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November 2014 PreparednessGuideHelping you prepare for the unexpected November 2014 emerGency information: 503-635-0257 www.ci.oswego.or.us/citymanager/emergency-information PreParedness HelP us HelP you While the ability to respond to emergencies is the City’s highest priority, inclement weather situations can delay fire, police and emergency medical services as well as increase demand. A few things that you can do to help us help you include: • Ensuring that your address is clearly visible and not covered with snow or ice • Clearing a path from your street to your front door • Having an emergency supply kit • Using flashlights instead of candles to help prevent fires • Being aware of carbon monoxide hazards from some outdoor heating devices used indoors • Be prepared - during some emergencies, it can take more time for help to reach you is your House number Visible? In an Emergency, Seconds Count To help first responders identify your house quickly, it is important that house numbers be clearly visible from the street. Take a few minutes and make sure your home can be easily found in case of an emergency. House numbers should be: • In plain, block numerals on a contrasting background. • At least six inches high. • Unobstructed and large enough to be seen from the road. • Facing the street named in your address. • On the door, the door frame, the main entrance or displayed at your driveway entrance if your house is not visible from the road. HaVe an emerGency Plan? Who are you relying on? From quick-striking monster typhoons to slow-onset drought, natural disasters impact the lives of millions of people around the world. In 2014, the United States experienced several major natural disasters including tornados in the mid-west and southeast, a massive mudflow in Washington, and a cold wave that affected the eastern U.S. All of these events have served as important reminders that disasters can strike anytime, anywhere, and being prepared is one of the most effective things we can do to protect our homes, businesses and loved ones. Visit Ready.gov for a wealth of information on how to prepare for and respond to emergencies: Be Informed - Learn about the potential emergencies that can happen where you live and ways to respond to them. Make a Plan - Your family may not be together when a disaster strikes: how you will get to a safe place; how you will contact one another; how you will get back together; and what you will do in different situations. Ready.gov has made it easy for you to make a family emergency plan, simply download the Family Communication Plan for Parents and Kids (http://www.fema.gov/media- library/assets/documents/34330) and fill out the sections before printing it or emailing it to your family and friends. Build a Kit - You may need to survive on your own after an emergency. This means having your own food, water and other supplies. Local officials will be on the scene after a disaster but they cannot reach everyone immediately. You could get help in hours or it might take days. It is recommended that individuals be prepared for a minimum of two weeks (an increase from the old standard of 72 hours). WHat Will tHe city do? The City of Lake Oswego will provide service at the highest levels possible during extreme winter weather events by: • Plowing main roads and the downtown transit core with all available equipment • Ensuring emergency calls are responded to • Responding to citizens in a timely manner • Keeping sidewalks and parking lots at open City buildings clear of snow and ice • Effectively communicating closures or changes in services • Posting closure information clearly on City buildings • Communicating regular updates by using the City website (www.ci.oswego.or.us) and Facebook page, Twitter, email distribution, list serves, and local media such as the Lake Oswego Review and The Oregonian • Identifying a warming center if needed Safety for the public and staff is important to all of us, and we will be doing our part to provide the best service possible in any extreme condition. Did you know... Lake Oswego City Code requires property owners to keep sidewalks and the public right-of- way adjoining their property free from ice, snow, rocks, leaves and other debris. In addition, property owners must keep sidewalks, the street and the public right-of-way adjoining their property free from projecting or overhanging bushes, brush and limbs below nine feet under any circumstance, or that may otherwise obstruct vehicles or pedestrians or make their passage unsafe. Project alert & codered The Adult Community Center (ACC), in partnership with the Police and Fire Departments, has developed a program for older adults living in Lake Oswego. Project Alert provides a daily call to participants during times of emergencies and provides assistance as needed. When the program is activated, ACC volunteers make daily calls to each registered participant. Special needs and concerns are relayed to ACC staff for follow-up. This program operates only during times of emergencies, such as prolonged heat, severe winter storms, and power outages. For more information or to register, visit www.ci.oswego. or.us/acc or call 503-635-3758. Project Alert is in addition to CodeRED, the City’s emergency notification system which distributes emergency messages via telephone, text or email to registered participants in the community at a rate of 1,000 calls per minute. To be added to this emergency call list, register online at www.ci.oswego. or.us/citymanager/code-red-emergency-notification, or call the Citizen Information Center at 503-635-0257. Registration is confidential, free, and easy. PloWinG routes The City will use all available equipment to clear main roads for emergency responders, vehicles, and pedestrian safety. Once main roads are addressed, Operations crews will focus on other streets, if possible. For questions, call Lake Oswego Public Works - Operations at 503-635-0280.you’re fine... is your neiGHbor? Did you know that elderly people account for the largest percentage of hypothermia victims? Many elderly people literally “freeze to death” in their own homes after being exposed to dangerously cold indoor temperatures, or are asphyxiated because of improper use of fuels, such as charcoal briquettes, which produce carbon monoxide. Take time this winter to check on neighbors who may require assistance such as elderly people, people with disabilities and those with small children. Be a good neighbor - stop by to see if they need help clearing their walk or driveway, check on them before you go to the grocery store, and make sure they are warm and have something to eat. Install and maintain CO alarms to avoid the risk of CO poisoning. Gas leak If you detect a strong natural gas odor or hear gas blowing, your home or business may have a leak. If you smell rotten eggs, leave the area and call NW Natural at 800-882-3377. Here are some other steps to take if a natural gas leak is detected: • Do not use your telephone. This includes cellular phones and all types of portable communication and electronic devices that have a battery. These can spark and create a source of ignition. • Do not light matches or create any other source of ignition. • Do not operate ANY electrical switch, including lights, on or off. This could create a spark. • Evacuate everyone from the area. food safety in a PoWer outaGe Storing food, not to mention cooking it, can be a challenge without power. Without power to your refrigerator and freezer, the safety of food is a concern. Knowing ways to keep food safe when the power goes out will help reduce the worry about what is safe to eat and minimize the potential loss of food. While the power is out, your food can be saved by following these simple steps: Frozen food - If your freezer is full, food will stay frozen for about two days. If it is less than half full, food will stay frozen for about one day. Cover the freezer with blankets or sleeping bags to further insulate the freezer and help food stay frozen longer. After power is restored, check all frozen foods to determine the extent of thawing. Dispose of any food that is discolored or smells spoiled. If in doubt, throw it out. Refrigerated food - To avoid losing the cold air in your refrigerator, don’t open doors unnecessarily. Meat and fish spoil quickly at temperatures above 40oF. Other quick-spoiling foods include milk, custards, creamed foods and any foods containing mayonnaise or eggs. Cooked and cured meat will keep for several days in a closed refrigerator. Hard cheeses keep well, even at room temperature. Again, if in doubt, throw it out. You might also try placing bags of ice in the refrigerator or place food in a cooler or ice chest. How would you cook if you had no power? Do you know where your camping stove is, and is it ready to be used? Spending just a little bit of time arranging your garage and pantry will help you get a meal going safely. If you have any questions or have problems with your smoke alarm, or are in need of an alarm, please call the Lake Oswego Fire Department. it’s time to cHeck your smoke alarm! Daylight Saving Time ends Sunday, November 2 Smoke kills...Most fire deaths and injuries are caused by smoke not flames. They occur at night while victims are asleep. Smoke alarms won’t prevent fires, but they will increase your chances of getting out and calling the fire department. Working smoke alarms more than double your chance of surviving a fire. Oregon’s Smoke Alarm Law requires all smoke alarms sold in the state to have a 10-year lithium battery with a hush feature. If your smoke alarms are ten years old or older, you should replace them with a new 10-year lithium battery smoke detector. If your smoke alarm is less than ten years old, take time to press the test button and make sure it works. You should do this every month. Newer smoke alarms have long-life batteries that you don’t need to change every year. Single family dwellings are required to have smoke alarms, per the Building Code, at the time of construction. The minimum requirements are that smoke alarms must be installed outside each sleeping area such as in a hallway. If the home has more than one level, a smoke alarm must be installed on each level. The Lake Oswego Fire Department recommends adding smoke alarms to each bedroom for additional protection. In addition, the Lake Oswego Fire Department encourages families to make a home fire escape plan and practice it. PGe offers simPle safety tiPs for customers WitH Generators If winter weather causes extended power outages, many PGE customers turn to back-up generators to power appliances and equipment. Generators may be of benefit during an outage, but if used improperly, they may cause tremendous damage, injury and even death. PGE offers these tips: • Never plug a generator into a wall outlet. Doing so may produce a dangerous back-feed of electricity into utility lines. It may also destroy your generator, damage your house wiring, start an electrical fire or electrocute a PGE lineman working outside on your lines. • Instead, plug appliances and other electrical equipment directly into your portable generator using an indoor/ outdoor, three-prong, grounded extension cord. • Set up your generator in a well-ventilated area. Because generators are fueled by gasoline and propane, they generate toxic - potentially deadly - exhaust. • If you've invested in a permanently-installed generator to power all or part of your home, you must utilize an approved transfer switch to prevent the danger of electricity back-feeding into utility lines. In order to install this type of generator, you must first receive a permit and undergo a safety inspection by a local electrical inspector prior to operation. Permanently- installed generators must also comply with National Electrical Code requirements as well as local electrical codes. • Prior to operation, thoroughly read the manufacturer's instructions to safely operate your generator. Gas sHutoff How to manually turn off your home’s main natural gas line. If you need to have your gas service turned off, call NW Natural and a technician will provide the service for you. However, should a situation arise where you need to turn off your gas supply immediately, follow this simple procedure: • Locate the shutoff valve on the riser pipe from the ground to your meter (Figure A) or on newer meters the service line going from your meter into the house (Figure B). • Use an adjustable pipe or crescent-type wrench to turn the valve a quarter turn in either direction. When the valve head is parallel to the pipe, it is in the OPEN position. • Turn the valve head crosswise (perpendicular) to the pipe, and it will be in the OFF position. There are also natural gas shutoff valves on the lines fueling individual pieces of equipment. Once the gas is off, leave it off. Call your NW Natural office when you are ready for the gas to be restarted. A qualified service technician will check your system, turn on your service and relight the appliances for you. be Warm & safe tHis Winter! Did you know that heating equipment is one of the leading causes of home fire deaths? Remember: • Keep anything that can burn at least three-feet away from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or portable space heater. • Never use your oven to heat your home. • Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional. • Turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed. • Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters. • Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home. • Test smoke alarms monthly. Know before you go... www.TripCheck.com red cross first aid aPP The First Aid app is, available for iPhone and Android devices, can be found in the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store by searching for American Red Cross. Other apps are also available, including an earthquake app. Remember - apps can help prepare people for disasters, but they are not a substitute for training. For information on Red Cross First Aid and CPR/AED training, visit redcross.org/takeaclass. Features of the First Aid app include: • Simple step-by-step instructions guide you through everyday first aid scenarios. • Videos and animations make learning First Aid fun and easy. • Preloaded content means you have instant access to all safety information at anytime, even without reception or an Internet connection. • Interactive quizzes allow you to earn badges that you can share with your friends and show off your lifesaving knowledge. tiPs to PreVent Water damaGe tHis Winter While winter doesn’t officially start until December 21, Lake Oswego has already experienced some cold nights. As temperatures dip below freezing, exposed or shallow buried pipes may be at risk of freezing and bursting resulting in problems when warmer temperatures return. Property owners are responsible for maintaining plumbing from their meter to throughout their house. To help prevent frozen and bursting pipes, take a few preventative measures before the freezing temperatures arrive: • Drain your irrigation system or have it “blown out” using an air compressor. • Insulate valves/backflow equipment. • Cover hosebibs with Styrofoam covers and wrap free standing garden spigots in weatherproof insulation or pipe insulation to at least 8” below ground. • Close foundation vents to keep cold air from getting under the house and damaging exposed pipes. • Keep minimal heat on in a vacant house. Or if you are leaving the house for an extended period of time, set your thermostat to between 50 and 60 degrees to maintain a sufficient indoor temperature to protect appliances and indoor pipes in the kitchen, bathrooms, laundry room, or any other room with water or drain lines. • Wrap water heaters that are in unheated parts of the house to prevent freezing and to save energy. • Drain water features/ponds to avoid damage to liners and materials. If your water feature is used in the winter, make sure the water is continually flowing to prevent freezing. • During the worst freezing weather, let a thin stream of water run from the faucets located farthest from the street and open cabinet doors under the sinks. If a water pipe freezes: • Do not try to thaw pipes with an open flame of any kind. • Shut off the water at the main shut-off valve. • Open faucets. • Gradually warm the frozen pipe by one of the following methods: expose the area to inside heat; use a blow dryer; wrap the pipe with a heating pad; beam a heat lamp eight inches or more from the pipe; or wrap the pipe with rags and pour hot water on it. If a water pipe bursts: • Turn off the water at the main shut-off valve. • Open all the faucets. • Place a bucket underneath the leak until the pipe can be repaired. • Call a plumber. recyclinG and GarbaGe To help ensure the safety of the public and its employees, if extreme weather conditions occur, Republic Services may delay garbage and recycling collection services. Services will continue the following day if conditions improve. If conditions do not improve and your collection is missed, please store material on your property until your next regularly-scheduled collection day. A double amount will be collected at no additional charge. For questions regarding service, visit Republic Services at www.lakeoswego.disposal.com or call 503-636-3011. requestinG city serVices App available for your iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch Would you like to report a pothole, missing street sign or plugged catch basin? Reporting these types of issues is easy! Since August 2011, the City has accepted service requests through an iPhone app. The iPhone app is free and can be obtained by searching for the “Citizen Request Tracker” in the app store. When a concern is identified, use the app to take a picture, add a description, and send it to the City. Using the iPhone’s GPS technology, the app automatically pinpoints the exact location of the concern. If you don’t have an iPhone, a request can be submitted the following four ways: • Online at www.ci.oswego.or.us/publicworks/citizen-request-tracker. • On your own Facebook page by typing in the search bar “Citizen Request Tracker” and downloading the app to your page. • Calling Public Works - Operations at 503-635-0280 during business hours, Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. • In person at the Public Works Operations Facility, 5705 Jean Road, during regular business hours. Water sHutoff Make sure you know where the main shut-off valve for your plumbing is located and how to turn it off. If you need help locating your water shut-off valve or turning off your water at the meter, call Lake Oswego Public Works - Operations at 503- 635-0280. traVelinG tHis Winter? Oregon’s beautiful scenery is a year-round source of enjoyment. Driving in Oregon’s winters, however, can be challenging. Arrive safely at your destination by following these recommendations: • Before you go, visit www.TripCheck.com or call 5-1-1 for the latest in road conditions, weather forecast, chain requirements, and incident information. • Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route. Check in when you’ve reached your destination. • Don’t use cruise control in wet, icy, or snowy weather. • Keep your car’s gas tank full for emergency use and to keep the fuel line from freezing. • Put together a separate disaster supplies kit for the trunk of each car used by members of your household. If you should become stranded during a winter storm, these items will make you more comfortable until the storm passes. The kit should include: • Several blankets or sleeping bags • Rain gear and extra sets of dry clothing, mittens, socks, and a wool cap • Extra newspapers for insulation • Plastic bags for sanitation • Canned fruit, nuts, and high energy “munchies.” Non-electric can opener if necessary • Several bottles of water. Eating snow will lower your body temperature. If necessary, melt it first • Cans of broth or soup • A small shovel, a pocket knife, and small tools, such as pliers, a wrench, and screwdriver • A small sack of sand for generating traction under wheels, a set of tire chains or traction mats • Jumper cables • A first aid kit and necessary medications • A flashlight with extra batteries • A candle in a metal can or other fireproof container. While candles are generally not recommended in disaster situations, having one in your car can be a source of heat and light if you are stranded Matches Cards, games, and puzzles A brightly colored cloth to tie to the antenna • M • M • M Emergency Information: 503-635-0257 www.ci.oswego.or.us/citymanager/emergency-information 2015 emerGency PreParedness calendars Get your free calendar today! This free calendar focuses on topics that help you prepare for the unexpected: • How to prepare for severe weather and other emergencies • What to do during a flood or landslide • Earthquake and tsunami preparedness • What to do with animals during an evacuation • Fire prevention • Medical emergencies and poisonings This calendar also includes a comprehensive list of public safety organizations you may need and an emergency contact section where you can keep track of all your emergency contacts. To order your free calendar online or to preview the calendar, visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/citymanager/ emergency-preparedness-calendar. You can also contact Bonnie Hirshberger at 503-675-3992 or bhirshberger@ci.oswego.or.us for a copy. PrePare to minimize your stress Often it is the simplest of things that prevent a minor problem from turning into a huge frustration or a crisis. In addition to a good supply of food (for humans and pets), water, good flashlights and plenty of batteries, having the following items easily accessible can help you weather the storm: • A shovel to keep your home accessible when there is snow, ice or piles from plowing on sidewalks, walkways and driveways • Traction aids for your car and feet - sand, gravel, or kitty litter as well as good snow/warm shoes or traction devices to clip on your shoes • Chains, snow tires or a 4-wheel/all-wheel drive car that has plenty of gas; or a plan to use TriMet • An alternative heat source or dry wood for the fireplace (with a clean fireplace and chimney) • Prescription medications and necessary over-the- counter items • Internet access to work, school/work projects and key contacts City of Lake Oswego - Citizen Information Center 503-635-0257, www.ci.oswego.or.us City facility closure information Lake Oswego Public Works Operations 503-635-0280 City Operations information including plowing plan, broken City water pipes, downed trees, storm drain blockage and sewer overflows Republic Services of Lake Oswego 503-636-3011, www.lakeoswego.disposal.com Garbage and recycling information PGE - 503-228-6322 Electrical outages or downed power lines NW Natural Gas - 503-226-4211 Line locates or if you smell gas Police - 503-635-0238 (Non-Emergency)911 in case of emergency Fire - 503-635-0275 (Non-Emergency)911 in case of emergency TriMet - 503-238-7433 press “2”Bus routes, schedules and snow delay information Lake Oswego School District 503-534-2000, www.loswego.k12.or.us School closure information numbers you need to knoW don’t forGet your Pet! There is a common misconception that pets will be "fine" if left outside. This is not true! All pets need adequate shelter from the elements and insulation against cold weather. Here are some tips for optimizing your animal's comfort and well-being: • When the temperatures dip to freezing, it's time to give the outdoor cat and dog a break and invite them in. • Never let your dog off the leash on snow or ice - dogs can lose their scent and easily become lost. More dogs are lost during the winter than during any other season, so make sure yours always wears ID tags. • Outdoor cats will seek warmth and sometimes this includes under the hoods of cars. If there are outdoor cats in your area, bang loudly on the car hood before starting the engine to give the cat a chance to escape. • Thoroughly wipe off your pet's legs and stomach when he comes in out of the sleet, snow or ice. He can ingest salt, antifreeze or other potentially dangerous chemicals while licking his paws. • Never leave your dog or cat alone in a car during cold weather. A car can act as a refrigerator in the winter, holding in the cold. • If you live near a pond or lake, don't allow your pets to run loose. They may head for thin ice and fall through if they are not familiar with icy ponds. storm clean-uP & tHe tree code Winter storms and strong winds can cause damage to trees. In order to protect Lake Oswego’s natural setting, the City requires both homeowners and businesses to obtain a permit to remove a tree. Types of permits include: Emergency Tree Permit - issued for trees that present an immediate danger of collapse and represent a clear and present hazard to persons or property. “Immediate danger of collapse” means that the tree is leaning severely, the surrounding soil is heaving and there is a significant likelihood that the tree will topple or otherwise fail before a tree removal permit can be obtained through a non-emergency process. Pictures are required showing the situation that created the emergency. Hazard Tree Permit - issued for trees that are cracked, split, leaning or physically damaged to the degree that it is clear that the tree is likely to fail and injure persons or property and where pruning will not alleviate the hazard. This application requires a Hazard Evaluation Form completed by a Certified Arborist and photos of the damaged tree. A permit is not required to remove downed trees. However, pictures are encouraged for documentation. For more information on the City’s tree code, call the Community Development Department at 503-635-0290 or go to Chapter 55 TREES at www.codepublishing.com/or/lakeoswego/. Pet Emergency Kit Your pet's emergency kit should include: food, water, pet medicines, collar and leash, blankets, cat litter, litter box, paper towels, newspapers, plastic trash bags and cleaning supplies, and photos of you and your pet for identification purposes. In addition, it should include registration, vaccination and medical records. ready your trees for Winter Large trees are an extremely valuable asset to both the individual property owner and the community. An investment in pruning or inspection can help prevent damage from wind, snow or ice, and help preserve those irreplaceable older trees that add so much to the character and heritage of our city. • Prune your trees to remove dead or weakened limbs starting when they are young. DON’T TOP TREES! Strategic pruning to prevent branch failure is a good idea for both the trees and the people who live around them. Trees that are pruned regularly should be more resistant to storm damage as a result of the removal of structurally weak branches, decreased surface area of lateral branches and decreased wind resistance. • Hire an Arborist who is affiliated with the International Society of Arboriculture and listed in the yellow pages under "Trees" with the ISA logo, or "ISA Certified Arborist" logo, displayed in their advertisements. Planning staff can also provide a list of local ISA Certified Arborists for your convenience, but cannot recommend one over another. Please do your due diligence before you hire someone to work on your trees. • Keep your trees healthy by caring for them all year long. Proper watering, mulching, fertilizing and pruning will help them be an asset to your property and the community for years to come. • If you have a valuable older tree that is unique due to its size, character or rarity, you may consider contacting Planning staff at 503-635-0290 about the Heritage Tree Program. This program recognizes significant trees with a plaque. New trees are added to the Heritage Tree map annually and celebrated during Arbor Week, always the first full week in April.