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July 2014 Hello LOJuly 2014THE OFFICIAL NEWSLETTER OF THE CITY OF LAKE OSWEGOHello 2 WEB Sale Process Art & Antique Faire CPR Anytime SW Employment Area Plan Development Code Updates Board & Commission Vacancies 3 Parks & Recreation Learn To Row Day City Library 4 Rox in Sox Star Spangled Parade Railroad Property and the Law July 4th Road Restrictions Community Calendar Insert Outdoor Recreation For inFormation about the City and its serviCes, go to www.Ci.oswego.or.us or Call 503-635-0257.Inside O . O L . *****ECRWSS***** POSTAL CUSTOMER Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID Permit 124 Lake Oswego, OR Continued on page 2 93 DAYS OF SUMMER THE FUN HAS BEGUN! There is no shortage of fun things to do in Lake Oswego during the summer. Don’t miss out! Using facebook and Twitter, we are going to share many entertaining and exciting things you can do during the 93 days of summer! So grab your sunscreen and get ready to spend summer in Lake Oswego! You can access these 93 Days of Summer by going to City of Lake Oswego’s Facebook page (City-of- Lake-Oswego-Local-Government) and “Like”ing it, or by following us on Twitter. Take an awesome photo at one of the events? Share it! You can also email it to bhirshberger@ci.oswego. or.us and we’ll share it on facebook... or submit it in the City’s annual photo contest! For contest details, visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/publicaffairs/photo-contest. PHOTO CONTEST Photographers are invited to enter their best images in the Sixth Annual City of Lake Oswego Photo Contest. Send in your best photos for a chance to win! Entries need to be submitted by 5 p.m., Thursday, September 4. For contest details, please visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/publicaffairs/photo-contest. STATE OF THE CITY BY MAYOR STUDEBAKER Accountability, outcomes and trust are key ingredients as our Council and citizens collectively establish a Lake Oswego that is fiscally strong, has a sound infrastructure and preserves a harmonious city character. Since January 2013, and with some changes in direction from previous Councils, we have worked with you through a formal Community Attitudes Survey, through a Town Hall, through an Open House and through public comment periods at every meeting, to get your input and set our annual goals. In short, we as Lake Oswego City Council, are operating in a goldfish bowl. So let me describe our progress in meeting some goals in several categories. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY Our goal is to build our assets without raising your property tax rate. So: • We have been through two cycles of extensive review of our budget by the Citizens Budget Committee. By making sure our priorities are correct and closely examining the need for expenditures, we have a plan to maintain and build our assets without raising the property tax rate. • We sold city-owned property on Furnace Street and at the Armory to raise $1.5 million. • We set up reserve funds in the budget for things like renovation of the Operations Center. It allows us to avoid borrowing large sums of money for needed projects by waiting until we have built large enough reserves. A MATTER OF BALANCE SENIOR SAFETY SUMMIT – AUGUST 5, 9 TO 11:30 A.M., AT CITY HALL, 380 A AVENUE Many older adults restrict their activities because of concerns about falling. Join us as OHSU Neurology Department once again partners with the City to present the evidence-based Matter of Balance - training looks at multiple areas and assists people in developing a fall prevention plan. Plus get tips on senior safety and an exercise handout. Snacks provided. The event is free but space is very limited. To register, call the Adult Community Center at 503-635-3758. BLOCK 137 (WIZER) DEVELOPMENT The developer for the proposed Block 137 (Wizer) development has recently submitted a revised application to address concerns raised at prior Development Review Commission meetings. The revised plan has three separate four-story buildings including 36,500 square feet of quality retail and 207 higher-end residential units. The project will stay below the 60-foot height limitation for downtown. The project would include 397 parking spaces on two levels of below-grade parking and 26 adjacent on- street parking spaces. Of these, 268 spaces will be for residential use and 155 parking spaces for the retail uses, both well above the amount of parking required by the City. The City will lease 135 of the retail spaces to provide for additional public parking in downtown. The revised project still includes an east-west public walkway between First and Second streets, and a north-south walkway connecting Evergreen to the east-west walkway. Once the application is finalized, the Development Review Commission will hold a public hearing, which is tentatively scheduled for Monday, July 21. To confirm the hearing date and learn more about the proposed development, please go to the City’s project website at: www.ci.oswego.or.us/planning/lu-13-0046-request- development-review-permit-construct-mixed-use- project. NO SUMMER VACATION FOR CONSTRUCTION Many public utility, paving and water projects are occurring over the summer. Please allow extra time when traveling for detours and flagging around construction zones, and obey signage and flaggers in work zones, so that everyone has a safe summer. Here are some highlights of projects occurring in July: KERR PARKWAY – CLOSURE The City’s largest street preservation project includes almost two miles of paving plus drainage upgrades that will improve water quality. Sidewalks and pathways will also be repaired and new pedestrian walkways will be built to improve safety and connectivity. Various segments will be closed 24 hours per day, from one to four weeks each, between June and October. Once each segment is reopened, crews will move to the next segment. After all other work is complete, the entire road will be repaved. During the final paving, expect to see one-way traffic with flaggers. For more project information - including closure timelines for various sections of Kerr - or to sign up for email updates, go to the City’s project webpage: www.ci.oswego.or.us/publicworks/kerr-parkway- rehabilitation-project. Rendering of proposed Wizer Block development: View from First Street Continued on page 2 Skip O’Neill City Councilor 503-781-7664 (Cell) Lauren Hughes City Councilor 503-734-6925 (Cell) Kent Studebaker Mayor 503-201-2270 (Cell) Jeff Gudman City Councilor 503-780-1524 (Cell) Donna Jordan City Councilor 503-675-1120 (Home) Jon Gustafson City Councilor 503-348-5191 (Cell) Karen Bowerman City Councilor 503-858-5983 (Cell) 2 City Council 503-635-0215 503-697-6594 (fax) City Council e-mail: council@ci.oswego.or.us City Manager Scott Lazenby 503-635-0215 STATE OF THE CITY Continued from page 1 • We decided to sell the WEB, and eliminate our present annual cost by approximately $1.5 million. • We embarked on a project to replace our street lights with LEDs. By the end of 2014, we will have replaced 62% of the lights (about 2,200 lights) and will have paid for that cost in a little over 3 years. After that, we will be saving hundreds of thousands of dollars a year in electrical costs. • The water project is huge. We have established an oversight committee to monitor progress and expenses. Additionally, we sold part of our water capacity that we do not need to the city of Tigard for a sum of $20 million. That will keep rate increases to our citizens to a much lower level. • Personnel costs are a big part of the General Fund. In the 2013-2014 year, we cut personnel by 10 full-time employees. The coming budget proposes a cut of another 2-1/2 full-time employees. We will continue to review our employee needs, keeping in mind that we want to provide the personnel needed to furnish the services you feel are necessary. INFRASTRUCTURE • You will have noticed much roadwork. Some of that is for the new water pipe. But the Budget Committee set aside $700,000 last year and $900,000 this year to repair and maintain our streets. We will continue to do that. • A deteriorating Kerr Parkway is getting rebuilt this year. • The Boones Ferry Project is finally getting started with design work this year. PRESERVING CITY CHARACTER • We continued funding the Arts Council in the amount of $100,000 annually for three more years. • The Luscher Farm Master Plan was adopted. • The City Code was amended to allow for the placement of farm stands in various zones. This was done particularly to accommodate the move by the Parsons Farm stand to the WEB property during construction on Kruse Way Village. MAJOR PROJECTS • This year we completed the three-year process of revising and adopting the City’s Comprehensive Plan. This Council made it more of a land use document and less of a vision statement. We made sure it would not be a tool to increase density in residential areas, and that it acknowledged the existence and use of motor vehicles for the majority of transportation in the City. • The Council has embarked on revising the Sensitive Lands program to remove as much regulation of private property as we can. The revision should be completed by the end of this year, and it is our expectation that it will be done in such a way that Metro will sign off on it. • Possible projects for the future are a closer look at the Development Code, reviewing the tree code, moving the City’s dispatch and communication center (LOCOM), and development of the city’s southwest industrial area. As a Council with goals, we have had a very productive 18 months. As a Council and a staff, we have had knowledge, experience and responsiveness. As a Council and community, we have had openness and civil discourse. We will not agree 100% of the time, but I know that we can collectively get the right balance between everyone’s vision for this great city and what is achievable. Certainly on Council we have a wide range of outlooks, but our working relationship has been as harmonious as anyone could ask for. I know that Council and Oswegans can go forward with openness and civility. I know that Lake Oswego will continue to be strong and admired. LEARN TO SAVE A LIFE WITH CPR ANYTIME! Join the Lake Oswego Fire and Police Departments for a special hands-only CPR Training! At the Sounds of Summer Concert at Foothills Park on Wednesday, July 23, from 6:30 to 8:15 p.m., Public Safety Officers will teach the basics of CPR Anytime - a unique program developed by the American Heart Association that teaches the core skills of CPR in just 25 minutes. Participants will learn to recognize the signs of cardiac arrest, have the opportunity to practice on mannequin Mini Anne and learn the steps necessary to save a life. For additional information, please contact Jamie Inglis at jinglis@ci.oswego.or.us or 503-675-3985. PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT CODE UPDATES The Planning Commission is scheduled to hold public hearings on proposed updates to the City’s Development Code. Updates include: • Amendments that are intended to simplify and update sections of the Code that allow adjustments or variances to code standards and regulate nonconforming structures and uses – July 28 Planning Commission Hearing. • Amendments that would bring the Code into compliance with State requirements for clear and objective housing approval standards intended to reduce unnecessary costs and delays in permitting needed housing – August 11 Planning Commission Hearing. • Other amendments for the purpose of clarifying and updating various code provisions – July 28 Planning Commission Hearing. For more information and to track updates, please check http://www.ci.oswego.or.us/planning/ development-code-updates or contact Sarah Selden at 503-697-6524. LAKE OSWEGO ART & ANTIQUE FAIRE SATURDAY, AUGUST 2, 10 A.M. TO 3 P.M. We are pleased to announce the revival of the Lake Oswego Art & Antique Faire! The event was held previously in downtown Lake Oswego and this year is moving “uptown” to the Adult Community Center located at 505 G Avenue. We’re excited to restore this time- honored event and pleased to have a beautiful new venue for shoppers to discover exquisite art and timeless treasures. The event will feature over 40 local art and antique vendors, delicious food and outstanding music by Sally Harmon and Frank Gruner. Fred Squire, local antique dealer for over 23 years in Lake Oswego, will be on hand to appraise your cherished possessions. Because the event runs simultaneously with the ever popular Farmers’ Market at Millennium Plaza Park, you can park your car and enjoy complimentary shuttle service between both venues. The shuttle will run every 20-25 minutes from 10 a.m. through 3 p.m. All proceeds from this event will support the programs and services of the Lake Oswego Adult Community Center. SW EMPLOYMENT AREA PLAN APPLY TO SERVE ON ADVISORY COMMITTEE The City Council is seeking community members to serve on an advisory committee for the Southwest Employment Area district plan project. The advisory committee will meet approximately five times over one year to help develop a plan for the commercial and industrial area at the southwest corner of Lake Oswego. Applications can be filled out online and are being accepted through July 11. ADDITIONAL BOARD & COMMISSION VACANCIES INCLUDE: • Budget Committee • Youth Members of Advisory Boards For more details, go to www.ci.oswego.or.us/boc/boards- commissions-vacancies or contact the City Manager’s Office at 503-635-0215. SALE OF WEB MOVING FORWARD The City Council recently approved an agreement to sell the West End Building and the adjacent 1.3-acre City- owned open space parcel to The Great Tomorrow for $20 million. Local resident and developer, Nick Bunick, who is the President of The Great Tomorrow, an Oregon non-profit corporation, is purchasing the property to provide headquarters for other corporations associated with a cure for cancer and other health and humanitarian- related projects. Mr. Bunick has also expressed interest in allowing the City to continue to use the West End Building for its Parks and Recreation programs and offices. The sale of the property is contingent on Mr. Bunick’s inspection of the property and securing financing. Closing could occur later this summer. LAKE OSWEGO TIGARD WATER PARTNERSHIP WATER PROJECTS – ROAD CLOSURES • Iron Mtn. Blvd. will remain closed between Fairway Road and Summit Drive through July. When that work is completed, Iron Mtn. Blvd. will be closed between Summit Drive and the traffic circle at Upper/ Lakeview/Iron Mtn. for water pipeline work. • Douglas Way will be closed during work hours (7 a.m. to 6 p.m.) to through traffic during July as pipeline work occurs. • Erickson St/Laurel St: various segments of the road will be closed to through traffic starting late July through August as pipeline work progresses. For questions, contact the Lake Oswego Tigard Water Partnership at 503-697-6502 or lotwater@ci.oswego.or.us. Your patience is appreciated during construction. ROAD WORK Continued from page 2 For more information call: Main Number, 503-636-7628 Reference Desk Number, 503-675-2540 or visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/library 3 y o u r C o m m u n i t y r e s o u r C e F o r i n F o r m a t i o n a n d e n r i C h m e n tCITY LIBRARY d i s C o v e r a C t i v e l i v i n gPARKS & RECREATION West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way For more information, call 503-675-2549 or visit www.lakeoswegoparks.org PARKS & REC SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM The Lake Oswego Parks & Recreation Department offers partial scholarships for City and School District residents needing financial assistance. Resident applicants may receive up to 50% of the cost of a program, up to a maximum of $50 per class, maximum $160 per person per fiscal year (July 1-June 30) and a maximum of $300 per fiscal year per family. The scholarship program is dependent upon donations from groups and individuals and a limited amount of funding is available. Many thanks to the generous online donations of class participants and to our major sponsors Lake Oswego Women's Club and LO Mom's Club. Application can be found online at www. lakeoswegoparks.org. MOVIES IN THE PARK Celebrate Summer with an outdoor movie at Millennium Plaza Park. Plan a fun family outing or enjoy a romantic evening by watching a movie larger than life! Bring your blankets, pillows and low sand chairs for a relaxing night under the stars. Delicious popcorn, cotton candy, and other treats will be available for purchase. Movies in the Park is tons of fun for all ages. Thanks to Bull Mountain Heating, AC and Insulation for supporting this community event. • July 24 - Super Buddies (G) • July 31 - Despicable Me 2 (PG) • August 7 - The Karate Kid 2010 (PG) • August 14 - The LEGO Movie (PG) SKATEBOARDING CAMPS For all levels! Learn the basics or improve your skateboarding skills. Enjoy a combination of instruction and supervised free skating with Camp instructors. Bring your own board, pads, and helmet. Parent or an adult must be on-site to help supervise six year-old campers. For dates and times, visit www. lakeoswegoparks.org. Learn-To-Skate Nights A one-time mini-lesson for beginner and intermediate skateboarders. Parent-signed registration form required. Ages 5 to 15. Parent/adult must be present entire time for ages 5-8. 6:30 to 7:45 p.m., Thursday, July 10 and July 31, $4. ADULT COED SOCCER - FALL LEAGUE Registration for the fall league opens July 15. The City offers spring and fall Adult Coed Soccer leagues. Open (18+) and over 35 divisions are available. For league information, please visit www.lakeoswegoparks.org. LEARN TO ROW DAY ON JULY 12 Plus other Lake Oswego Community Rowing Summer Programs Lake Oswego Community Rowing offers a wide variety of programs this summer from June 16 through August 8. There are programs for total beginning rowers through experienced, competitive Youth (high school), collegiate and Master (25 years and over) rowers. All of the events take place on the Willamette River from the Charlie S. Brown Water Sports Center near Roehr Park Amphitheater. The headline event is the 10th Annual Learn to Row Day on Saturday, July 12, with the first two-hour session starting at 7:30 a.m. and then running continuously until mid-afternoon. The event, the only one of its kind in the Portland area, is free and open to anyone 13 years of age or older. It is a fun and exciting time on the water doing something that most people have always wanted to try. For specific program information, including times and registration, visit www.lakeoswegorowing.com. Summer Reading Programs for all ages with weekly prizes. Sign up now! Call 503-636-7628. First Tuesday Music Series-Hungrytown Tuesday, July 1, 7pm Hungrytown is the musical and married duo of Rebecca Hall and Ken Anderson. They have released two highly- acclaimed CDs, both of which continue to receive much airplay on folk and Americana stations worldwide. Library presents Knights of Veritas Tuesday, July 1, 11am at Rossman Park The popular Knights of Veritas are back to entertain and educate with thrilling demonstrations of historical combat technique. Get ready for medieval fun! Performing Arts Series - Here Comes Everybody Wednesday, July 9, 1pm Here Comes Everybody will perform its brand of shiny orchestral pop music using the words of Shakespeare. This special program is for anyone who loves a little pop music mixed in with a good think. Special Music Program - Double Reed Divas Tuesday, July 15, 7pm Victoria Rac, Dagny Rask Regan and Ann van Bever, all of Double Reed Divas, will play a variety of music on Oboes, oboes d'amore, English horns and bassoon. Introduction to Urban Beekeeping Tuesday, July 22, 7pm Troy Bany, a veteran of the LO Fire Department and a Beekeeper, will present an introduction to urban beekeeping, tools and equipment, honey bee biology and local regulations to keeping honey bee colonies. PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN Baby Storytime Tuesdays and Wednesdays Special Series: Musical Laptime with Colette Fallon Fridays at 10:30am Families with babies from birth through 18 months are invited to musical laptimes. Special Shows for Children Every Wednesday at 3pm July 2 The Alphabeticians in Concert Enjoy funny and clever songs about such things as letters, numbers, dads, monsters, and extinct fish. The Alphabeticians includes two dads, Eric Levine and Jeff Inlay. July 9 “Papagayo” with Tears of Joy Puppet Theatre. Based on the book by Gerald McDermott, this Theatre, known for its innovation and excellence, brings the jungles of Central America to vibrant life. July 16 “The Great & Wonderful Flea Circus” with Oregon Fantasy Puppet Theatre. Celeste Rose presents a tale featuring an all bug circus and Fred the Flea Bag who must find his talent before he can join. July 23 Presto the Magician. Kevin Witt shares his love of children’s books while entertaining kids. His shows always include plenty of humor, interspersed with the “wow” effect of his magic tricks. July 30 “I Wonder Why” Tales with Pink Pig Puppet Theatre. This show is three stories in one. Puppeteer Steven Engelfried describes his shows as “low tech/ high humor,” with stories of mischief and trickery. Read to the Dogs (grades 1 and up) Tuesdays from 3 to 4pm Children can practice their reading skills by reading aloud to a four-footed, friendly listener. The dogs and handlers are part of the Portland Area Canine Therapy Team network. Please register ahead. GeerCrest Farm Discovery Exhibit Thursday, July 10, 10am to 2pm GeerCrest Farm is located on a family homestead east of Salem. These interactive exhibits are a fun way to learn about farming topics such as planting, harvesting, animal care, and food preservation. Lego Club for Grades 3-6 Monday, July 14, 4 to 5:30pm Kids work on projects and learn more about LEGOs. Materials provided but registration is required. Folktales Brought to Life: The Adventures of Hershel of Ostropol Thursday, July 24, 3pm For ages 5 and up, audiences are charmed by this original stage adaptation of a folktale written by Eric Kimmel starring Hershel, the lovable trickster. The story emphasizes the power of humor to overcome hardship. Scavenger Hunt through the end of August Flying prize awarded upon successful completion. Ask for more information at the Children’s Desk. PROGRAMS FOR TEENS Video Gaming Mondays from 1 to 3pm 6-12 graders are invited to play WII games at the Library. Players will test skills, eat eats, and have fun. Poetry Slam Thursday, July 17, 7 to 8pm The Library’s Teen Board presents an open mic opportunity for teens in grades 8-12 to share their passion for poetry. Teen poets are warmly invited to participate. Make a Bracelet or Anklet Saturday, July 19, 2 to 3pm Teens in grades 6-12 are invited to create unique bracelets or anklets. Materials are provided. Drawing Classes for Teens Thursdays, July 17 & July 24, 10am to noon Teens in grades 6-12 are invited to learn the fundamentals of drawing with Reference Librarian and artist Todd Feinman. Supplies provided. Sign up required, call 503-675-2540. LAKE OSWEGO SWIM PARK NOW OPEN The Lake Oswego Swim Park, located at 250 Ridgeway Road, is now open! Park amenities include water shooters, organized inner tube polo, park chairs and chaise lounges, picnic tables and covered areas. The park is open seven days a week, 1 to 6 p.m. from July 1 to August 31. Children under the age of ten must be accompanied by an individual 16 years or older. Entry is free and available to all residents of Lake Oswego. The Lake Grove Swim Park, located at 3800 Lakeview Blvd, is operated by the Lake Oswego School District (LOSD) and is open only to residents who live within the boundaries of the former Lake Grove School District. For more information, call 503-635-0355 or go to http://www.edline.net/pages/Lake_Oswego_ School_District/Community/lg_swim_park. 44 This newsletter is printed on 100% recycled content paper, using soy-based ink. Citizen Information Specialist and HelloLO Editor Bonnie Hirshberger 503-675-3992 bhirshberger@ci.oswego.or.us For inFormation about the City and its serviCes, go to www.Ci.oswego.or.us or Call 503-635-0257. Event dates are subject to change. More details are available online at: www.ci.oswego.or.us/calendar. For more information, call 503-675-3992. July 1 Tuesday • City Council Regular Meeting, 6:30pm • Knights of Veritas, Rossman Park, 11am • Library Read to Dogs, 3-4pm • Library Music Series, 7pm 2 Wednesday • Alphabeticians Concert, Library, 3pm • NRAB Meeting, 6:30pm • First Addition/Forest Hills Neighborhood Coordinating Meeting, 6:30pm • Evergreen NA Board Mtg, 7pm 3 Thursday • Millennium Concert Band, 7pm 4 Friday • City Holiday - CITY OFFICES CLOSED • Star Spangled Parade & Celebration, MPP, 10am • Lake Corp Fireworks Show 5 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm • Lake Corp Water Ski Show 6 Sunday • Moonlight & Music Concert, 6pm 7 Monday • DRC Meeting 8 Tuesday 9 Wednesday • Library Performing Arts Series, 1pm • TAB Meeting, 7pm • HRAB Meeting, 7pm • LAB Meeting, 7pm • Evergreen NA General Meeting, 7pm • Sounds of Summer Concert, 7-9pm 10 Thursday • Farm Discover Exhibit, Luscher, 10am- 2pm 11 Friday 12 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm • Walking Tour of Historic Downtown Buildings, 2-3:30pm • Backyard Habitat Open House, 3-5pm 13 Sunday • Walking Tour of Historic Iron Mtn Blvd, 2-3:30pm • Moonlight & Music Concert, 6pm 14 Monday • Planning Commission, 6:30pm 15 Tuesday • City Council Regular Meeting, 6:30pm • Stress Reduction Conversation, ACC, 6:30pm 16 Wednesday • PRAB Meeting, WEB, 6pm • Sounds of Summer Concert, 7-9pm 17 Thursday • Women’s Social Security Workshop, ACC, 6:30-8pm • Uplands NA Board Mtg, 7pm 18 Friday 19 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm • Benefit of Trees Walk, 1pm • Walking Tour of Historic Iron Mtn Blvd, 2-3:30pm 20 Sunday • Walking Tour of Historic Downtown Buildings, 2-3:30pm • Moonlight & Music Concert, 6pm 21 Monday • SAB Meeting, 6:30pm • DRC Meeting 22 Tuesday • Urban Beekeeping, Library, 7-8:30pm 23 Wednesday • Sounds of Summer Concert, 7-9pm 24 Thursday • Movies in the Park, MPP, dusk 25 Friday 26 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm 27 Sunday • Industrial Archaeology Walking Tour, 8:30-10:30am • Moonlight & Music Concert, 6pm 28 Monday • Planning Commission, 6:30pm 29 Tuesday 30 Wednesday • Sounds of Summer Concert, 7-9pm 31 Thursday • Movies in the Park, MPP, dusk August 1 Friday 2 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm Community Calendar ACC Adult Community Center DRC Development Review Commission HRAB Historic Resources Advisory Board LAB Library Advisory Board LORA Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency MPP Millennium Plaza Park NA Neighborhood Association NRAB Natural Resources Advisory Board PRAB Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SAB Sustainability Advisory Board TAB Transportation Advisory Board WEB West End BuildingGlossaryFIREWORKS WHERE TO VIEW Lake Oswego’s fireworks show, hosted by the Lake Corporation, will begin at dusk. The best viewing is near the Lake Grove Swim Park - fireworks cannot be seen from Millennium Plaza Park, Sundeleaf Plaza or George Rogers Park. Roads in the Lake Grove Swim Park area are restricted, but will have vehicular traffic. Therefore, for public safety, viewing of fireworks from the roadway will not be allowed. In addition, because of significant danger, no viewing is allowed from the railroad tracks. STAR SPANGLED PARADE Start the July 4th celebration with the Star Spangled Parade! The parade will begin at 10 a.m. from the staging area at Lake Garden Court, will continue on A Avenue, and end downtown at Millennium Plaza Park at approximately 11:45 a.m. This year, A Avenue from Chandler to downtown will be closed during the parade - in addition to closures in the area of Iron Mountain, Chandler, and Evergreen. The Star Spangled Celebration takes place from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Millennium Plaza Park. JULY 4TH ROAD RESTRICTIONS THIS YEAR - LOWER DRIVE WILL ONLY HAVE PARKING ON ONE SIDE The City hopes you enjoy Independence Day festivities. To make sure events run smoothly, road and parking restrictions will occur. The following parking restrictions will be in effect all day on July 4. All posted streets are “tow away” zones. Parking restrictions (No parking on one side): • Alder Circle • Allen Road • Canal Circle • Graef Circle • Maple Circle • Upper Drive • Greenbriar Road • Lower Drive The following roads will have restricted access from 7:30 p.m. to about midnight: • Cardinal Drive • Chapman Way • Kelok Road • Lamont Way • Lords Lane • AND all intersecting streets within the restricted zone Section of road restricted: • Bryant Road (from Lakeview to Jean) • Lakeview Blvd. (from Bryant to Iron Mtn.) • South Shore (from Westview Drive to Lakeview Blvd.) These roads, while restricted, will have vehicular traffic. ROX IN SOX TO ROCK LO ON AUGUST 2 - CELEBRATE MUSIC AND READING! Rox in Sox, the popular new festival of children’s music and reading, will host its second annual event in Lake Oswego, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, August 2. Come out for a day of fun on the front grassy lawn of the West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way! The City and the Lake Oswego Public Library were the first to come on board as Rox in Sox sponsors in its inaugural year. This year, the Library’s author tent will be a major attraction. Top children’s picture book authors, including Stephanie Bauer, Carmen Bernier- Grand, Connie Bowman, Philip Pelletier, and Nicole Rubel, will share their works with fans at the festival. So far, this year's musical guests include local artists The School of Rock, Red Yarn, Aaron Nigel Smith and his One World Chorus, Seattle’s The Not-Its!, Recess Monkey, plus Mista Cookie Jar and Secret Agent 23 Skidoo from California. For a current lineup of music, author readings and other festivities, go to www.roxinsox.org. Admission is free but families are asked to bring socks, shoes and books to distribute to kids in need in Portland, Kenya and Jamaica. Last year’s Rox in Sox attracted more than 1,800 people. In all, festival volunteers collected 1,003 pairs of socks, 69 pairs of shoes and 483 books. Photo: Aaron Nigel Smith and the One World Chorus performing last year. Photo by AYA World productions. RAILROAD PROPERTY AND THE LAW Frequently, Lake Oswego police officers encounter citizens walking, jogging or even camping along the railroad tracks and other railroad property in Lake Oswego. This is especially true during the annual Independence Day fireworks display near the Lake Grove Swim Park on July 4th. While the railroad tracks may present a decent vantage point from which you can view the fireworks, they also present an illegal, extremely dangerous and potentially deadly situation. It is considered trespassing to be on railroad property without the express permission from the railroad. This is a misdemeanor offense that could result in a maximum fine of $7,500 and/or up to a year in jail. You are only lawfully able to cross railroad property using marked crossings. More importantly, it is extremely dangerous to be on the railroad property. Did you know trains often take more than a mile to come to a complete stop? Please stay safe and stay off the tracks! Plan ahead, and find yourself a safe and legal vantage point to watch the fireworks. To learn more information about railroad safety, please visit the Operation Lifesaver website, http://www.oli.org.