6:30 p.m. at the Library for Lake Oswego Public Library cardholders. The kickoff celebration will also include carrot cake, Stafford’s favorite, and music by fiddler Kathryn Claire. Lake Oswego Reads is sponsored by the Friends of the Lake Oswego Library, the Lake Oswego Women’s Club, Lake Oswego Rotary Club and the Lake Oswego Review. If you have any questions, please contact Cyndie Glazer at 503-675-2538 or cglazer@ci.oswego. or.us. For Lake Oswego Reads updates and a full calendar of events, visit www.lakeoswegoreads.org. LOOKING FOR ALTERNATIVE HEAT? BE WARM AND SAFE THIS WINTER Holiday decorations and winter storms that can interrupt electrical service, and cause people to turn to alternative heating sources, also contribute to the increased risk of fire in winter. On average, each year in Oregon there are 590 home heating-related fires that cause over $8 million in damage and kill or injure 16 people. Winter fires can be prevented! • Keep anything that can burn at least three feet away from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or portable space heater. The leading factor contributing to ignition for home heating fire deaths (51%) was heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattress, or bedding. • Have a three-foot “kid-free zone” around open fires and space heaters. • Never use your oven to heat your home. • Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional. Not cleaning your chimney is the leading cause of chimney fires from built-up creosote. • Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed. • Make sure portable space heaters are plugged directly into an outlet (not an extension cord). • Test your smoke alarms and make sure they are working. You need a smoke alarm on every level of the home, inside each bedroom and outside each sleeping area. • Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home. • Have a fire escape plan and practice it! GREENING THE HOLIDAYS For many of us gift-giving is an integral part of the holidays. This year, why not make your traditions a bit more sustainable. • Shop LO to find unique gifts of services (such as massage, music lessons, home organizing), dining and entertainment, and one-of- a-kind art, crafts, food, décor, and more. You’ll boost the local economy, plus save on fuel and time. And don’t forget to bring a reusable shopping bag! • Reduce waste and ensure that what can't be reused is properly recycled. According to the US EPA, Americans generate 25% more trash than usual between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. Get creative with wrapping, avoid buying overly-packaged items, use durable dishware when entertaining, and purchase well-made items that will last. • When the festivities are over, make sure to properly recycle your Christmas tree and consider donating unneeded items for reuse. Check the City’s calendar for local tree recycling events or contact Republic Services at 503-636-3011 for details on curbside tree recycling. Find more inspiration and ideas on greening your holidays, and resources for reuse and recycling after the festivities are done, at www.ci.oswego.or.us/sustainability.