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June 2013 Hello LOJune 2013the official newsletter of the city of lake oswegoHello 2 Boones Ferry Construction Second Street Be A Good Neighbor Thank you LOHS volunteers! Festival of the Arts Board & Commission Vacancies 3 Parks & Recreation Auditions City Library 4 Landscapes that Lower Your Energy Bill LO Amateur Radio Wildlife Among Us Community Calendar Insert Water Conservation Parks & Rec Living 50+ For inFormation about the City and its serviCes, go to www.Ci.oswego.or.us or Call 503-635-0257.Inside O . O L . *****ECRWSS***** POSTAL CUSTOMER Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID Permit 124 Lake Oswego, OR Vintage trolley - grand opening Step back in time with free trolley rideS, muSic and refreShmentS, July 4-6 Photo: Trolley 514 at Elk Rock Tunnel by Dave Rowe. Once known as “Oregon’s darkest tunnel,” the Elk Rock Tunnel was completed in 1921. Enjoy free rides on Lake Oswego’s new vintage trolley on July 4, 5 and 6. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day, step back in time while hearing about the Willamette Shore Line’s historic past and enjoying a relaxing ride on Vintage Trolley 514. Trolley 514, a replica of an original trolley used in Portland in 1904, was built in 1991 with modern safety features, wicker seats, solid brass fixtures and ornate solid oak woodwork. This scenic 20-minute ride will take passengers along the shore of the Willamette River through the 1,400- foot Elk Rock Tunnel and to the 686-foot Long Trestle. After a 2-year hiatus, the Willamette Shore Trolley resumes regular service on July 11 along this shortened southern portion of the 5.5-mile historic rail line. The Trolley is operated by volunteer members of the non- profit Oregon Electric Railway Historical Society. The original rail line opened for service on July 4, 1887. By 1920, at its peak, 64 scheduled trains ran between Portland and Lake Oswego. More recently, the Willamette Shore Trolley has been operating excursion passenger service since 1987. The full 5.5-mile line between Lake Oswego and Portland is expected to reopen once the Sellwood Bridge project is done and additional repairs to the Willamette Shore Line are complete. The Trolley Grand Opening Event will take place at the Trolley Depot, 311 N. State Street. Look for more information in the July HelloLO. community clean-up & e-waSte eVent recycle, donate or diSpoSe of your unwanted itemS on June 8 On June 8, from 9 a.m. to noon (or until dumpsters are full), bring your items to the Community Clean-Up Day at the West End Building. Electronic waste will be collected at River West Church. This is a self-service event; please be prepared to do your own lifting. intereSted in keeping chickenS? free urban chicken preSentation: June 19, city hall council chamberS Hens are a wonderful addition to the gardenscape besides providing the benefit of fresh eggs! On Wednesday, June 19, from 6 to 7 p.m., expert Michelle Koeppe will share the ins and outs of raising chickens. Come learn all the necessary steps to keep your flock healthy and happy - from diet to dwellings, finding suitable breeds for your set-up, and some nifty husbandry know- how. This workshop will feature live chickens including a sweet-natured Serama and Jersey Giant, and an intelligent and affable bantam Modern Game. Michelle Koeppe is a farmer and horticulturist, who is the owner/ operator of Phasian Farms, a heritage poultry and vegetable farm located on Chehalem Continued on page 4 getting good Value for what we pay mayor Studebaker talkS about SerViceS and utility rateS Utility rates for water, wastewater, transportation and stormwater will be on residents’ minds when recently-approved increases go into effect in July. The average household’s per month charge for these four important services is $121 now and will increase by $8 to $129. I do not like paying more for services any more than you do, but we do get value from these taken-for- granted services largely buried in the ground. The first principle of owning infrastructure assets is to keep them in good working order. As we are finding out with our roads, if we don’t invest in the community assets that we depend on every day, we will spend MORE to fix them when they fail completely. Just like maintaining your car or home, spending the right amount on the right things at the right time minimizes the cost of ownership long term. Unlike some communities, Lake Oswego has been, and continues to be, a good steward of your assets. So what do you get for your investment in the careful management of your services? water: $48 per month gets you 7,500 gallons of water, treated to safe drinking water standards and delivered to your home or business. That’s less than a penny per gallon (if you purchased bottled water, you’d get 48 gallons for the same price - and you’d have to go to the store to get it)! wastewater: $62.55 per month pays to collect, remove and treat your wastewater to environmental standards. For a family of four, that equals 42 trashcans full of wastewater per week--without having to haul it to the curb. Streets: $8 per month pays for street maintenance that helps ensure you have safe streets to drive on. Street maintenance was one item on the recent community survey that many of you wanted us to focus on. Fixing a street before it fails saves money in the long run. Surface water management: The typical home pays $11 per month. This fee goes toward projects that manage rainwater, control pollution from runoff and protect your property and our streets from flooding. For more information about the services on your utility bill that your city provides, go to www.ci.oswego.or.us/ finance/what-services-do-i-pay-and-get-when-paying- my-utility-bill. To help you better understand your utility rates, visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/finance/utility- bill-information. budget committee approVeS budget city council to adopt budget for fiScal year 2013-14 on June 4 On May 9, the Lake Oswego Budget Committee, which is made up of the seven City Councilors and seven appointed citizen members, approved a City Budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2013. The next step is for City Council to consider the Budget Committee’s recommendation, hold a public hearing, and adopt a City budget. This is scheduled to take place at the June 4 City Council meeting. Over a series of three meetings, the Budget Committee made a number of changes to the City Continued on page 2 Continued on page 4 2 Mike Kehoe City Councilor 503-706-8365 (Cell) Kent Studebaker Mayor 503-201-2270 (Cell) Jeff Gudman City Councilor 503-780-1524 (Cell) Donna Jordan City Councilor 503-675-1120 (Home) Skip O’Neill City Councilor 503-781-7664 (Cell) Jon Gustafson City Councilor 503-348-5191 (Cell) Karen Bowerman City Councilor 503-858-5983 (Cell) City Council 503-635-0215 503-697-6594 (fax) City Council e-mail: council@ci.oswego.or.us City Manager Tom Coffee 503-635-0215 board & commiSSion VacancieS Do you have a passion for parks? A love of libraries? Are you a high school student who is looking to serve the community, and learn from your fellow citizens, while improving the quality of life in your home town? Maybe even round out your resume as you prepare for college? Please consider applying for a position on an advisory board! Apply online at www.ci.oswego.or.us/boc/boards- commissions-vacancies. be a good neighbor trim Vegetation along your property Is the vegetation along your property a hazard? It may be if it restricts visibility at an intersection, obstructs the view of a sign, blocks a street light, impedes traffic or pedestrians, or hinders maintenance work. Lake Oswego City Code requires property owners to keep sidewalks, streets and the public right-of- way adjoining their property free from rocks, yard clippings or other debris, and from projecting or overhanging bushes, brush and limbs that may make the passage of vehicles or pedestrians unsafe. Branches, leaves and other vegetative growth shall not be allowed to project an elevation of less than 9 feet above the level of the sidewalk and 13.5 feet over a street. If your property is at an intersection, the corner must be kept clear of vegetation over the height of 30 inches and under 8 feet for the visibility of vehicles and pedestrians. For more information, call Engineering Technician Nancy Flye at 503-697-7419. conStruction Set for auguSt lower booneS ferry railroad croSSing (chow corner regional Sidewalk) Beginning in August, the City, in cooperation with Portland & Western Railroad, will reconstruct the rail crossing on Boones Ferry Road between Jean Way and 63rd Avenue. The work will include new rails and crossing panels, asphalt roadway approaches, sidewalks on both sides of the road and new stormwater drainage. It is anticipated that the project will take approximately six weeks to complete. Boones Ferry Road is expected to be fully closed at this location from August 14 to 20 (these dates may fluctuate depending on field conditions). The City will be working with businesses and residents in the area to help reduce the impact from the project. Updates and detour routes will be posted to the City’s project webpage: https://www.ci.oswego.or.us/ publicworks/lower-boones-ferry-road-rail-crossing- chow-corner-regional-sidewalk. For additional information during construction, call the Construction Hotline at 503-635-0261. welcome back to Second Street check out what’S new! The dust has settled, the barricades are gone and Second Street looks great! We invite you to explore the new improvements, including better access to all of the wonderful shops, plenty of parking, lighting and of course trees and assorted plants to complete the experience…and that is only what happened on the surface! More improvements happened underground that would extend the life of the road and improve water quality. While Second Street opened 3 ½ weeks in advance of the initial targeted date of June 15, a few final details still need to be completed including installation of railings around the new stormwater planters. In addition, in July, two art pieces will be installed in preparation for an unveiling in August. This project was funded by the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency as part of continuing efforts to improve the downtown. Thank you for your support and patience during this project. Local businesses look forward to seeing you soon! thank you lohS VolunteerS! On April 5, the Lake Oswego track team spread 20 cubic yards of gravel on trails in Springbrook Park. Led by Coach Eric Lider, about 40 team members took only an hour to move all the gravel, improving about 400 yards of trail. The team then removed English Ivy from about 100 trees, saving the trees and slowing the spread of ivy in the park. This is the third year in which Lake Oswego High School track and cross-country teams have partnered with the City and Friends of Springbrook Park to improve trails in the park. Both teams use the park for training or cross-country races. On April 19, for Lake Oswego High School’s 7th annual Community Work Day, over 50 LOHS students showed up at the Lake Oswego Public Library, worked hard and did an excellent job cleaning the Library. The Community Work Day project at the Library was part of a student-initiated project designed to thank the community of Lake Oswego. The City would like to thank all the volunteers from Lake Oswego High School. We appreciate your hard work! Manager’s Proposed Budget, including service reductions that were presented as “budget decision packages.” The packages that were approved include the reduction of services and layoffs in Long Range Planning (3 FTEs), Parks & Recreation (2 FTEs), Public Affairs (1 FTE), and Economic Development (1 FTE). In addition, the Budget Committee agreed to maintain the City’s property tax rate at the current 2012-13 rate, increase neighborhood enhancement grant funding by $15,000, implement an alternative program to the Sensitive Lands regulations for $80,000, and initiate a right-of-way tree and vegetation maintenance program for a cost of $50,000. The savings from the reductions in non-core services helped address the General Fund’s operating deficit (caused primarily by rising personnel costs) and allowed the Budget Committee to allocate an additional $784,000 to street maintenance, a high priority core service. To review the Budget, the City Manager’s Budget Message, and the list of Budget Committee’s changes, visit www. ci.oswego.or.us/finance/city-budget. budget Continued from page 1 feStiVal of the artS Volunteer at thiS wonderful community eVent! The 50th annual Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts, held June 21-23 at the Lakewood Center for the Arts and George Rogers Park, would greatly appreciate your help. There are a number of places to volunteer: hospitality, booth sitters, docents, and information booth helpers, to name a few. For more information on the various volunteer roles and to sign up, visit https://sites.google.com/site/loartsfestival/ or call Anne Nudelman at the Lakewood Center at 503-635-3901. This year’s festival is entitled, “Spoons: Culinary Inspired Art” featuring a unique exhibition of art all sharing a culinary inspiration. The festival highlights include live musical entertainment, family activities, food booths, demonstrations and additional juried and open shows of arts and fine crafts exhibits. Don’t miss Kids Day, Friday, June 21, at George Rogers Park, plus the Missoula Children’s Theatre featuring The Hare versus the Tortoise on June 21 at 4 p.m. and June 22 at 10:30 a.m. for more information call: main number, 503-636-7628 reference desk number, 503-675-2540 or visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/library 3 y o u r C o m m u n i t y r e s o u r C e F o r i n F o r m a t i o n a n d e n r i C h m e n tcity library d i s C o v e r a C t i v e l i v i n gparkS & recreation west end building, 4101 kruse way for more information, call 503-675-2549 or visit www.lakeoswegoparks.org all comerS track meet Due to construction at the Lake Oswego High School, the All Comers Track Meet scheduled for July 10, 17, and 24 has been cancelled. The good news is this event will be back in 2014 and the Parks & Recreation Department has a variety of activities and events scheduled this summer to keep you busy. Don’t forget to sign up for Summer Camps and Recreational Activities offered this summer! Take a look at some of the upcoming classes. July 4th Star Spangled parade & celebration It’s time to celebrate our many freedoms! So don your patriotic colors, decorate your wagons, and enjoy an old fashioned 4th of July celebration! Join the fun or watch your friends stroll down A Avenue. The parade features an authentic Fife and Drum Band, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, classic cars and more. A huge thank you to Lakeside Bicycles, sponsor of the bike corral for the Star Spangled Parade. When guests arrive at Millennium Plaza Park, they will be welcomed with live music from The Menace Band, face-painting, balloon animals and a pie-eating contest! The Parade Staging begins at 9 a.m. at Lake Garden Court (off Iron Mtn. Blvd.). All vehicles and large groups MUST pre-register with the Parks & Recreation Department to participate in the parade. Please call Debbi at 503-697-6590, to register. millennium concert band Launch your holiday weekend by listening to a USO- style performance from Millennium Concert Band on Wednesday, July 3, located at Millennium Plaza Park at 7 p.m. Under the direction of Dale Cleland, you are entertained with a myriad of patriotic, military and marching compositions. Veterans are honored during this exceptional evening performance, which features a ceremonial Presentation of Colors from the Lake Oswego Police Honor Guard. Summer country dance Join instructor Holli Wronski and the Youth Action Council for a good, old fashioned Country Dance at the West End Building. Let loose and dance away the evening. Start with a lesson of party favorites from line dancing and partner pattern dances to two step and West Coast swing. There will be plenty of variety offered to everyone. Novice to experienced dancers are all welcome. Ages 14 and older, Friday, June 7, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., $5. Summer campS Junkyard Shenanigans Man's trash is our treasure! Explore the art of extreme junk upcycling with activities like junk sculptures and bottle cap wind chimes. Spend Friday exploring OMSI with your friends. Ages 7 to 12, Monday through Friday, July 1 to July 5, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. $46 (no camp July 4). nature on the farm mini-camp At Luscher Farm, children discover ways to explore nature through play and mindful activities. Each morning begins with yoga and singing, followed by nature-based activities, healthy garden snacks, and traditional games played in the field. Ages 5 to 8, Tuesday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. $74. Visit www.lakeoswegoparks.org for Camp dates. in my backyard camp Hidden treasures, worm habitats, summer solstice celebration, animal tracking, mysteries of nature, and observations and recording nature and art, these are just some of the cool subjects and activities offered at Luscher Farm. Youth learn outdoor skills and enjoy the Children's Garden. Ages 5 to 12, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. $155. Visit www. lakeoswegoparks.org for Camp dates. Swim park The Lake Oswego Swim Park, located at 250 Ridgeway Road, opens July 1. Enjoy the sun and park amenities including water shooters, inner tubes, park chairs and chaise lounges. The park is open 7 days a week from 12 to 6 p.m. until August 30. Certified lifeguards will be on duty at all times during open hours, but children under the age of 10 must be accompanied by an individual 16 years or older. Swim Park entry is free and available to residents of Lake Oswego. programS for adultS first tuesday music Series - dan balmer Tuesday, June 4, 7 p.m. Enjoy outstanding guitar handling by Balmer as he performs a wide range of guitar pieces from jazz to country, to rock and blues. lazinfest Library card holders 18 and older may register at the Library beginning June 1 through August 31. Weekly prizes with a grand prize drawing in September. Second wednesday performing arts Series – thousand waves Wednesday, June 12, 1 p.m. Thousand Waves is a unique chamber group that celebrates the music of the East and the West, blending the sounds of the Japanese koto, the 8-string Spanish classical guitar, the violin, and the transverse flute. oregon history museum’s exhibit on display “Oregon’s Landmark Legislation” This exhibit highlights groundbreaking legislation that Oregon has passed since Statehood either by Politician, Legislative Action, or Public Initiative. presentation: “are backyard chickens right for you?” Saturday, June 15, 11 a.m. Sara Tetreault will present tips and answer your questions on this popular topic. poetry reading in honor of william Stafford Tuesday, June 18, 7 p.m. The Friends of William Stafford and the Library present an evening of poetry honoring William Stafford, featuring poets Carolyne Wright, Penelope Scambly Schott, and Tim Barnes. memoir writing workshop with author flora wong Wednesday, June 5, 10 a.m., Adult Community Center This event is presented in partnership with the Center and the Library. Flora Wong‘s book, Long Way Home, covers a span of eight decades of turmoil, change and personal growth. programS for children children’s Storytimes Summer Series Begins Tuesday, June 18 Baby Storytime (birth - 18 months) Tuesdays at 11:45 a.m.; Toddler Storytime (19 months - 3 years old) Wednesdays at 11:45 a.m.; Preschool Storytime (3 - 5 year olds) Tuesdays & Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. children’s Summer reading club – dig into reading! Children from preschool through sixth grade are invited to join the Library’s summer reading club. Participants may sign up June 1 through July. Special Series: musical laptime with colette fallon Fridays at 10:30 a.m. starting June 21 Families with babies from birth through 18 months are invited to musical laptimes presented by early childhood music specialist Colette Fallon. aaron nigel Smith and band in concert Wednesday, June 19, 3 p.m. “My simple mission is to share my love for music and movement with the world,” states Aaron Nigel Smith. A cast member of the PBS Kids show, Between the Lions, Smith’s concerts inspire kids to get up and dance. mad Science: what do you know about h2o Thursday, June 20, 11 a.m. For grades K-5, this interactive science assembly highlights the limited availability of fresh drinking water on the planet and the importance of using it wisely. green hats and dragon eggs with oregon fantasy puppet theatre Wednesday, June 26, 3 p.m. Puppeteer Celeste Rose presents a tale starring King Topper and Sir Sneeze-a-lot, who leave Princess Sheila at home while they go on a dragon quest. Scavenger hunt Through the end of August Youth of all ages are invited to enjoy the challenge of a Library summer scavenger hunt. Prize awarded upon successful completion. programS for teenS Read, Raffle and Win in Teen Summer Reading! June 1 through August 31 Teens entering grades 7-12 can win prizes for reading in Lake Oswego Library’s Teen Summer Reading program, learn more at www.lakeoswegolibrary.org/teen. teen writers group Monday, June 24, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Teens ages 13-18 are invited to write, share, and learn in the Library's Teen Writers Group facilitated by Tiah Lindner, a writer, editor, teacher, and practicing poet. the common application: how to maximize your impact Thursday, June 27, 3 to 4 p.m. This workshop examines the College Common Application. Presenter Tim Cantrick is an independent college counselor. Registration required. madden for pS3 in the library Monday, June 24, 3 to 5 p.m. Gamers in grades 6-12 are invited to test their skills playing Madden 2013. Tournament play is a possibility. Register at lochild@ci.oswego.or.us. Spanish language conversation group for teens Thursday, June 27, 6 to 7 p.m. High school students in second-year Spanish and above can practice Spanish language skills in this group facilitated by Juan Maria Iglesias, an adjunct Spanish language instructor at PSU. Registration required. auditionS for the hare VerSuS the tortoiSe The Missoula Children's Theatre (MCT), the nation’s largest touring children’s theatre, arrives in Lake Oswego with a set, lights, costumes, props and make-up, everything it takes to put on a play...except the cast. Auditions will be held at the West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way, on June 17, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. 50- 60 local students will be cast to perform at the Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts on Friday, June 21, 4 p.m., and Saturday, June 22, 10:30 a.m. Children ages 6-18 are encouraged to try out. Information and details regarding rehearsal times follow auditions. There is a $50 fee due from youth selected for the theatre program. For more information, call Parks & Recreation at 503-675-2549. 44 This newsletter is printed on 100% recycled content paper, using soy-based ink. Citizen Information Specialist and HelloLO Editor Bonnie Hirshberger 503-675-3992 bhirshberger@ci.oswego.or.us For inFormation about the City and its serviCes, go to www.Ci.oswego.or.us or Call 503-635-0257. Event dates are subject to change. More details are available online at: www.ci.oswego.or.us/calendar. For more information, call 503-675-3992. June 1 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm 2 Sunday 3 Monday • DRC Meeting, 7pm 4 Tuesday • City Council Regular Meeting, 7pm • Library Music Series, 7pm 5 Wednesday • First Addition/Forest Hills Neighborhood Coordinating Meeting, 7pm 6 Thursday 7 Friday • Blood Drive, City Hall, 9:30am-3pm 8 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm • Community Clean Up & E-Waste Recycling Event • Landscaping Workshop, WEB, 10- 11:30am 9 Sunday 10 Monday • LO Tigard Water Partnership Over- sight Committee Mtg, 5:30pm 11 Tuesday 12 Wednesday • Library Performing Arts Series, 1pm • NRAB Meeting, 6:30pm • HRAB Meeting, 7pm • LAB Meeting, 7pm 13 Thursday 14 Friday 15 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm 16 Sunday 17 Monday • Missoula Children’s Theatre Auditions, WEB, 10am • SAB Meeting, 6:30pm • DRC Meeting, 7pm 18 Tuesday • City Council Regular Meeting, 7pm • An Evening of Poetry, Library, 7pm 19 Wednesday • Public Art Committee Mtg, 9:30am • Urban Chicken Presentation, City Hall, 6-7pm • PRAB Meeting, 6:30pm 20 Thursday • Comp Plan CAC Mtg, 4-6pm • Uplands Neighborhood Association Board Mtg, 7pm 21 Friday • LO Festival of the Arts • Kid’s Day at LO Festival of the Arts • Missoula Children’s Theatre, GRP, 4pm 22 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm • LO Festival of the Arts • Missoula Children’s Theatre, GRP, 10:30am • Amateur Radio Demos, noon 23 Sunday • LO Festival of the Arts 24 Monday • Planning Commission, 6:30pm 25 Tuesday 26 Wednesday 27 Thursday 28 Friday 29 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm 30 Sunday July 1 Monday • DRC Meeting, 7pm 2 Tuesday • City Council Regular Meeting, 7pm 3 Wednesday • First Addition/Forest Hills Neighborhood Coordinating Meeting, 7pm • Millennium Concert Band, MPP, 7pm 4 Thursday • City Holiday - CITY OFFICES CLOSED • Star Spangled Parade, 10am • Star Spangled Celebration 5 Friday Community Calendar ACC Adult Community Center DRC Development Review Commission HRAB Historic Resources Advisory Board LAB Library Advisory Board LONAC Lake Oswego Neighborhood Action Coalition LORA Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency MPP Millennium Plaza Park NA Neighborhood Association NRAB Natural Resources Advisory Board PRAB Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SAB Sustainability Advisory Board TAB Transportation Advisory Board TAC Transportation Advisory Council WEB West End BuildingGlossarywildlife among uS Lake Oswego has habitat that supports wildlife - coyotes, raccoons, deer, eagles, and more. Many of us may be lucky enough to experience the excitement of seeing a coyote or other urban wildlife. React, but don’t over react. Aggressiveness towards humans is not normal coyote behavior and is extremely rare. Do not feed wildlife - this reduces fear to humans and can increase the possibility of an aggressive encounter. Be big, mean and loud to scare off curious wildlife and never approach any wild animals. For additional information on hazing techniques and other useful information about urban coyotes and other wildlife, please visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/planning/coyotes-and-other-urban-wildlife or call the Citizen Information Center at 503-635-0257. If you feel threatened by any animal, wild or domestic, you should immediately report this to the Lake Oswego Police Department by calling 911. landScapeS that lower your energy bill part of the urban & community foreStry 2013 workShop SerieS Your garden and yard can be used to reduce your energy bills! On Saturday, June 8, from 10 to 11:30 a.m., explore various vegetated and non-vegetated strategies to reduce energy demand inside your home with Maria Cahill, owner of Green Girl Land Development Solutions. This workshop is free and open to the public with pre- registration. Please call 503-635-0290, to register. Workshop will be held at the West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way. For more information, email nature@ci.oswego.or.us. lo amateur radio From noon, Saturday, June 22, to noon, Sunday, June 23, Lake Oswego Amateur Radio operators will join with thousands of their peers across the country to demonstrate their emergency communications capabilities. Stop by Marylhurst Heights Park in West Linn (1800 Valley View Drive) to see radio equipment in operation, and to learn how the Lake Oswego Amateur Radio Emergency Services group (LOARES) assists the community during emergencies and how they help at public events such as the Lake Run. urban chicken workShop Continued from page 1 Mountain. With a background working as a zookeeper, park ranger, and veterinary assistant, she brings a unique perspective to farming, maintaining a balance with nature and focusing on holistic methods. Though Michelle maintained a chicken flock while living in New Zealand a decade ago, her true chicken zeal started when she worked with Pistils Nursery in Portland - the first business to sell chickens within the city limits. She has raised over 95 breeds of poultry. Now active with the Pacific Northwest Poultry Association, she is working on her certification to become an American Poultry Association poultry judge. Michelle Koeppe: At Phasian Farms, I raise/ breed heritage poultry breeds for the backyard enthusiast. These are birds raised to produce eggs, as well as for enhancement to the landscape and garden - often kept as pets. My focus is heritage and truly rare breeds, as well as a few more common ones, that I find companionable. All birds are raised with time on pasture, organic feed, tonic herbs, and lots of human interaction. For more information about this free workshop, please call Beth Otto, Sustainability Intern, at 503- 635-0286. For more information, including specific material restrictions, visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/sustainability or call the Citizen Information Center at 503-635-0257. west end building, 4101 kruse way We will collect the following items for reuse, recycling, or disposal: • Useable household items such as linens, chairs, dishes, microwaves, and clean mattresses. • Bikes in good condition. • Scrap metal and non-Freon appliances. • Items you can recycle curbside. • Non-recyclable bulky items for disposal, such as non-reusable furniture, carpeting, and large plastic items. river west church, 2000 country club • Electronics Recycling: Computers, monitors, televisions, associated peripherals, and other electronics. restrictions: For information on how to dispose of these items, contact Metro at 503-234-3000 or Republic Services (formerly Allied Waste) at 503-636-3011. • NO yard debris. • NO hazardous material such as oil, gasoline, fertilizers, fireworks or ammunition, fluorescent light bulbs, batteries, paint, thermometers, sharps or medical waste. • NO Freon-based appliances such as refrigerators or air conditioners. [Energy Trust offers free refrigerator and freezer recycling, call 866-444- 8907, for details.] • NO stumps, tires, oversized branches, rocks, ashes, asbestos, animal waste, radioactive material or construction and demolition debris. • NO Styrofoam or packing peanuts. community clean-up Continued from page 1