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November 2013 PreparednessPreParedness GuideHelping you prepare for the unexpected November 2013 emerGency information: 503-635-0257 www.ci.oswego.or.us/citymanager/emergency-information Library Presents author aLan corson Disaster Can Strike at Any Moment. Are You Prepared? The Lake Oswego Public Library presents a fascinating evening with Alan Corson, author of The Family Guide to Survival: Skills that Can Save Your Life and the Lives of Your Family - Tuesday, November 19, 7 p.m. Why should you attend this presentation? Take it from the back cover of Corson's book: "Think about where you are right now. How well would you and your family fare if today, right now, you were suddenly faced with an enormous disaster - a massive earthquake, a sudden flood, a horrific hurricane, tornado, super storm, or other catastrophic event?" In an interactive presentation and demonstration with plenty of time for questions, Corson will discuss shelter, fire, safe drinking water, and the myths and facts of emergency survival. He will bring a “Bug Out Bag” to show what the critical items every person and every household should have on hand in the event of an emergency. He will also discuss what a person needs to carry in their car whenever they leave home (always). You'll leave with everyday emergency-preparedness measures you can take today for the safety and survival of yourself and your family. Corson served as a drill sergeant in the US military instructing new soldiers in basic combat training. After earning a master’s degree in judicial administration from Sangamon State University in Illinois, he spent 25 years with the Oregon State Police. As an OSP detective, Corson was responsible for successfully investigating several high-profile homicides. He served on the Oregon State Police SWAT Team as the team sniper for eight years. He currently lives with his wife in Tualatin. The presentation is free and open to all. The Lake Oswego Library is located at 706 4th Street. For more information about this event, or other Third Tuesday author programs sponsored by the Library, please contact Alicia Yokoyama, 503-534-4228. heLP us heLP you While the ability to respond to emergencies is the City’s highest priority, inclement weather situations can delay fire, police and emergency medical services as well as increased demand. A few things that you can do to help us help you include: • Ensuring that your address is clearly visible and not covered with snow or ice • Clearing a path from your street to your front door • Having an emergency supply kit • Using flashlights instead of candles to help prevent fires • Being aware of carbon monoxide hazards from some outdoor heating devices used indoors • Be prepared - during some emergencies, it can take more time for help to reach you is your house number VisibLe? In an Emergency, Seconds Count To help first responders identify your house quickly, it is important that house numbers be clearly visible from the street. Take a few minutes and make sure your home can be easily found in case of an emergency. House numbers should be: • In plain, block numerals on a contrasting background. • At least 4 inches high. • Unobstructed and large enough to be seen from the road. • Facing the street named in your address. • Displayed at your driveway entrance if your house is not visible from the road. ‘WinGinG it’ is not an emerGency PLan According to a National Climatic Data Center report, 2011 saw more billion-dollar natural disasters than any year on record. That year alone, the U.S. experienced its first hurricane landfall since 2008, the most deadly series of tornadoes since the 1950s, significant earthquakes and severe flooding - hazards that impacted every region of the country. All of these events have served as important reminders that disasters can strike anytime, anywhere, and being prepared is one of the most effective things we can do to protect our homes, businesses and loved ones. Visit Ready.gov for a wealth of information on how to prepare for and respond to emergencies: Be Informed - Learn about the potential emergencies that can happen where you live and ways to respond to them. Make a Plan - Your family may not be together when a disaster strikes: how you will get to a safe place; how you will contact one another; how you will get back together; and what you will do in different situations. Ready.gov has made it easy for you to make a family emergency plan, simply download the Family Communication Plan for Parents and Kids (http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/34330) and fill out the sections before printing it or emailing it to your family and friends. Build a Kit - You may need to survive on your own after an emergency. This means having your own food, water and other supplies. Local officials will be on the scene after a disaster but they cannot reach everyone immediately. You could get help in hours or it might take days. The Oregon Resilience Plan, released in February 2013, recommends individuals be prepared for a minimum of two weeks (an increase from the old standard of 72 hours). What WiLL the city do? The City of Lake Oswego will provide service at the highest levels possible during extreme winter weather events by: • Plowing main roads and the downtown transit core with all available equipment • Ensuring emergency calls are responded to • Responding to citizens in a timely manner • Keeping sidewalks and parking lots at open City buildings clear of snow and ice • Effectively communicating closures or changes in services • Posting closure information clearly on City buildings • Communicating regular updates by using the City website (www.ci.oswego.or.us) and facebook page, Twitter, email distribution, list serves, and local media such as the Lake Oswego Review and The Oregonian • Identifying a warming center if needed Safety for the public and staff is important to all of us, and we will be doing our part to provide the best service possible in any extreme condition. Project aLert & codered The Adult Community Center (ACC), in partnership with the Police and Fire Departments, has developed a program for older adults living in Lake Oswego. Project Alert provides a daily call to participants during times of emergencies and provides assistance as needed. When the program is activated, ACC volunteers make daily calls to each registered participant. Special needs and concerns are relayed to ACC staff for follow-up. This program operates only during times of emergencies, such as prolonged heat, severe winter storms, and power outages. For more information or to register, visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/acc or call 503-635-3758. Project Alert is in addition to CodeRED, the City’s emergency notification system which distributes emergency messages via telephone, text or email to registered participants in the community at a rate of 1,000 calls per minute. To be added to this emergency call list, register online at www. ci.oswego.or.us/citymanager/code-red-emergency-notification, or call the Citizen Information Center at 503-635-0257. Registration is confidential, free, and easy. PLoWinG routes The City will use all available equipment to clear main roads for emergency responders, vehicles, and pedestrian safety. Once main roads are addressed, Operations crews will focus on other streets, if possible. For questions or concerns, call Lake Oswego Public Works - Operations at 503-635-0280. emerGency information: 503-635-0257 www.ci.oswego.or.us/citymanager/emergency-information 2014 emerGency PreParedness caLendars Get your free calendar today! This free calendar focuses on topics that help you prepare for the unexpected: • How to prepare for severe weather and other emergencies • What to do during a flood or landslide • Earthquake and tsunami preparedness • What to do with animals during an evacuation • Fire prevention • Medical emergenies and poisonings This calendar also includes a comprehensive list of public safety organizations you may need and an emergency contact section where you can keep track of all your emergency contacts. To order your free calendar online or to preview the calendar, visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/EmergencyManagement. You can also contact Bonnie Hirshberger at bhirshberger@ci.oswego.or.us or 503-675-3992 for a copy. PrePare to minimize your stress Often it is the simplest of things that prevent a minor problem from turning into a huge frustration or a crisis. In addition to a good supply of food (for humans and pets), water, good flashlights and plenty of batteries, having the following items easily accessible can help you weather the storm: • A shovel to keep your home accessible when there is snow, ice or piles from plowing on sidewalks, walkways and driveways • Traction aids for your car and feet - sand, gravel, or kitty litter as well as good snow/warm shoes or traction devices to clip on your shoes • Chains, snow tires or a 4-wheel/all-wheel drive car that has plenty of gas; or a plan to use TriMet • An alternative heat source or dry wood for the fireplace (with a clean fireplace and chimney) • Prescription medications and necessary over-the- counter items • Internet access to work, school/work projects and key contacts City of Lake Oswego - Citizen Information Center 503-635-0257, www.ci.oswego.or.us City facility closure information Lake Oswego Public Works Operations 503-635-0280 City Operations information including plowing plan, broken City water pipes, downed trees, storm drain blockage and sewer overflows Republic Services of Lake Oswego 503-636-3011, www.lakeoswego.disposal.com Garbage and recycling information PGE - 503-228-6322 Electrical outages or downed power lines NW Natural Gas - 503-226-4211 Line locates or if you smell gas Police - 503-635-0238 (Non-Emergency)911 in case of emergency Fire - 503-635-0275 (Non-Emergency)911 in case of emergency TriMet - 503-238-7433 press “2”Bus routes, schedules and snow delay information Lake Oswego School District 503-534-2000, www.loswego.k12.or.us School closure information numbers you need to KnoW recycLinG and GarbaGe To help ensure the safety of the public and its employees, if extreme weather conditions occur, Republic Services may delay garbage and recycling collection services. Services will continue the following day if conditions improve. If conditions do not improve and your collection is missed, please store material on your property until your next regularly-scheduled collection day. A double amount will be collected at no additional charge. For questions regarding service, visit Republic Services at www. lakeoswego.disposal.com or call 503-636-3011. traVeLinG this Winter? Oregon’s beautiful scenery is a year-round source of enjoyment. Driving in Oregon’s winters, however, can be challenging. Arrive safely at your destination by following recommendations: • Before you go, visit www.TripCheck.com or call 5-1-1 for the latest in road conditions, weather forecast, chain requirements, and incident information. • Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route. Check in when you’ve reached your destination. • Don’t use cruise control in wet, icy or snowy weather. • Keep your car’s gas tank full for emergency use and to keep the fuel line from freezing. • Put together a separate disaster supplies kit for the trunk of each car used by members of your household. If you should become stranded during a winter storm, these items will make you more comfortable until the storm passes. Gas LeaK After an earthquake, if you detect a strong natural gas odor or hear gas blowing, your home or business may have a leak. If you smell rotten eggs, leave the area and call NW Natural at 800-882-3377. Here are some other steps to take if a natural gas leak is detected: • Do not use your telephone. This includes cellular phones and all types of portable communication and electronic devices that have a battery. These can spark and create a source of ignition. • Do not light matches or create any other source of ignition. • Do not operate ANY electrical switch, including lights, on or off. This could create a spark. • Evacuate everyone from the area. Gas shutoff How to manually turn off your home’s main natural gas line. If you need to have your gas service turned off, call NW Natural and a technician will provide the service for you. However, should a situation arise where you need to turn off your gas supply immediately, follow this simple procedure: • Locate the shutoff valve on the riser pipe from the ground to your meter (Figure A) or on newer meters the service line going from your meter into the house (Figure B). • Use an adjustable pipe or crescent-type wrench to turn the valve a quarter turn in either direction. When the valve head is parallel to the pipe, it is in the OPEN position. • Turn the valve head crosswise (perpendicular) to the pipe and it will be in the OFF position. • There are also natural gas shutoff valves on the lines fueling individual pieces of equipment. Once the gas is off, leave it off. Call your NW Natural office when you are ready for the gas to be restarted. A qualified service technician will check your system, turn on your service and relight your appliances for you. insuLate your PiPes While winter doesn’t officially start until December 21, Lake Oswego has already experienced some cold nights. As temperatures dip below freezing, exposed or shallow buried pipes may be at risk of freezing and bursting, resulting in problems when warmer temperatures return. Property owners are responsible for maintaining plumbing from their meter to the fixtures throughout their house. To help prevent frozen and bursting pipes, take a few preventative measures before the freezing temperatures arrive: • Drain your irrigation system or have it “blown out” using an air compressor. • Insulate valves/backflow equipment. • Cover hose bibs with Styrofoam covers and wrap free- standing garden spigots in weatherproof insulation or pipe insulation to at least 8” below ground. • Keep minimal heat on in a vacant house. Or if you are leaving the house for an extended period of time, set your thermostat to between 50 and 60 degrees to maintain sufficient indoor temperature to protect appliances and indoor pipes in the kitchen, bathrooms, laundry room, or any other room with water or drain lines. • Wrap water heaters that are in unheated parts of the house to prevent freezing and to save energy. • Close foundation vents to keep cold air from getting under the house and damaging exposed pipes. • Drain water features/ponds to avoid damage to liners and materials. If your water feature is used in the winter, make sure the water is continually flowing to prevent freezing. • During the worst freezing weather, let a thin stream of water run from the faucets located farthest from the street and open cabinet doors under the sinks. Make sure you know where the main shut-off valve for your plumbing is located and how to turn it off. If you need help locating your water shut-off valve or turning off your water at the meter, call Lake Oswego Public Works - Operations at 503-635-0280.