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February 2014 Hello LOFebruary 2014THE OFFICIAL NEWSLETTER OF THE CITY OF LAKE OSWEGOHello 2 Thank You Contact Your Children Business Licenses Ray Montgomery Board & Commission Vacancies 3 Parks & Recreation LO Millennium Concert Band City Library 4 Springbrook Park Planting Project Child Safety Seat Clinic Radon “Brick by Brick” Installation Opening Community Calendar Insert Living 50+ For inFormation about the City and its serviCes, go to www.Ci.oswego.or.us or Call 503-635-0257.Inside O . O L . *****ECRWSS***** POSTAL CUSTOMER Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID Permit 124 Lake Oswego, OR LAKE OSWEGO READS WILLIAM STAFFORD JOIN US FOR A MONTH OF EXCEPTIONAL PROGRAMS, ENGAGING WORKSHOPS AND MORE! Please join us as Lake Oswego Reads takes part in the state- wide celebration of William Stafford’s centenary. Lake Oswego has a special place in the event as the author lived here in town for over 45 years. William Stafford was a poet, a pacifist, and a professor at Lewis and Clark College. As an author, Stafford is known for his straightforward language and inclusive warmth, seeking kindred connections with nature and his fellow man. The winner of a National Book Award for his poetry in 1970, Stafford held the position of Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, the precursor to his position as Poet Laureate. During Continued on page 2 WIZER BLOCK For the latest information about the proposed development for the Wizer Block (also known as Block 137), please go to www.ci.oswego.or.us/ planning/lu-13-0046-request-development-review- permit-construct-mixed-use-project. Continued on page 4 On Saturday, January 11, the City Council met together with the City Manager and Assistant City Manager to discuss Policies and Goals for 2014. The meeting was timely. It closely followed the Open House, held three days earlier, during which citizens were able to talk individually with the Mayor and City Council members to voice their opinions and suggestions on any city issue they chose. The morning was devoted to discussion and development of policies for the coming year. Obviously, there are policies which were not discussed and will remain, but the primary ones can be summarized as follows: • Preserve the character of existing, established residential neighborhoods using consultation with neighborhood residents, neighborhood associations, and individual property owners. • Maintain and upgrade existing facilities and capital assets. • Annexation of residential areas would be through “friendly annexation.” The City may take an active role in annexation of commercial or industrial property within its urban service area. • The City will actively encourage business and investment expansion by reducing regulatory barriers without sacrificing community aesthetics and livability, responding quickly to business inquiries, providing information that helps in business location decisions, and even considering financial incentives on a case-by-case basis. CITY COUNCIL DEVELOPS POLICIES & GOALS UPDATE FROM MAYOR STUDEBAKER Footbridge by Holly Gibson, 2011 Photo Contest Participant 100 MILE CHALLENGE 2013 GRAND PRIZE WINNERS ANNOUNCED The 2013 Lake Oswego 100 Mile Challenge has come to a successful conclusion. The Challenge provided active transportation information, tools, and incentives to encourage Lake Oswego residents and workers to leave the car at home and walk, bike, bus, or use another car-free option to get around. Throughout the Challenge, which ran from April through December, 156 participants logged over 16,627 active transportation trips totaling more than 113,400 miles (twice as many miles as the 2012 Challenge), reduced CO2 emissions by almost 73,000 pounds, and saved over 3,900 gallons of gasoline and $25,200. Fifty- three people logged 500 miles, which put them in the running for the 500 Mile grand prize – a new bike courtesy of the Lake Oswego Bike Gallery, with an additional 48 people logging 100 miles, which put them in the running for the 100 Mile grand prize, a $100 Patagonia gift card. The 500 Mile winner, Roman Repcak, commutes by bike between Tualatin and downtown Lake Oswego. Roman says, “Active transportation means exactly Continued on page 2 NEW RIGHT-OF-WAY TREE MAINTENANCE PROGRAM BEGINS Tree removal along Country Club and South Shore began this winter as part of a new program that addresses the deterioration of the City’s significant treed corridors. The program focuses on the removal and replacement of dead, hazardous, and invasive trees and vegetation along the City’s major right- of-ways that present a risk to public safety or infrastructure. The first year of the program concentrates on two high priority areas: the south side of Country Club Road between Iron Mountain and Boones Ferry, and the north and south sides of South Shore Boulevard. Following the removal of the dead, hazardous and invasive trees, invasive vegetation will be removed and appropriate replacement trees will be planted. TIRED OF JUNK MAIL? FREE SERVICE CAN HELP STOP THE CLUTTER More than 85 billion pieces of unsolicited mail get dropped in mail boxes around the country each year – about 100 pounds for every household. One of the best ways to reduce junk mail is with Catalog Choice, which offers a free, easy, online service to help stop the clutter of unwanted phone books, catalogs and mail. To get started, visit https:// oregonmetro.catalogchoice.org. If you prefer to opt out offline, request a kit that helps you say “NO” to junk mail - one phone call or postcard at a time. Contact the Metro Recycling Hotline at 503-234-3000 to have a kit sent to you. Here are a few more tips to help you lighten the load in your mailbox: • Ask companies you’ve done business with and organizations you’ve donated to not to sell or exchange your address. • Don’t use a store’s “buyer’s club” cards when making purchases or submit product registration cards. • Avoid participating in sweepstakes or contests unless you can prevent your information from being shared. For more information, visit www.oregonmetro.gov/index.cfm/go/by.web/id=743. Skip O’Neill City Councilor 503-781-7664 (Cell) Lauren Hughes City Councilor 503-734-6925 (Cell) Kent Studebaker Mayor 503-201-2270 (Cell) Jeff Gudman City Councilor 503-780-1524 (Cell) Donna Jordan City Councilor 503-675-1120 (Home) Jon Gustafson City Councilor 503-348-5191 (Cell) Karen Bowerman City Councilor 503-858-5983 (Cell) 2 City Council 503-635-0215 503-697-6594 (fax) City Council e-mail: council@ci.oswego.or.us City Manager Scott Lazenby 503-635-0215 BOARD & COMMISSION VACANCIES The City is seeking applicants for the following: • Parks & Recreation Advisory Board • Transportation Advisory Board For more details, go to www.ci.oswego.or.us/boc/boards- commissions-vacancies or contact the City Manager’s Office at 503-635-0215. Applications can be filled out online. DO YOU KNOW HOW TO CONTACT YOUR CHILDREN? Disasters and emergencies can occur at any time and your family may not be together. Power may be lost and cell phones may not work. Do you and your kids have contact phone numbers memorized or written down and available in your kid's backpacks or your wallet? Do you have an alternate plan to connect with family and friends? Do you know how to contact your children's school in the event of an emergency? Call a family meeting and make a communication plan: • Visit the FEMA library to download and print a Family Communications plan for Kids and Parents (www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/34330) • Visit the FEMA library to download and print an Emergency Supply Kit Checklist for Kids and Parents (www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/34326) • Know the facts about disasters for Kids (www.ready.gov/kids/know-the-facts) • Visit the FEMA library to download and print more facts about disasters (www.fema.gov/media-library/ assets/documents/34288) FAREWELL RAY MONTGOMERY: DECEMBER 13, 1967 - DECEMBER 29, 2013 Water Superintendent Ray Montgomery lost his battle with cancer on December 29. The City lost a dedicated employee and a wonderful human being. Ray will be sorely missed. Ray started with the city of Lake Oswego in April 2009 in the Public Works – Water Department, becoming Water Superintendent in December 2011. He was recognized by all as a friendly and approachable man, who demanded and expected high quality work from his staff and himself. He was responsible for implementing some much-needed improvements to the Water Operations Division and served as an important liaison to the Lake Oswego Tigard Water Project. Customer service was a top priority for Ray and his staff reflected his commitment to quality and timely service. What many did not know about Ray is the enormous amount of time he worked after hours to become the best superintendent he could possibly become. He achieved that in the short time he served as superintendent. Ray always saw himself as part of a team and never sought personal recognition. He also saw his marriage as a team. Even as he struggled to deal with cancer, he would say things like, “we are trying this treatment,” or “the doctor says we need to do this....” He is survived by, his wife Kristi; daughters, Cassie and Teri; and sons, Corey and Jim. this month-long memorialization, we will highlight the writing of this personable, local legend through several works that are sure to include something for everyone. His writings cover a wide variety of genres, especially poetry, which is noted for its use of common language and accessible style. Visit the Lake Oswego Library to begin your journey into Stafford’s world. Here are a few of the exciting programs coming this month: • Words That Burn: A Dramatization of World War II Experiences of William Stafford, Lawson Inada, and Guy Gabaldón in Their Own Words • Paula Sinclair Sings Stafford Poems • Presentation by Stafford Bibliographer Jeremy Skinner • Children’s Program: Little Big Foot Puppet Show • Lake Oswego Reads Bike Ride • Docent-Led Walk and Poetry Reading at the Stafford Stones by Anushka Nair • Film Screening of Every War Has Two Losers with Director/Producer Haydn Reiss • Henry Carlisle Poetry Reading • Meet the Illustrator of Everyone Out Here Knows: A Big Foot Tale, Angelina Marino-Heidel • Stafford Exhibit Tour with Doug Erickson • Stafford Literary Landmark Plaque Dedication • Hear Louisiana Poet Laureate Ava Leavell Haymon • Hear artist Dennis Cunningham speak about his linocut illustrations from Stafford’s short story, The Osage Orange Tree • Plus a William Stafford-inspired quilt display, and art and photograph exhibitions. For a full schedule of events, go to www. LakeOswegoReads.org. The 2014 citywide reading program, Lake Oswego Reads, is sponsored by: Friends of the Lake Oswego Library, Lake Oswego Review, Lake Oswego Women’s Club and Lake Oswego Rotary Club. LO READS Continued from page 1 MOUNT IT, FRAME IT, HANG IT The City of Lake Oswego renews over 2,000 business licenses each year. Business licenses - required if business is conducted within city limits - provide peace of mind, validation and credibility. Licenses also help ensure that business activity fits with location and zoning. License fees are based on the number of employees and range from $80 to $150 for new businesses, and $64 to $110 for renewals. Although all businesses require a license, fees are waived for non-profit organizations and businesses demonstrating less than $1,000 gross revenue on a calendar year basis. Last year, approximately 300 new businesses obtained a license. The City encourages you to support local businesses. Locally-owned businesses not only help build strong communities, they also support other local businesses - architects, designers, sign makers, accountants, insurance brokers, attorneys, and others that help run the business. 100 MILE CHALLENGE Continued from page 1 that. Being active in today’s sedentary world is crucial in order to give the human body much needed movement. Riding my bike to work helps preserve the environment plus I get to know my neighborhood from a different perspective. Every time I get to ride my bike I feel like a kid again.” Roman works as a personal trainer and his commuting by bike has motivated some of his clients to start bike commuting. He draws inspiration from John Fitzgerald Kennedy who said, “Nothing compares to a simple joy of riding a bike.” The 100 Mile winner, Rhonda Muhly, lives in Lake Oswego and commutes by bus to Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU). Rhonda says, “I simply use TriMet because it’s the most efficient way to commute to OHSU and leaves parking for those who need it most.” She finds that even with the cost of a transit pass, it is still a better alternative than paying to park on the hill. “Because there is an express bus to OHSU mornings and afternoons at peak hours, it is very easy to park at the transit station (either Tigard Cinemas or Barbur Blvd) and ride with friends 20 minutes to work. This also takes the stress out of driving up the hill in inclement weather.” She adds, “I have had a parking pass, been in a carpool, and ridden the bus for my 20+ years working in Portland. Taking the bus is definitely the best choice.” THANK YOU Thank you to the Lake Oswego community for participating in the Community Food, Toy and Coat Drive. Your generous donations were enough to supply over 200 meals, hundreds of toys and dozens and dozens of coats and blankets to help some of the neediest families in our community. These wonderful toys saved the day for many families and made the holiday season a little brighter for all. In a few cases, these donations of toys and coats were the only gifts families received this year. If you missed the opportunity to donate food, coats or blankets, and would like to make a donation, please visit City Hall at 380 A Avenue anytime Monday through Friday during normal business hours. The City collects food for the Oregon Food Bank all year and will continue to collect coats and blankets throughout the winter. If you have any questions, please call Diana Smith-Bouwer in the Citizen Information Center at 503-635-0257. For more information call: Main Number, 503-636-7628 Reference Desk Number, 503-675-2540 or visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/library 3 y o u r C o m m u n i t y r e s o u r C e F o r i n F o r m a t i o n a n d e n r i C h m e n tCITY LIBRARY d i s C o v e r a C t i v e l i v i n gPARKS & RECREATION West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way For more information, call 503-675-2549 or visit www.lakeoswegoparks.org SPORTS AND FITNESS Adult Coed Soccer Spring League registration is now open. Team registration and payment deadline is Thursday, February 27. Games begin Sunday, March 16, and are played late afternoons and evenings on Sundays. The team registration fee is $470 + $35/non-resident. FEATURED FITNESS CLASSES Tame Your Tension Release tension in the body through movement and breath designed to create gentle muscle tremoring which brings the body back to a more balanced state. Appropriate for all levels. Bring a blanket and yoga mat. Taught by Ryan Crosby, MSW, RYT. Ages 18 and older, Monday, March 3, to March 17, 7 to 8 p.m., $51. Yoga Drop-in Classes Join us on Mondays and Wednesdays for drop-in classes held at the Adult Community Center. Classes are appropriate for most people and offer a balanced yoga practice. The drop-in option allows flexibility. Purchase in 1, 5, 10 or 15-class increments. For more information, please visit www.lakeoswegoparks.org. THE YOUTH ACTION COUNCIL PRESENTS… High School Co-Ed Flag Football Join us for a season full of fun and football. Each team is guaranteed four games! Teams of 7 to 12 players, with 5 on the field at a time, will start their season on Tuesday, March 4, and end on Thursday, March 20. Games will be held on Tuesday and Thursday nights at Westlake Park. Don’t forget registration begins Monday, February 3, and registration ends Friday, February 21, at 4 p.m. Space is limited to eight teams so register early! For more information, visit www.LOteenscene.org or email teenprograms@ci.oswego.or.us. DANCE AT THE WEB! Did you know the West End Building offers a variety of dance classes for preschool, kids, teens, and adults? This spring there is something offered for everyone! Give your child a taste of dance in 2014. Sign-up for Tiny Boppers, Mini-Ballerinas, Modern Kids Dance, and Adult Tap. PROGRAMS FOR ADULTS Lake Oswego Reads William Stafford Lake Oswego takes part in the state-wide celebration of William Stafford’s centenary. During the month of February the Library, local schools, businesses and organizations will offer special programs connected with William Stafford. Visit www.lakeoswegoreads.org for the latest information and schedule. First Tuesday Music Series-Paula Sinclair February 4, 7 p.m. Sinclair will be singing William Stafford poems for this special event as part of Lake Oswego Reads. She began her music career at age 14 playing guitar and singing in a country duo in and around her native Kentucky. Today, living in Portland, she is an exceptionally adept solo performer, is part of a rhythmic duo and leads a band. Performing Arts Series-The Stomptowners Wednesday, February 12, 1 p.m. The Stomptowners is a dynamic group featuring traditional Irish instrumentation, voice and foot percussion. Expect to hear an exciting blend of foot stomping jigs, reels and hornpipes interlaced with melodic, soulful Celtic songs, feisty sea shanties and a few good pub songs. Having percussive dance adds a key visual component which sets the act apart from other traditional Irish bands. LO Reads Special Event-Louisiana Poet Laureate Ava Leavell Haymon Tuesday, February 25, 7 p.m. Haymon has published several poetry collections, her most recent is Eldest Daughter. Her poems have appeared in journals nationwide, and she is a committed teacher of poetry writing. William Stafford was a model for Haymon’s early poems, and she will discuss Stafford’s influence and illustrate by reading several of those poems. She is the winner of several prizes and is currently the Poet Laureate of Louisiana. Sign up for free classes for adults held at the Library: • Adult Craft: Make an Artist’s Book • Adult Craft: Decorate a Wooden Picture Frame • Beginning Keyboarding & Internet Searching Class • 24/7 Library: Searching Online Resources Call the Reference Department for dates and times at 503-675-2540. PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN Children’s Storytimes Special reading adventures tailored for a range of ages. Baby Storytime (birth - 18 months) Tuesdays at 11:45 a.m.; Toddler Storytime (19 months - 3 years old) Wednesdays at 11:45 a.m.; Preschool Storytime (3 - 5 year olds) Tuesdays & Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. Special Series: Musical Laptime with Colette Fallon Fridays at 10:30 a.m. Families with babies from birth through 18 months are invited to musical laptimes presented by early childhood music specialist Colette Fallon. “Little Bigfoot” with Penny’s Puppet Productions Saturday, February 8, at 11 a.m. Little Bigfoot is lost in the woods and the other animals want to comfort him while he tries to find his dad. This humorous musical adventure takes place in an enchanted forest. Penny Walter has been bringing kids puppet fun for ten years, and she teaches puppetry classes for teachers, professionals, and families. Lego Club for Grades 3-6 Monday, February 10, 4 to 5:30 p.m. Kids are invited to work on projects and learn more about LEGOs with Blair Amos, local LEGO maven. Materials are provided for this free program but registration is required, call 503-697-6580 to sign up. Find Bigfoot in the Library! A Scavenger Hunt Throughout February For more information, ask at the children’s room help desk. PROGRAMS FOR TEENS Knitting at the Library Saturday, February 1, 2 to 4 p.m. New to knitting? Love to knit and want to meet other knitters? All knitters, beginners to experienced, ages 10 and up, are invited to knit at the Library. It’s a great way to enjoy the craft of knitting and meet some new friends. For more information, email loteen@ ci.oswego.or.us or call 503-697-6580. Valentine Cookies Thursday, February 6, 7 to 8 p.m. Teens in grade 6 and up are invited to decorate Valentine cookies. Materials provided. For more information, email loteen@ci.oswego.or.us or call 503-697-6580. FOOD FOR FINES The Library’s annual Food For Fines program begins in February. This program enables Library users to have their overdue fines forgiven while helping those less fortunate. For every item of non-perishable food donated, the Library will waive 50 cents in overdue fines. The food is donated to the Clackamas Service Center. LAKE OSWEGO MILLENNIUM CONCERT BAND RECOGNIZED AS ONE OF THE TOP COMMUNITY BANDS IN THE NATION! At the recent Mid-West Band Clinic in Chicago, IL, the John Philip Sousa Foundation announced the Lake Oswego Millennium Concert Band would be one of two recipients of the John Philip Sousa Foundation’s Silver Scroll Award for 2013. This is the highest award a community band can earn and puts the Lake Oswego “Millennium Band” in a most prestigious group of community bands. Since the award was initiated in 1987, only 42 bands prior to this year have been so honored. The purpose of the Sudler Silver Scroll Award is to identify, recognize and honor those community bands that have demonstrated particularly high standards of excellence in concert activities over a period of several years, and must have played a significant and leading role in the cultural and musical environment in their respective communities. In addition, the band must have consistently selected and performed a high level of musical literature, and the conductor must have been incumbent in his or her position for a minimum of five years. Musical Director of the band, Dale Cleland, and his wife, Rosemary (a trumpet player in the band), were in Chicago to accept recognition of the award. The official award presentation to the Lake Oswego Millennium Concert Band by the John Philip Sousa Foundation will occur on February 23 at Lakeridge High School during their next concert. The concert starts at 7:30 p.m. No admission charge. The John Philip Sousa Foundation is a non-profit foundation dedicated to the promotion of international understanding through the medium of band music. 44 This newsletter is printed on 100% recycled content paper, using soy-based ink. Citizen Information Specialist and HelloLO Editor Bonnie Hirshberger 503-675-3992 bhirshberger@ci.oswego.or.us For inFormation about the City and its serviCes, go to www.Ci.oswego.or.us or Call 503-635-0257. Event dates are subject to change. More details are available online at: www.ci.oswego.or.us/calendar. For more information, call 503-675-3992. February 1 Saturday • Child Safety Seat Clinic, Main Fire Dept, 10am-1:30pm • LOReads - Ticket Giveaway to Hear Kim Stafford Speak, 11am 2 Sunday 3 Monday • LOReads - William Stafford Discussion Group, 3pm • LOReads - Words That Burn: A Dramatization of World War II Experiences of William Stafford, Lawson Inada and Guy Gabaldon in Their Own Words, 7pm • DRC Meeting, 7pm 4 Tuesday • City Council Regular Meeting, 6:30pm • LOReads - Paula Sinclair Sings Stafford Poems, 7pm 5 Wednesday • NRAB Meeting, 6:30pm • First Addition/Forest Hills Neighborhood Coordinating Meeting, 7pm 6 Thursday • LOReads - Art Unveiling, 6pm 7 Friday • Blood Drive, City Hall, 9:30am-3pm • LOReads - Lewis & Clark College Two- day Symposium, 3pm • LOReads - Centennial Celebration featuring Li-Young Lee and Ted Kooser, 7pm 8 Saturday • LOReads - Little Big Foot with Penny’s Puppet Productions, 11am 9 Sunday • LO Reads Bike Ride, Library, 12:15pm • LOReads - Docent-Led Walk and Poetry Reading, 1:30pm 10 Monday • Planning Commission, 6:30pm • SAB Meeting, 6:30pm • LOReads - Film Screening of Every War Has Two Losers and meet the Director, Haydn Reiss, 7pm 11 Tuesday • City Council Boards & Commissions Summit, 6:30-8:30pm 12 Wednesday • Library Performing Arts Series, 1pm • TAB Meeting, 7pm • LAB Meeting, 7pm 13 Thursday • LOReads - Enjoy Dessert and Hear Kim Stafford Speak, 6pm 14 Friday • LOReads - William Stafford Discussion Group, 1pm • Brick by Brick, ACC, 2pm 15 Saturday 16 Sunday 17 Monday • President’s Day - CITY OFFICES CLOSED 18 Tuesday • City Council Regular Meeting, 6:30pm 19 Wednesday • LOReads - Meet Illustrator Angelina Marino-Heidel, 11:45 • PRAB Meeting, 6:30pm • DRC Meeting, 7pm 20 Thursday • Class: The 24/7 Library, 10am • LOReads - Poetry Slam!, 3:30pm • Uplands NA Board Mtg, 7pm 21 Friday • LOReads - William Stafford Discussion Group, 1pm 22 Saturday • LOReads - Stafford Exhibit Tour with Doug Erickson, 10am 23 Sunday • Lake Oswego Millennium Concert Band, Lakeridge High School, 7:30pm 24 Monday • Planning Commission, 6:30pm 25 Tuesday • LOReads - Stafford Literary Landmark Plaque Dedication, 6:30pm • LOReads Louisiana Poet Laureate Ava Leavell Haymon, 7pm 26 Wednesday • LOReads - William Stafford Discussion Group, 7pm 27 Thursday 28 Friday Community Calendar ACC Adult Community Center DRC Development Review Commission HRAB Historic Resources Advisory Board LAB Library Advisory Board LONAC Lake Oswego Neighborhood Action Coalition LORA Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency MPP Millennium Plaza Park NA Neighborhood Association NRAB Natural Resources Advisory Board PRAB Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SAB Sustainability Advisory Board TAB Transportation Advisory Board TAC Transportation Advisory Council WEB West End BuildingGlossarySPRINGBROOK PARK PLANTING PROJECT On Saturday, March 1, from 9 a.m. to noon, join the Friends of Springbrook Park to plant native plants in an area of the park where invasive English Ivy has been removed. Meet at the trailhead near the Uplands School parking lot. Tools and snacks will be provided but if you have them, bring gloves and a shovel. If you wish to receive an email notification, please contact Jim Evans at jhevans@aol.com. CHILD SAFETY SEAT CLINIC The Lake Oswego Fire Department and the Lake Oswego Police Department hold free quarterly safety seat clinics open to all citizens. The next clinic will be on February 1, from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., at the Main Fire Station, 300 B Avenue. Certified Child Passenger Safety Technicians will check for correct installation, damage, recalls, and size and age appropriateness. Each seat takes about 30 minutes to check. Vehicle crashes remain the number one killer of children ages 3-14 in the United States. Child safety seats, booster seats and seat belts are the best occupant protection. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, placing children in age- and size-appropriate car seats and booster seats reduces serious and fatal injuries by more than half. “BRICK BY BRICK” INSTALLATION OPENING PROJECT REVEAL AND RECEPTION Last summer, the Lake Oswego Adult Community Center (ACC) inaugural fundraiser, “Brick by Brick”, kicked off with more than 100 bricks being purchased by community members, businesses, members and supporters. Many wonderful sentiments were expressed on individual bricks: wedding dates were memorialized, special thank yous extended, and “things your dad told you but you ignored until now” were all a part of the engraving on individual bricks. The ACC collaborated with an Eagle Scout who designed a project of a brick courtyard on the north side of the ACC, adjacent to the Fitness Center – a beautiful, accessible gathering area with a gravel path. At 2 p.m., February 14, brick donors are invited to a special program themed “We Love our Donors” for the project reveal and reception. RSVPs would be appreciated, call 503-635-3758. The photo shows the more than seven cubic yards of material removed to prepare the area for the bricks. COUNCIL GOALS Continued from page 1 • Any new fees or taxes, or expansion of an existing fee, will only be considered if the fee or tax will be dedicated to a specific purpose. After the lunch break, the Council was joined by City Department Directors. The Directors gave information or advice about Council goals that were developed as a result of the policy discussion. The major goals that followed from those policy decisions include: • Balance community demand for City services and facilities with the goal of keeping City taxes and fees affordable. • Balance the goals of community aesthetics and environmental quality with the preservation of property rights and individual freedom. • Improve the City’s infrastructure to meet current standards and provide for managed growth. • Build the tax base by supporting business investment in Lake Oswego Some of the minor goals include the following: • Review the role and scope of citizen advisory boards and make any necessary changes • Inventory the availability of community meeting spaces in the City • Inventory recreation facilities and activities (both public and private) available to residents • Adopt a procedure for filling council vacancies • Consider the provision of volunteer coordination services, particularly in natural areas This was a very collegial, yet productive effort. We hope it is evident that this Council is making every effort to be good stewards of the City’s resources. We are attempting to consider all of the concerns presented to us by our citizens, and we are appreciative of the civil way in which those concerns are made known to us. RADON - 2ND LEADING CAUSE OF LUNG CANCER Radon - a naturally occurring radioactive gas that you can’t see, smell or taste - has been found in homes throughout the United States. It comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water and gets into the air you breathe. Radon typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation. Its presence in your home can pose a danger to your family’s health. Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in America and claims about 20,000 lives annually. Any home can have a radon problem - new or old, with or without basements. Nearly 1 out of every 15 homes in the United States is estimated to have an elevated radon level (4pCi/L or more). The only way to know if you have high levels of radon in your home is to test for it. Radon levels are most commonly measured in picocuries per liter of air (pCi/L). The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends taking corrective action if the radon levels in your home are 4pCi/L or higher. You can hire a radon measurement company to test your home or perform the test yourself. Visit the State’s website at www.healthoregon.org/radon, for contact information and a list of measurement companies.