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September 2014 Hello LOSeptember 2014THE OFFICIAL NEWSLETTER OF THE CITY OF LAKE OSWEGOHello 2 Sensitive Lands Revisions Streetlight Upgrade Construction & Road Closures Rules for Posting Political Signs 3 Parks & Recreation Drivers Needed City Library 4 Help Make LO Age-Friendly Eco Film Festival Iron Mountain Nature Walk Trolley is Back Community Calendar Insert Follow Your Art! Water Conservation For inFormation about the City and its serviCes, go to www.Ci.oswego.or.us or Call 503-635-0257. O . O L . *****ECRWSS***** POSTAL CUSTOMER Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID Permit 124 Lake Oswego, OR Inside DOWNSIZING "Let's Share Housing" returns to the ACC on September 8 from 9 to 10:30am on the hot topic of Downsizing. Michele Fiasca, co-founder of “Let’s Share Housing,” along with Zoe Morrison, operate a Portland-based non-profit that assists persons who want to explore the concept of shared housing. This program will assist people who are considering sharing their home or becoming a housemate with another person to decrease the number and quantity of possessions in their lives. There is no cost, but you must preregister by calling 503-635-3758. Continental breakfast and coffee served. BACK TO SCHOOL - SEPTEMBER 2 SAFETY TIPS FOR PARENTS AND STUDENTS As school starts up again, traffic across the city will increase and our streets and sidewalks will see more activity. Here are a few tips to keep everyone safe: When driving: • Observe 20 mph school speed zones (there are 17 in Lake Oswego!) • Do not pass a school bus with red lights flashing • Stop for pedestrians ready to cross at marked or unmarked crosswalks When walking: • Walk on sidewalks and pathways where available • Walk as a group for added safety and fun! • Cross at intersections not mid-block • Make eye contact with drivers, make sure they stop When riding a bicycle: • Wear your helmet, it’s Oregon law for persons under age 16 • Ride single-file and with traffic • Watch for vehicles that may turn across your path When taking the school bus: • Wait on your side of the street, cross to the bus when the crossing arms are out • Stand about six feet away (three giant steps) from the curb when waiting PHOTO CONTEST Photographers are invited to enter their best images in the Sixth Annual City of Lake Oswego Photo Contest. Entries need to be submitted by 5 p.m., Thursday, September 4. For contest details, visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/publicaffairs/photo-contest. Continued on page 2 CASCADIA EARTHQUAKE PRESENTATION - SEPTEMBER 25, 6-8 PM, WEST END BUILDING * While most people know that California gets frequent earthquakes, they may not know that Oregon is at risk from very large earthquakes. These earthquakes on the Cascadia Subduction Zone can be over 9.0 magnitude and have a region- wide impact. The Cascadia Subduction Zone represents the single largest hazard to the people and built environment of Oregon. On September 25, Dr. Althea Rizzo, the Geological Hazard Program Coordinator at the Oregon Office of Emergency Management, will cover the latest understanding on the natural hazard and its expected impact on Oregon. Learning how to prepare and protect your family, home and business starts by attending this presentation. Being able to recover quickly from a catastrophic event is a choice that needs to be made before the event. This is a free presentation but because space is limited, pre-registration is required. Contact Bonnie Hirshberger at bhirshberger@ci.oswego.or.us or 503-675-3992, to register. * Please note new location - WEB, 4101 Kruse Way DRUG TAKE BACK EVENT SEPTEMBER 27, 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M. To help citizens properly dispose of unwanted or expired prescription medicines, the City is holding a one-day-only drug take-back event. This collection event will take place at the Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, 505 G Avenue. Unwanted prescription medicines will be collected from individual households only. Unknown medicines and veterinary medications will also be accepted. Medications cannot be accepted from businesses such as nursing homes, doctor’s offices or any other institution or business. If you have any questions, please contact Bonnie Hirshberger at 503-675-3992 or bhirshberger@ci.oswego.or.us. No sharps/syringes/EpiPens, over-the-counter medicines or supplements such as A MESSAGE FROM MAYOR STUDEBAKER This has been a busy summer for our maintenance and road building operations. Add into that the rebuild of Kerr Parkway, and the construction work involved in laying the pipe through the city for the water project, and you have the makings of a transportation nightmare. Like everyone else, I have had to change my usual routes and discover new ways to get to locations such as Summit Drive. The only consolation I can offer is the promise of much improved infrastructure by the time all this is done. For those of you (such as my wife) who wonder if the roads will truly be brought back to good condition, I can tell you I have been assured they will be. I have been told that the narrower streets, such as B Avenue, will get a complete new overlay. Iron Mountain will get a new overlay on the side of the street affected by the construction. I do want to thank you all for the understanding and patience you BLOCK 137 (WIZER) DEVELOPMENT The Development Review Commission (DRC) recently voted 3 to 2 to deny the application to redevelop Block 137 into three separate four-story buildings including 36,500 square feet of retail and 207 residential units. The decision came after hours of public testimony and deliberation by DRC members. The application was turned down for three reasons: 1) the location of residential units on the ground floor of one of the buildings; 2) two of the three buildings, due to their massing, did not meet the definition of “village character”; and 3) the plan did not include enough loading areas. The decision by DRC has been appealed by the applicant and will go to the City Council for an appeal hearing. This hearing is scheduled to begin Monday, September 22 at City Hall. For more information, please visit the project website: www.ci.oswego.or.us/planning/lu-13-0046-request- development-review-permit-construct-mixed-use-project. Continued on page 2 Inside Skip O’Neill City Councilor 503-781-7664 (Cell) Lauren Hughes City Councilor 503-734-6925 (Cell) Kent Studebaker Mayor 503-201-2270 (Cell) Jeff Gudman City Councilor 503-780-1524 (Cell) Donna Jordan City Councilor 503-675-1120 (Home) Jon Gustafson City Councilor 503-348-5191 (Cell) Karen Bowerman City Councilor 503-858-5983 (Cell) 2 City Council 503-635-0215 503-697-6594 (fax) City Council e-mail: council@ci.oswego.or.us City Manager Scott Lazenby 503-635-0215 have shown. Our staff has also responded to several complaints of undue inconvenience to try to alleviate noise and safety concerns. Speaking of staff, there has been some recent expression of concern that staff is driving the direction of city activities. First, a little information about Council’s authority. We have the power to hire and fire only three people – the City Manager, the City Attorney, and the Municipal Judge. The City Manager is the person with the power to hire and fire employees. He is akin to a CEO of a 350-person business, and the City Council is akin to the Board of Directors of that business. Getting back to the issue of staff driving the direction of our activities, and at the risk of sounding naive, I have found very few instances where that seems to be occurring. If it is occurring in a way that is contrary to the path Council wants to follow, then the blame rests ultimately on us. Council is supposed to set policy and by doing so, set City direction. We cannot and should not deal with every day-to-day detail. That responsibility rests with department heads and the City Manager. Again, it is my experience so far that if Council is clear about the policy we want to prevail, staff will follow our direction. At the same time, it is up to staff to inform us how that policy can be best carried out. Sometime Council may disagree with a staff recommendation and need to provide further direction. There may also be instances when a staff member is resistant or unenthusiastic about a Council policy. We rely on our citizens to help us determine when that occurs. But please be assured that Council is working hard to be clear about our policies and to get them fully implemented. I hope all of you are enjoying the beautiful weather we are having and are also enjoying the many activities available to you here. We have the concerts, the movies in the park, the arts, the golf course, and the lake. I find I have to remind myself occasionally to take the time to enjoy the ambiance here, particularly before the winter weather hits, and we have to spend so much more time indoors. MAYOR STUDEBAKER Continued from page 1 STREETLIGHT UPGRADE LED UPGRADE TO START IN OCTOBER While driving through the City, it is impossible to miss the new vibrantly white LED streetlights. There are many benefits of LEDs. LEDs promote safer roads, provide better color rendition, lower energy costs, increase sustainability, and discourage crime. The City is making preparations for the phase 2a project to upgrade approximately 800 additional streetlights to LEDs. This project will install screw-in LED lights inside all of the City’s existing Town & Country-style streetlights and will replace the outer housings of fixtures that are damaged. Also, the City is planning on upgrading the Acorn fixtures to LEDs in the downtown and Marylhurst areas. The City anticipates starting installations citywide in October. This phase of the LED project, expected to cost $200,000, will save the City about $55,000 per year in reduced energy and maintenance costs. Quick Facts for the Completed Phase 1 LED Project • 1,406 Streetlights were upgraded to LEDs. • The project cost a total of $429,026 which was about $41,000 under budget. • The City was awarded an Energy Trust of Oregon Incentive for $80,086 in one-time revenue. • The old fixtures were recycled, and the City received $5,292. • The City will save $132,000 per year in lower payments to Portland General Electric (PGE). • The project will be paid back by the end of 2016. • The new LED fixtures are under warranty for 10 years, but are expected to last for 20 years. • In 20 years, the City will have saved about $2.3 million through lower payments to PGE. • The project was completed seven months early. • The City received a total of six complaints and all were resolved. • The project will save 740 tons of carbon dioxide each year which is equal to taking 141 passenger vehicles off the road permanently. PROPOSED SENSITIVE LANDS REVISIONS One of the City Council’s current priorities is to revise the Sensitive Lands program and create a new approach to natural resource protection that reduces the regulatory burden on private property owners. The City is proposing to replace the Sensitive Lands regulations with a new Natural Resource Protection Program that: • Aligns the City’s regulations for stream and wetland protection with minimum Metro Title 3 requirements; • Increases protection of riparian and upland wildlife habitat (Metro Title 13 resources) on public property and private open space tracts; and • Replaces Title 13 regulations on private property with incentive- based programs. In June, a draft framework of the new program was presented for Council feedback. In July, the Council received information on how to best coordinate the proposal with the City’s compliance of the Clean Water Act – specifically with the requirement to maintain tree cover and riparian vegetation to shade streams and protect water quality. Using new topographic data available this fall, the City will perform an analysis to ensure the new program meets federal, state, and regional requirements. To perform this analysis and make any needed adjustments to the program, the timeline for completing the Sensitive Lands revisions has been extended into 2015. In the interim, the City will pursue a series of quick fix code amendments to address specific issues with Sensitive Lands regulations. The proposed amendments will be available for public review in September. The Planning Commission and Council will hold study sessions in October and hearings in November and December. If you have questions about the Sensitive Lands revisions or interim code amendments, please contact Scot Siegel, Planning and Building Services Director, at 503-635-0290 or ssiegel@ci.oswego.or.us. RULES FOR POSTING POLITICAL SIGNS Local elections will take place on Tuesday, November 4. Before posting political signs, here are some helpful reminders: • No application or fees are required to post a sign on your own private property. • No sign shall extend into or over the public right-of- way of any street. • Signs on public property (such as schools, parks, fire stations, and City Hall) or placed in the public right- of-way are subject to removal and a $26 retrieval fee per sign. To determine where the public right-of-way is, identify markers such as fire hydrants, sidewalks, streetlights, traffic signs, or utility poles and place your sign on the private property side of these markers. • The maximum sign area is six square feet. • City Ordinance prohibits attaching signs to trees, shrubbery, utility poles, or traffic control signs or devices, and prohibits the use of balloons or other moving, flashing, or animated parts. • Signs must be removed no later than the fifth day following the election (November 9). CONSTRUCTION & ROAD CLOSURES Water Partnership pipeline construction and road closures during September: • Iron Mtn. Blvd. – paving continues in early September. A single lane will be open during paving, so expect delays, or find an alternate route. • B Avenue – crews are installing a storm drain line on B Avenue between State and 7th Street. One block and one intersection will be closed at a time between 7am and 6pm, Monday through Friday as work progresses west. • Laurel Street and Erickson Street – various segments of these roads are closed to through traffic between 7am and 6pm, Monday through Friday through October as pipeline work progresses. • Highway 43 – crews are expected to begin laying pipe on Hwy 43 near Laurel Street in mid-September. Work will progress south towards West Linn. All work on Hwy 43 will be conducted at night between 8pm and 5am. In most areas on Hwy 43, two-way traffic will be maintained during construction. All lanes of traffic will be open during the day. Your patience is appreciated during construction. For the most up-to-date information on construction, visit the “work underway” page on lotigardwater.org, email lotwater@ci.oswego.or.us, or call 503-697-6502. vitamins, will be collected. For information on how you can safely dispose of these items, call Metro Recycling at 503-234-3000. Please put all pill/tablet medications into a zip-seal bag. We do not want the plastic prescription containers. If you bring in a liquid medication, please put the bottle in a sealable plastic bag to prevent leaks. For more disposal options, visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/ police/drug-medicine-disposal. DRUG Continued from page 1 For more information call: Main Number, 503-636-7628 Reference Desk Number, 503-675-2540 or visit www.ci.oswego.or.us/library 3 y o u r C o m m u n i t y r e s o u r C e F o r i n F o r m a t i o n a n d e n r i C h m e n tCITY LIBRARY d i s C o v e r a C t i v e l i v i n gPARKS & RECREATION West End Building, 4101 Kruse Way For more information, call 503-675-2549 or visit www.loparks.org. WELCOME TO FALL! Did you know that online registration is the fastest and easiest way to register for fall classes and activities? Parks & Recreation publishes seasonal activity guides that provide information about classes, activities, special events, and camps offered by the department. The fall activity guides were delivered to Lake Oswego homes and businesses on August 9 and is also viewable at www.ci.oswego.or.us/parksrec/parks-recreation-current- catalog. After you decide on your next adventure, visit www.loparks.org or call 503-675-2549 to register. ACTIVITIES - GET OUTSIDE AND EXERCISE! FREE Thursday One-Mile Cross Country Runs Meet the LOHS and LHS cross country coaches and run with the team members! Pre-register at www. lakeoswegosports.com or arrive by 4:15pm to register on the day. Runs start at 4:30pm. September 11 - (LOHS XC) at Uplands Elementary September 18 - (LHS XC) at Pilkington Park September 25 - (LOHS XC) at Uplands Elementary Boot Camp This class increases heart rate health and strength safely, effectively, and comfortably. Have fun while getting fit! This class can be modified for all levels of fitness. Tuesdays and Thursdays, September 9 through October 30, 9-10am. ACC Members $71, all others $91. LEARN NEW SKILLS TO WOW YOUR FRIENDS 50+ Computer Learning Center The ACC offers a wide variety of computer classes. If you’re interested in learning new computer programs and increasing your computer knowledge, the ACC Computer Learning Center is a great place to start! Upcoming classes include: Beginning Excel, Intro to eBay, Intro to Twitter, Intro to Windows 8, Intro to MAC Operating System, Intro to Switch to MAC from Windows. For more information on classes or to register, visit www.lo-clc.org or call 503-635-3758. Cooking Classes at Historic Luscher Farm Hands-on fun in the kitchen! Learn important cooking skills while preparing a healthy meal using produce from the Children’s Garden. Allow creativity to mesh with culinary techniques for exciting results! Kids in the Kitchen: Garden Tomato Soup and Grilled Cheese. Ages 6-15, Saturday, September 20, 11am- 1pm, Res $30/Non-Res $45. Herb Crackers with Home Made Cheese. Ages 16+, Saturday, September 20, 2-4pm, Res $30/Non-Res $45. CHECK OUT OUR NEW ACTIVITIES FOR FALL Campfire Evening at the Farm Join friends and family at Luscher Farm for a campfire evening complete with s’more making, camp songs, and ghost stories. All ages. Friday, September 19, 7-9pm, Res $10/Non-Res $15. Tai Chi for Better Balance This research-based program combines traditional tai chi forms with therapeutic exercises to improve balance and reduce falls. Ages 50+. Tuesdays and Thursdays, September 9 to December 11, 10:15-11:15am ACC Members $65, all others $98. Intermediate and Advanced class also offered 9-10am, same dates. Simply Music Rhapsody Try-It-Out Day Here’s your opportunity to check out what our new Simply Music Rhapsody program is all about! Come to the WEB on Friday, September 5, 11:45am to 12:30pm with your 6-month to 2-year-old and experience the interactive class that focuses on coordination, listening, and language skills. Class session occurs September 3 through October 24. Artful Story Catching A new and unique workshop that combines guided autobiography exercises with the creative process of mixed media art. Capture personal stories, connect with others and achieve greater personal insight while writing about life experiences. Ages 50+, Saturdays, September 13 and 20, 10am to noon, ACC Members $25, all others $35. DON’T FORGET! Indoor Playground returns September 3, 9:30am to 11:30am. This is an ideal program for parents and caregivers of children ages 0-6. This is a drop-in program Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 9:30- 11:30am, Drop In Fee $3, Additional Sibling Fee $2, 10-visit punch card $25. McKenzie Lounge at the WEB has an Open House for the entire month of September. Monday to Friday, 3-7pm (2pm on early release Thursdays), junior high and high school students are welcome to see the new additions and enjoy a pool table, ping pong, air hockey, skee ball, 3 TVs, and video games. First Tuesday Music Series - OCP Quartet September 2, 7pm The OCP Quartet was formed by members of the Oregon Chamber Players in 2002 out of necessity after countless requests from people wanting a string quartet to play at concerts and other special events. Author Program - Brian Doyle Tuesday, September 9, 7pm Doyle, whose sprawling Oregon novel Mink River was the Lake Oswego Reads selection in 2012, is the author of many other books of essays and fiction, notably the headlong sea novel The Plover. Performing Arts Series- Ricardo Cárdenas Wednesday, September 10, 1pm Guitarist Cárdenas performs his extraordinary range of classical and folkloric music from Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina, and Chile. New at the Library! Tech Discussion Group Friday, September 12, 10:30 to 11:30am This new group will meet the second Friday of each month. Come participate in this discussion group, share knowledge and questions about the latest trends. 3-D Fridays Fridays, September 5 & 19, 3 to 4pm Come see the Library’s FlashForge Creator 3-D printer in action, and hear a presentation about the potential of 3-D printing. Special Presentation - Louise Lague Tuesday, September 23, 7pm Be Happy! The 7 Habits of Highly Happy People with Mental Health Counselor Louise Lague, MA NCC, in a presentation that uncovers the aspects of happiness from the literature of positive psychology. People will actually feel happier on the way out! Sign up for free classes for adults held at the Library: • Keyboarding & Internet Searching • Art in the Morning • Super Patron • Search the Internet with Google • eBook Thursdays Call the Reference Department for more information and dates and times at 503-675-2540. PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN Storytime Beginning on Tuesday, September 9 Baby Storytime (birth - 18 months) Tuesdays at 11:45am; Toddler Storytime (19 months - 3 years old) Wednesdays at 11:45 am; Preschool Storytime (3 - 5 year olds) Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 10:30am. Special Series: Chirp Musical Laptime with Keeley St. Clair Thursdays at 10:30am Families with babies from birth through 18 months are invited to musical laptimes. Chirp is an early childhood music program that focuses on healthy brain development, deepening bonds, and the magic of creative self-expression through music and movement. St. Clair is a board-certified music therapist who began her practice in Portland-area hospital pediatrics and is an Earthtones Music Therapy clinician. Lego Club for Grades 3-6 Monday, September 8, 4 to 5:30pm Kids are invited to work on projects and learn more about LEGOs with Blair Amos. Materials are provided but registration is required. Symphony Storytimes (ages 3 to 5) 10:30 to 11:30am Symphony storytimes introduce children to symphony instruments in a fun format that pairs literature and music. Oregon Symphony musicians are featured in the program, which includes music, education, and stories. Each session focuses on one of the instrument families, including strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion. At the end of the storytimes, kids can try out the instruments. • September 10 - Gayle Budd O’Grady on cello • September 16 - Karen Wagner on oboe • September 24 - Dave Bamonte on trumpet • September 30 - Michael Roberts on percussion Red Yarn: Folksongs and Puppetry Saturday, September 13, 11am Andy Furgeson, otherwise known as Red Yarn, is a dynamic children’s performer who weaves live music, puppetry, and interactive storytelling into engaging shows with an emphasis on reinvigorating American folklore for younger generations. PROGRAMS FOR TEENS Poetry Slam Thursday, September 11, 7 to 8pm, Main Floor The Library’s Teen Board presents an open mic opportunity for teens in grades 8-12 to share their passion for poetry. Teen poets are warmly invited to participate. DRIVERS NEEDED HELP TO SUPPORT LAKE OSWEGO’S MEALS ON WHEELS PROGRAM Looking for a volunteer opportunity that only takes a few hours per week? Lake Oswego’s Adult Community Center is in desperate need of substitute drivers for its Meals on Wheels program. As a substitute, volunteers don’t have to commit to a regular schedule. Meals are delivered Monday, Wednesday and Friday from approximately 11am to 12:30pm. Last year, a record number of meals - over 14,000 - were delivered to seniors and disabled residents in Lake Oswego. If you can help with this worthy program, please let us know. For further information, interested persons can contact Berta Derman at 503-675-6394 or bderman@ci.oswego.or.us. 44 This newsletter is printed on 100% recycled content paper, using soy-based ink. Citizen Information Specialist and HelloLO Editor Bonnie Hirshberger 503-675-3992 bhirshberger@ci.oswego.or.us For inFormation about the City and its serviCes, go to www.Ci.oswego.or.us or Call 503-635-0257. Event dates are subject to change. More details are available online at: www.ci.oswego.or.us/calendar. For more information, call 503-675-3992. September 1 Monday • City Holiday - CITY OFFICES CLOSED 2 Tuesday • City Council Regular Meeting, 6:15pm • Library Music Series, 7pm 3 Wednesday • DRC Meeting • NRAB Meeting, 6:30pm • First Addition/Forest Hills Neighborhood Coordinating Meeting, 6:30pm 4 Thursday • Deadline for Photo Contest, 5pm 5 Friday • Unveil Your Art Celebration, MPP, 5:30pm 6 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm • Mayor’s Golf Tournament • Classic Houses & History Boat Tour, 1pm • Willamette Shore Trolley rides, 1-4pm • Evergreen NA Potluck, 3-6pm 7 Sunday • Willamette Shore Trolley rides, 1-4pm • Eco Film Festival, Lake Theater, 5pm 8 Monday • Downsizing Presentation, ACC, 9-10:30am • Planning Commission, 6:30pm 9 Tuesday • Library Author Series, 7pm 10 Wednesday • Library Performing Arts Series, 1pm • HRAB Meeting, 7pm • LAB Meeting, 7pm • TAB Meeting, 7pm 11 Thursday • Lake Oswego Arts & Culture Conversation, 4:15-6pm • One Mile Cross Country Runs 12 Friday 13 Saturday • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm • Willamette Shore Trolley rides, 1-4pm • Red Yarn Folk Songs & Puppetry, Library, 11am 14 Sunday • Willamette Shore Trolley rides, 1-4pm • Eco Film Festival, Lake Theater, 2pm 15 Monday • SAB Meeting, 6:30pm • DRC Meeting 16 Tuesday • City Council Regular Meeting, 6:30pm 17 Wednesday • PRAB Meeting, WEB, 6pm 18 Thursday • One Mile Cross Country Runs 19 Friday 20 Saturday • Iron Mountain Nature Walk, 8:30am • Mayor & Neighborhood Mtg, 8:30am • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm • Willamette Shore Trolley rides, 1-4pm 21 Sunday • Willamette Shore Trolley rides, 1-4pm • Eco Film Festival, Lake Theater, 5pm 22 Monday • Special City Council Meeting 23 Tuesday • Special City Council Meeting 24 Wednesday • Special City Council Meeting 25 Thursday • One Mile Cross Country Runs • Uplands Neighborhood Association Board Mtg, 7pm • Cascadia Earthquake Presentation, WEB, 6:30pm 26 Friday 27 Saturday • Drug Take Back Event, ACC, 10am-2pm • Farmers’ Market, 8:30am-1:30pm • Green Home Tour, 1-4pm • Willamette Shore Trolley rides, 1-4pm 28 Sunday • Willamette Shore Trolley rides, 1-4pm • Eco Film Festival, Lake Theater, 2pm 29 Monday 30 Tuesday October 1 Wednesday • NRAB Meeting, 6:30pm • First Addition/Forest Hills Neighborhood Coordinating Meeting, 6:30pm 2 Thursday Community Calendar ACC Adult Community Center DRC Development Review Commission HRAB Historic Resources Advisory Board LAB Library Advisory Board LORA Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency MPP Millennium Plaza Park NA Neighborhood Association NRAB Natural Resources Advisory Board PRAB Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SAB Sustainability Advisory Board TAB Transportation Advisory Board WEB West End BuildingGlossaryECO FILM FESTIVAL SUNDAYS IN SEPTEMBER - AT THE LAKE THEATER, 106 N STATE STREET Come join us for the first ever Lake Oswego Eco Film Fest! We have selected a great set of movies to make you laugh, gasp, learn, and enjoy. Films are free for anyone who wants to come! Water Blues Green Solutions September 7, 5pm Experience the drama as people across the USA see how water impacts their lives and how people have learned to use nature to keep their rivers clean and protect their drinking water. Portland is one of the featured cities. FernGully September 14, 2pm The fairy people of FernGully have never seen humans before but when Christa sees one, Zak, she accidentally shrinks him down to her size. Then they face trouble as Zak is part of a human team who is there to change Christa’s world. How can they work out a solution? Chasing Ice September 21, 5pm Watch the drama and beauty, danger and excitement of the changing ice of the Arctic. This movie has been called hauntingly beautiful and heart stopping. Winner of multiple awards. Vanishing of the Bees September 28, 2pm This documentary looks at the mystery of the worldwide disappearance of the honeybee, creatures we rely on to put fruits and vegetables on our tables. Vanishing of the Bees unfolds as a dramatic tale of science and mystery, illuminating this extraordinary story of crisis and solutions and its greater meaning about the relationship between humankind and Mother Earth. IRON MOUNTAIN NATURE WALK On Saturday, September 20, join us for a one-hour walk through Iron Mountain Park to learn about the natural history, historical significance, and on-going restoration of one of Lake Oswego’s beautiful natural areas. Megan Big John, Lake Oswego’s Parks and Open Space Crew Leader, will lead the walk. She will be joined by Mike Buck of the Friends of Iron Mountain Park and Susanna Kuo of the Historic Resources Advisory Board. We’ll gather for the walk starting at 8:30am and will leave at 9am sharp - meet at the Brookside Road entrance to Iron Mountain Park. Be sure to dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes. Starbucks coffee and treats will be provided. For additional information, call 503-675-3737. This is an Urban & Community Forestry event coordinated by the Parks & Recreation and Planning Departments. HELP MAKE LAKE OSWEGO AGE-FRIENDLY The Lake Oswego Adult Community Center has partnered with Elders in Action to help create an “Age Friendly Lake Oswego.” For over 20 years, Elders in Action has been providing feedback to businesses in the community on how to best engage with older adults. Through a unique program, volunteers are trained to evaluate businesses and give feedback and recommendations. Last fall 22 volunteers and 5 businesses participated in a daylong event. With 10,000 people a day (in the US) turning 65, businesses’ understanding how aging may change how we engage is more important than ever. Are signs clear, menus readable, flooring safe, staff trained in communication skills – all these are factors in being Age-Friendly. If you would like feedback on your business or if you would like to become a volunteer evaluator, contact Mark Noonan at mark@eldersinaction.or or 503-235- 5474 about this year’s program. Volunteer training and business evaluations will occur on October 9 from 9am to 1:30pm. A debrief to go over the experience and results will take place on October 16. WILLAMETTE SHORE TROLLEY IS BACK! The Willamette Shore Trolley is up and operating! Rides will leave the depot - 311 N. State Street - on the hour at 1 p.m., 2 p.m., 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays through the end of September. Learn about the Willamette Shore Line’s historic past while enjoying a relaxing ride on Trolley 514 - a replica of an original trolley used in Portland in 1904 with modern safety features, wicker seats, solid brass fixtures and ornate solid oak woodwork. This scenic 40-minute, 4-mile roundtrip ride will take passengers along the shore of the Willamette River through the 1,400-foot Elk Rock Tunnel and to the 686-foot Long Trestle. The Trolley is operated by volunteer members of the nonprofit Oregon Electric Railway Historical Society. The full 5.5-mile line between Lake Oswego and Portland is expected to reopen once the Sellwood Bridge project is done and additional repairs to the Willamette Shore Line are complete. Fares: $5 for adults; $3 for children 3 to 12 years old. Photo: Trolley 514 at Elk Rock Tunnel by Dave Rowe. Once known as “Oregon’s darkest tunnel,” the Elk Rock Tunnel was completed in 1921.