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Stormwater Management Manual Appendices Appendix A Submittals Site Assessment and Feasibly Resources — A-1 Drainage Report Template — A-2 Impervious Surface Area Reduction Table — A-3 Operations and Maintenance Agreement — A-4 Sample Operations and Maintenance Plan — A-5 Stormwater Certification Form — A-6 LO SWMM 2020 Update Appendix A- 1 Site Assessment and Feasibility Resources LO SWMM 2020 Update Site Assessment and Feasibility Analysis-Site Map Item Source of Information Confirm whether item is included on site map, in drainage report text,or N/A Property Lines LOMap Lot Dimensions LOMap Contours LOMap Onsite and offsite drainage patterns Site visit Project location (township and range) LOMap Watershed (Willamette River,Tualatin LOMap River, Oswego Lake) Existing improvements with dimensions LOMap;site visit and distance from property lines Existing stormwater collection, LOMap;site visit conveyance,treatment,and flow control facilities Areas of protected native soils and/or Site visit amended soils that have been added for stormwater management function Sensitive lands delineation LOMap Wetland delineation LOMap Floodplain delineation LOMap Site Assessment and Feasibility Analysis—Other Information Depth to groundwater City/US Geological Survey(USGS) USGS depth to groundwater information is available at: http://or.water.usgs.gov/profs dir/ puz/ Suitability for infiltration- Hydrologic soils http://websoilsurvev.nres.usda.gov/ group(A, B,C,or D) app/HomePaee.htm Contours Document areas that will be protected Include soils,trees to be protected, during construction and development sensitive areas,water bodies Document areas of proposed stormwater management facilities Document limits of land disturbance and locations of proposed new/replaced impervious surface Site Assessment and Feasibility Analysis—Information to Confirm with City Landslide hazard area Consult with Planning Department Existing drywell Check with Engineering Department to confirm whether drywell is registered as UIC; request record drawings(as-builts). May need to decommission if not registered as UIC. Jurisdictional wetland;confirmation of Consult with Planning Department. sensitive lands Knowledge of decommissioned oil tank or past hazardous material storage. Confirm through soil testing(see Section 4.4). Existing trees Review Lake Oswego Tree Removal, Protection, and Care Guide. Protect existing trees by incorporating them into design,or consult with City for a Tree Removal permit. Appendix A-2 Drainage Report Template (Also see Section 3.1.1 for requirements) LO SWMM 2020 Update Drainage Report Outline City of Lake Oswego Stormwater Management Manual Cover • Project title • Project Address • Building permit number, and land-use case number • Report date • Professional Engineer's stamp and signature Table of Contents Introduction • Project Overview with list of Minimum Project Requirements (LOSWMM, Section 2.5.5) Site Assessment and Feasibility Analysis Existing Conditions • Project Location (i.e., address, cross streets) • Site Description — Site size and tax lots (i.e., tax number, lot(s) sizes) — Land use/zoning — Topography extending 100 ft beyond project boundaries — Soils — Drainage conditions (i.e., major drainage basins, local streams or creeks, outfalls, wetlands, groundwater) — Vegetation (i.e., trees, other vegetation) — Stormwater system — Utilities onsite and access points (i.e., electric, gas, sewer, water, phone, cable) — FEMA Floodplain Analysis (if applicable) • Summary of Geotechnical Report with infiltration testing results and depth to groundwater • Distance to nearest drinking water well (if proposing UlCs) • Include existing conditions map with existing stormwater system, topography, FEMA mapping, existing vegetation, existing utilities, existing structures • Include soils map (as applicable to the project) • Include map of infiltration testing locations or reference to map in Geotechnical Report • Include Impervious Area Reduction Table (See LOSWMM, AppendixA-3) LOSWMM,2020 Update Drainage Report Outline City of Lake Oswego Stormwater Management Manual Proposed Conditions • Development description, including coverage of buildings, pavement, and other impervious surfaces • Vegetation buffers and setback requirements • Proposed stormwater management facilities • Stormwater discharge points (or indicate intent for full onsite infiltration) • On a separate sheet, include proposed conditions map with proposed site use, proposed stormwater management facility locations and cross sections, and discharge points (as applicable to the project). Include dimensions with an engineering scale. Required Tables: o Basin Area Summary (Total Area, Impervious and Pervious Area) o Precipitation Depths for 24-Hour Stormwater Events (See LOSWMM, Section 4.3) o Hydrology Inputs (i.e., Curve Numbers,Time of Concentration, Land Uses, Soil Types for each drainage catchment area) o Calculated peak flows and/or total runoff volumes for Pre-Developed (CN=70) and Developed conditions Onsite Stormwater Management • Describe facilities proposed for onsite stormwater management to the MEP (LOSWMM, Section 2.5.2 and 4.1.2) • If onsite stormwater management is not feasible, include documentation of infeasibility Design for Water Quality • Describe facilities proposed for water quality treatment • Water quality facility design calculations Required Table: Water Quality Facility Design Summary (i.e., Water Quality Design Flow Rates, Water Quality Facility Design Parameters) Design for Flow Control • Describe facilities proposed for flow control treatment • Flow control facility design calculations Required Table: Flow Control Design Summary (i.e., Comparison of Pre-Developed and Flow Control Facility Release Rates, Detention Facility Design Parameters) Downstream Analysis (not required for projects that fully infiltrate the 10-year, 24-hour storm event) • Extent of downstream analysis (LOSWMM, Section 5.8) • Downstream stormwater conveyance system elements, expected flows, and existing conveyance capacity LOSWMM,2020 Update Drainage Report Outline City of Lake Oswego Stormwater Management Manual • Proposed downstream system modifications, if needed Required Table: Downstream system flow rates and existing capacity Conveyance Analysis and Design (required for Final Drainage Report) • Drainage basin Hydrologic calculations for upstream contributing areas, and onsite basins • Conveyance system hydraulic calculations Required Table: Conveyance System Flow Results and Pipe Sizing Additional Permits Summary (if applicable) • List additional permits required for the project. Examples include: o Oregon DEQ Underground Injection Control Permit or Registration o City of Lake Oswego Permits (i.e., Erosion Control Permit, NPDES 1200-C Permit, Street Opening Permit, Grading Permit, Building Permit) o State and Federal Permits (i.e., Department of State Lands Permit, US Army Corps of Engineers Permits) References Required Figures • Project Vicinity Map • Existing Conditions (vegetation, topography, soils, utilities) extending 100 ft beyond project boundaries • Proposed Site Plan with Stormwater Management Facilities and Conveyance • Stormwater Facility Cross Sections and Details • Downstream Analysis (if applicable) • Composite Utility Map Required Appendices • Geotechnical Report/ Infiltration and Soil Testing Results • Hydrology and Hydraulic Modeling Inputs and Results (i.e., Modeling Outputs, Detailed Calculations, Facility Details and Design) • Conveyance Hydrology and Hydraulic Modeling Inputs and Results • Stormwater Management Facility Details • Operation and Maintenance Plan — Describe overview of each facility, typical maintenance activities and frequency, maintenance checklists, and responsible party • Landslide Hazard and Erosion Risk Areas Report, if applicable LOSWMM,2020 Update Drainage Report Outline City of Lake Oswego Stormwater Management Manual • UIC Registration Information, if applicable LOSWMM,2020 Update Appendix A-3 Impervious Surface Reduction Table LO SWMM 2020 Update Impervious Area Reduction Table Lake Oswego Stormwater Management Manual Step 1. Calculate project's impervious surface area. Description Quantity a. Total new impervious surface (sq. ft.) • If(a) is less than 1,000 sq. ft.,the project does not need further drainage review. • If(a) is greater than or equal to 1,000 square feet and less than 3,000 square feet,the project may be classified as a Small Project. See result of(c) for final determination. • If(a) is greater than or equal to 3,000 square feet,the project is classified as a Large Project. b. Total replaced impervious surface area (sq. ft.) c. Total new plus replaced impervious surface area (sq.ft) (1) =a + b • If(c) is greater than or equal to 3,000 square feet,the project is classified as a Large Project. 1. See section 4.6 in the LOSWMM for more information Step 2. Calculate impervious surface area reduction credits Description Quantity d. Total area of green roof(sq. ft.) e. Total area of porous pavement (sq. ft.) f. Total area managed using rainwater harvesting(sq. ft.) g. Total impervious surface area reduction credits (sq. ft.) =d +e+f Step 3. Calculate remaining impervious surface area to be managed. Description Quantity Impervious surface areas to be managed (sq.ft.) =c—g LOSWMM,2020 Update Appendix A-4 Operations and Maintenance Agreement LO SWMM 2020 Update After Recording. (For County Recording Use Only) 0*0� F O�iL Return To: A.. l• n City of Lake Oswego, V 0 Attn:Stormwater Quality Specialist, P.O. Box 369, OR E G O‘-‘ Lake Oswego,OR 97034 Name of Document For Recording:Covenant for Operations and Maintenance of Private Stormwater Facilities Grantor(s): Grantor's Mailing Address: Grantee: City of Lake Oswego, PO Box 369, Lake Oswego,OR 97034 Consideration: $0.00. Tax Statement to be mailed to: No change. Recordation Authority: LOC 38.25.140(3)(a)(iii) Covenant for Operation and Maintenance of Private Stormwater Facilities The "responsible party" (including successors and assigns) named below is obligated and covenants to the City of Lake Oswego to perform the operation and maintenance of the private stormwater facility, as attached and as hereafter amended by recorded amendment. This obligation arises from the development of the Real Property described in Section B, below, and the requirements of Lake Oswego Code (LOC) 38.25.100(2), .120, and .140. A. Legal Description of Real Property Where Stormwater Facility Located: B. Legal Description of Real Property Obligated to Operate and Maintain Stormwater Facility(if different from Section A): 1 Signature and Acknowledgement (add more pages as necessary): By signing below,the Responsible Party agrees and accepts the terms and conditions of this document. Failure to comply with this O&M Plan may result in a requirement to restore the facility to the original design and in fines and/or penalties. If Signatory is a Corporation / Entity: If Signatory is not a Corporation/ Entity: Corporation / Entity Name: By: Name: (please print) Name: (please print) Date Signed: Date Signed: Office/Title of Signatory: State of Oregon ) County of Clackamas ) On this day of , , before me the undersigned Notary Public, personally appeared ❑ personally known to me ❑ proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence To be the person who executed the within instrument ❑ as on behalf of [name the entity] pursuant to authority, and acknowledged to me the execution hereof. WITNESS my hand and official seal Notary Seal Notary Signature Commission expires: 2 OWNER(S) / GRANTOR(S) (To be completed if the owner is different than the responsible party [Section A]) By signing below,the Responsible Party agrees and accepts the terms and conditions of this document. Failure to comply with this O&M Plan may result in a requirement to restore the facility to the original design and in fines and/or penalties. If Signatory is a Corporation / Entity: If Signatory is not a Corporation/ Entity: Corporation / Entity Name: By: Name: (please print) Name: (please print) Date Signed: Date Signed: Office/Title of Signatory: State of Oregon ) County of Clackamas ) On this day of , before me the undersigned Notary Public, personally appeared ❑ personally known to me ❑ proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence To be the person who executed the within instrument ❑ as or on behalf of (name of entity] pursuant to authority, and acknowledged to me the execution hereof. WITNESS my hand and official seal Notary Seal Notary Signature Commission expires: 3 Operations & Maintenance Requirement Building Permit#499- Land Use#(if applicable): LU- Facility Information Responsible Party: Site Address: Contact Name: Section/Township/Range: Contact Organization (if applicable): Tax Lot Number: Mailing Address: Facility Type and Drainage Type/Area (add more pages as necessary) Facility Type=raingarden,drywell,planter,etc. Drainage Type=roof,driveway,parking lot, pool,etc. 1. Facility Type: Drainage Type: Drainage Area (sq. ft.): 2. Facility Type: Drainage Type: Drainage Area (sq. ft.): 3. Facility Type: Drainage Type: Drainage Area (sq. ft.): The responsible party shall inspect and maintain stormwater facilities in accordance with the attached Operations and Maintenance(O&M) requirements. All repairs shall be completed promptly and in accordance with these requirements. If a change in property ownership or facility maintenance responsibility occurs,the responsible party shall transfer all maintenance records(up to 10 years)to the facility's new responsible party. Maintenance records shall be available to the City upon request. Revisions to this O&M Plan must be approved by the City prior to recording with County. The revised O&M plan must state that it is a revision and cite the County document number of the original O&M Plan. Revisions must be recorded in the County and a copy returned to the City. Required Attachments: 1)Approved Site Plan,2)O&M Requirements for each facility, and 3)Approved Detail Drawings for each facility 4 Appendix A-5 Sample Operations and Maintenance Plan LO SWMM 2020 Update SAMPLE OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENT Facility Name/ID #: Facility Type: Name(s) of Person Responsible for Maintenance: Facility Address: Site Map Provide the following: • Facility location and orientation • Maintenance access location • Flow direction • Designated inspection locations • North arrow • Scale Mark any photo monitoring points on site map or on the as-built/record drawing. Also attach design or record (as-built) drawings of facility that show the following (as applicable): ❑ Maintenance access ❑ Infiltration soils to be protected from compaction by heavy equipment ❑ Overflow location and configuration ❑ Inlet and outlet pipes, including size, material, and elevation ❑ Orifice size and elevation ❑ Other: Maintenance and Inspection Triggers Describe maintenance access for inspection by City staff (also indicate on site sketch or map): Summarize Maintenance and Inspection Schedule Frequency or Trigger Inspection or Maintenance to be Performed Provide Maintenance and Inspection Form specific to your facility. An example for a rain garden is attached. Sample Inspection Form Facility Name/ID #: Date of Inspection: Name(s) of Inspectors: Facility Address: Time since last rainfall (hours): Quantity of last rainfall (inches): Site Sketch (include inlets, outlets, north arrow, flow direction, etc.) Mark any photo monitoring points on site sketch or on the as-built/record drawing. Based on a visual assessment of the site, answer the following questions: Function: Soil Depth, Infiltration Capability, and Health Facility Footprint 1. Are there indications of any of the following in the vegetated facility? (If yes, mark on site sketch or as-built/record drawing) ❑ Erosion ❑ Settlement ❑ Compaction ❑ Seeps and wet spots ❑ Holes through berms ❑ Other: ❑ None Mulch 2. Are there any bare spots (without mulch cover) or locations with mulch depth less than 2 inches? ❑ Yes ❑ No If yes, mark on site sketch. Function: Water Movement Through the Facility Inlets/Outlets/Pipes 3. How many inlet structures are present? ❑ 0 ❑ 1 ❑ 2 ❑ 3 ❑ 4 ❑ 5 ❑ > 5 Are any of the inlet structures clogged? (If yes, mark the location on your site sketch and fill in the boxes below with the cause of the clogging (e.g., debris, sediment, vegetation, etc.) ❑ No ❑ Partially ❑ Completely ❑ Not Applicable 4. Are any of the inlet structures altered from the original design or otherwise in need of maintenance? (If yes, write in reason: frost heave, vandalism, unknown, etc.) Inlet #: Inlet #: Inlet #: Inlet #: Inlet #: Partially clogged Completely clogged Reason for maintenance 5. Are any trashracks, overflow or underdrains clogged? ❑ No ❑ Partially ❑ Completely ❑ Not Applicable a. If yes, mark the location on your site sketch and fill in the boxes below with the cause of the clogging (e.g., debris, sediment, vegetation, etc.) b. Are any of the overflow or bypass structures altered from the original design or otherwise in need of maintenance? (If yes, write in reason: frost heave, vandalism, unknown, etc.) Outlet #: Outlet #: Outlet #: Partially clogged Completely clogged Reason for maintenance i Pondine Area 6. Is there ponded water in the facility? ❑ Yes ❑ No If yes, how deep? If yes, describe the potential reasons for ponded water below (recent rainfall, non-functional underdrain, groundwater input, illicit pipe connection, inadequate capacity in facility [due to debris, sediment, or vegetation clogging, etc.]) Notes: Function: Vegetation Cover and Health Vegetation 7. What is the approximate vegetation survival rate? a. Is there the presence of? ❑ Diseased plants ❑ Weeds Species: ❑ Noxious weeds Species: ❑ Water stress? Other: b. Does the vegetation appear to be healthy? ❑ Yes ❑ No (If no, describe below) c. Is the vegetation the appropriate size and density? ❑ Yes ❑ No (If no, describe below) Notes: Watering 8. Does the irrigation system appear to be functioning as designed? ❑ Yes ❑ No ❑ Not applicable; no irrigation system present ❑ Can't tell 9. Is there any evidence of leaks, broken sprinkler heads, or damage to the irrigation system? ❑ Yes ❑ No ❑ Not applicable; no irrigation system present ❑ Can't tell If yes, mark on site sketch where repairs are needed. Other Pest Control 10. Is there any evidence of animal burrowing, animals causing damage to plants, animal feces, or other pest damage? ❑ Yes ❑ No If yes, please describe: Summary Inspector's maintenance recommendations and record of maintenance performed (check the appropriate boxed in the table below) Maintenance Needed 4J N (p c�C c O O C C N O L Z 1 Facility E3 Maintenance Performed Component — During Visit Notes Facility Footprint Mulch Inlets Outlets Pipes Vegetation Irrigation/ Watering Pest Control Other: Other: Additional Notes: Did you identify any major issues with the facility? If yes, contact the City's Stormwater Quality Coordinator. Estimated Time Spent at Facility: IN: OUT: TOTAL: LEAD INSPECTOR'S INITIALS: WWV / CONNECT PVC PIPE TO 6"___ TRENCH DRAIN,FIELD FIT , 4 _______________ _____ ___________________ EXISTING 4 _- ___ NOUT _7— BUILDING - - V /7//7/4"7 - ' 3"DIA PVC PIPE(TYP) Is FOOTPRINT ...‘4 .‘/, '' EXISTING TYPE 1 INLET -I.:._- . / - O 16 LF 4'DIA.PP UDP - Z---- -+ c'• 'Y/ //- / t•. • . •• •.. . .. . ., . . 1: _Z 1;ERMEABLE PAVER _/- _ _ r--..------- ---_____ / Z UNDERDRAIN PIPE - - 1 ...... .. . MAINTENANCE PLAN-INSPECTION POINTS 2 _ _ PVC DOWNSPOIJTADAPTER — — — — — — Q, DESCRIPTION OBSERVATION TRIGGER ACTION CRACK OR OTHER '----1IiHiHi 11111114 I 1 I 1111 VII •1 1 1 1 1 _ 02 TRENCH DRAIN OUTLET CHECK STRUCTURAL CONDITION,CLEAR DEBRIS DEFICIENCY REPAIR OR REPLACE - - --PERMEABLE c._ - - PAVERS - - - - , _ III lip_ R„,... 1 11-n.ii cll . . 0 OVERFLOW CHECK THAT WATER CAN OBSERVED DAMAGE; REPAIR OR REPLACE ,"THICK STREAMBED DRAIN FREELY WATER NOT DRAINING 6. 11, _.•OBBLES AT TRENCH- 1 p Ai CHANNELS OR CUTS 2 FILL AND REPAIR(SEE • , DRAIN OUTLET A • 0 P 7;1 II 111111111r ® BIORETENTION SOIL SURFACE CONDITION INCHES WIDE CHECKLIST) o. BARK MULCH - - - .,., m • - - All - - - - - :..a.‘.:::., I 0 VEGETATION CONDITION,DENSITY LESS THAN 90%COVER WITH VEGETATION SEE CHECKLIST -- 7 IITP a 7 7 7 7 -Hrlit; .4 -1'....••, -.' , ao, ,,,,,,,,400,42,, • , ,* — "Zee• • • •• • ''' •• ' 141- , -,-... .40 z/ Z 41 / (...) MULCH DEPTH,CONDITION INADEQUATE COVERAGE REPLACgHAESZEsIT3ED;SEE I-- ...re / .S. / zo, — — — tek. ,' ,w:,.- OVERFLOW-12"DIA NVLOPLAST ''',.. - - 1071 • \__, ' A /, ar / Ar 92812AG DRAIN BASIN AND - - - — DOME GRATE V •a7. / _ — c),,R0E;TE-rg,N)son_ ',4, ., ''..Z.e.... AV - _„_...,Z ---— — -.41440/1114106/0W,;.-i. l'.. -140''' DOWNSPOUT PIPE RAIN GAPJ3EN ®BOTTOM / EXISTING DOWNSPOUT i l',,' t ,///- 103 TRENCH DRAIN Li, p? LI cin g en 3"DESIGN PONDING DEPTH . o g d d 103 102 2 d i BARK MULCH(3.DEPTH)® d 1,7 1,7 102 UNDERDRAIN PIPE it''cl 4.STREAMBED EXISTING GRADE COBBLES Iftb ir4 ,o,,o, -- '—• Vr,"-i,.--1*--11- --/--- — DESIGN PONDED K'%Ai', v,v•..:'W killnIMAill4k, o , 114114WWW1114.11''.*40 "'Of'W'vk#'*e' , E PLAN-RAIN GARDEN 1 i 03 99 i STREAMBEDDEPTH) \4/\' 'SiS'‘44 eelISt.eV,,./, .',CA4.' 1 '' •, 99 .1 SCALE 1,3' n ej (8. /).'- / tOZ.Z.0:11.;6"Zielizez1 3(MIN) • 3 ' lj COBBLES 98 _1 , 97 97 MINERAL AGGREGATE TYPE 26(16"DEPTH) NOTES: A •c.., i _ UNDERDRAIN PIPE ___ ,,, 98 o 96 9 22 w pnce i 1 SEE MAINTENANCE CHECKLISTS(APPENDIX H)FOR INSPECTION U ; (TYP) g -92Mi REQUIREMENTS AND CORRECTIVE ACTIONS 95 2 g 2. 95 PROFILE-RAIN GARDEN C HORIZONTAL SCALE IN FEET g L! i 1 0 HORIZ SCALE 1,3' , t VERT.SCALE 1,1 5' 8 1.5 0 IS 3 VERTICAL SCALE IN FEET i VERTICAL EXAGGERATION 2 I! 6. 6k. r--- — LAKE OSWEGO STORMWATER 1 il OA E MARCH 2014 Slal4 I DESIGNED- LIFMWX Z, I I MANAGEMENT MANUAL r-7.04931000 alEcKED I EXAMPLE O&M PLAN-RAIN GARDEN C-6 'A ,,. REVBION " AP" 'ATE 1 HERRERA 1 7.$NOIED Apppon,E, RAIN GARDEN B PLAN AND PROFILE rET" 0 2 12 / -/ vvTvvvvvvvv 1 6 PUG \\\\\�:'.`l\\\\ I\ 0 // 1'''l\ \\\\\\\\ I EXISTING \ \\\\\\\\\ C TYPE 1 INLET '/+��`\�X\X\X\T\ I LU s MAINTENANCE PLAN-INSPECTION POINTS 0 / ,..„,,, \\\\4\\\\\ Po, O ./� , POINT DESCRIPTION OBSERVATION TRIGGER ACTION 1 SEDIMENT DEPTH ON TOP CONDUCT VISUAL SEDIMENT DEPTH CARTRIDGE REPLACEMENT == 4 • (1CCA O OF CARTRIDGES INSPECTION EXCEEDS}" AND SE,IQUIREDMOVAL --------- ------L-_-'-- p_uy CONDUCT VISUAL SEDIMENT REMOVAL AND ^_ -L----�- -- 1 L SEDIMENT DEPTH ON INSPECTION(NO ENTRY SEDIMENT DEPTH CARTRIDGE REPIACEMEM \ / �_• O2 STRUCTURE FLOOR EXCEED54" MEDIA FILTER MANHOLE REQUIRED) REQUIRED SEE DETAILA CONDUCT VISUAL GREATER THAN 4"OF OSTANDING WATER IN OBSERVATION(NO ENTRY STANDING WATER IN INSPECT OUTLET STRUCTURE REQUIRED) STRUCTURE AFTER 24 STRUCTURE _____-- m I HOURS AFTER A STORM ----------_ ;m L ITyLID 1 r - ® REPLACE CARTRIDGES MEDIA FILTER DESIGN REPLACEMENT ACCORDING TO DESIGN CARTRIDGES INTERVAL IS#YEARS 4110 I MAINTENANCE INTERVAL — 00) V 1 RIM EL.813.00 PLAN-MEDIA FILTER THIS PLAN IS AN EXAMPLE ONLY-~l' O OWNER/OPERATOR OF FACILITY SCALE 1^=a' C3 MEDIA O SHALL DEVELOP MAINTENANCE AND FILTER CARTRIDGE INSPECTION PLAN FOR INDIVIDUAL -°' I —©© CARTRIDGE SEALED OUTLET FACIILTY. RISER 3 HDPE OUTLET INLET PIPE • P 80 E1_609 62 ° ; NOTES: 1. CARTRIDGE REPLACEMENT INTERVAL DEPENDS ON FLOWS AND _ EL 6065/ SEDIMENT LOADS AND SHALL BE DETERMINED ON A o y PROJECT-SPECIFIC BASIS 2. TRAFFIC CONTROL AND CONFINED SPACE ENTRY SHALL BE IN z �_£ ACCORDANCE WITH ALL APPLICABLE REGULATIONS AND AS g `m ELEVATION-MEDIA FILTER Oq NEEDED TO PROTECT MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL DEPENDING ON ACTIVITIES PERFORMED - - HORIZ SCALE:N.TS w a £ VERT.SCALE:N.T S y c66 I1 4 I p� o LAKE OSWEGO STORMWATERIwfE MARCH2O14 s§ I �° «� MANAGEMENT MANUAL 1°"°"`1aO4DU0006 8 I �e� EXAMPLE O&M PLAN A-2 a No RE6�N APpD �T HERRERA 1= NOTE. ° PROPRIETARY FACILITY �' °X2 2 A-5.9 Appendix A-6 Stormwater Certification Form LO SWMM 2020 Update Cityof Lake Oswego Q Building Permit Number: 0i Stormwater Facility Certification Land Use Number R (if applicable) Date: Site Address: Stormwater Report dated: (with all revisions) Construction Plans dated: (with all revisions) Stormwater Facilities on Site: I, , inspected the construction and installation of the above (Type/Print Name) stormwater facilities. I certify that: 1) The stormwater facilities meet the discharge requirements and specifications of the approved Stormwater Report and Construction Plans. 2) The construction of the stormwater facilities adhere to the requirements of the construction plans approved by the City of Lake Oswego on , 20_ Signature Title/Certification Professional Stamp with Signature Appendix B Infiltration Testing Guidance Infiltration Testing Report — B-1 Infiltration Testing Guidance — B-2 Infiltration testing during the summer may be unreliable due to large groundwater fluctuations in the city and perched groundwater in the winter. Using summer infiltration rates may result in problems with construction or maintenance later due to high groundwater tables LO SWMM 2020 Update Appendix B-1 Infiltration Testing Report Source: City of Portland, Bureau of Environmental Services LO SWMM 2020 Update Infiltration Testing Report Note—adapted from Portland Stormwater Management Manual (Portland 2008). Include the following information in the Infiltration Testing Report. The Infiltration Testing Report should be attached to the project's Design Report: 1. Statement of project understanding (proposed stormwater system) 2. Summary of subsurface conditions encountered 3. Summary of infiltration testing including location and number of tests and testing method used. Dis- cussion of how the tests were performed (i.e. pipe type or diameter or test pit dimensions) 4. Infiltration testing results in inches per hour 5. Recommended design infiltration rate 6. Groundwater observations within exploration and an estimate of the depth to seasonal high ground- water 7. Site plan showing location of infiltration tests 8. Boring or test pit logs. The logs should include an associated soil classification consistent with ASTM D2488-00, Standard Practice for Classification for Description and Identification of Soils (Visual- Manual Procedure). The logs should also include any additional pertinent subsurface information, such as soil moisture conditions, depth and description of undocumented or engineered fill, soil color and mottling conditions, soil stiffness or density, and approximate depth of contact between soil types. 9. Infiltration Test Data Tables (see following pages for example and blank tables) Lot number and Location Dimension of hole: Test Hold Location and Number Test method Proposed BMP Date Depth to bottom of hole: Tester's name, company, and phone number Depth (feet) Soil Texture Notes Pre-saturation start time Pre-saturation end time Time Time interval (minutes) Drop in water level Notes (feet) Appendix B-2 Infiltration Testing Guidance Source: City of Seattle Modified Procedure for Conducing Pilot Infiltration Test, 2009b LO SWMM 2020 Update Appendix E - City of Seattle Modified Procedure for Conducting a Pilot Infiltration Test The Pilot Infiltration Test (PIT) consists of a relatively large-scale infiltration test to better measure infiltration rates for design of stormwater infiltration facilities. The PIT reduces some of the scale errors associated with relatively small-scale double ring infiltrometer or"stove-pipe" infiltration tests. It is not a standard test but rather a practical field procedure based on the methods recommended by Ecology's Technical Advisory Committee. Correction factors must be applied to the infiltration rate measured using PIT to establish a design infiltration rate for BMP sizing. For infiltration basins, there shall be one test pit per 5,000 square feet of basin infiltrating surface with a minimum of two per basin, regardless of basin size. For bioretention facilities and permeable pavement facilities, there shall be one test pit per 5,000 square feet of contributing area. For infiltration trenches, there shall be one test pit per 50 feet of trench length. For drywells, there shall be at least one test pit per well. Prepare detailed logs for each test pit and a map showing the location of the test pits. Logs must include the depth, depth to water, evidence of seasonal high groundwater elevation, existing ground surface elevation, proposed facility bottom elevation, and presence of stratification that may impact the infiltration design. PIT test reports shall be stamped by a Professional Engineer or prepared by an on-site wastewater treatment designer licensed with the State of Washington. E.1 Infiltration Test • Excavate the test pit to the depth of the bottom of the proposed infiltration facility. Lay back the slopes sufficiently to avoid caving and erosion during the test. • The size of the bottom of the test pit should be as close to the size of the planned infiltration facility as possible, but not less than 2 feet by 2 feet. Where water availability is a problem, smaller areas may be considered as determined by the site professional. • Accurately document the size and geometry of the test pit. • Install a device capable of measuring the water level in the pit during the test. This may be a pressure transducer (automatic measurements) or a vertical measuring rod (minimum 5 feet long) marked in half-inch increments in the center of the pit bottom (manual measurements). • Use a rigid 6-inch-diameter pipe with a splash plate or some other device on the bottom of the pit to reduce side-wall erosion and excessive disturbance of the pit bottom. Excessive erosion and disturbance may result in clogging and yield lower than actual infiltration rates. • Add water to the pit at a rate that will maintain a water level between 3 and 4 feet above the bottom of the pit. Note: A water level of 3 to 4 feet provides for easier measurement and flow stabilization control. However, the depth should not exceed the proposed maximum depth of water expected in the completed facility. Every 15 to 30 minutes, record the cumulative volume and instantaneous flow rate in gallons per minute necessary to maintain the water level at the same point (between 3 and 4 feet) on the measuring rod. This can best be accomplished with an in-flow meter. It can also be accomplished by timing how long it takes to fill a known volume such as a 5 gallon bucket. Add water to the pit until 1 hour after the flow rate into the pit has stabilized (constant flow rate) while maintaining the same pond water level (usually 17 hours). After the flow rate has stabilized, turn off the water and record the rate of infiltration in inches per hour using the pressure transducer or measuring rod, until the pit is empty. E.2 Data Analysis Calculate and record the infiltration rate in inches per hour until 1 hour after the flow has stabilized. Note: Use statistical/trend analysis to obtain the hourly flow rate when the flow stabilizes. This would be the lowest hourly flow rate. E.3 Apply Correction Factor The infiltration rate obtained from the PIT test shall be considered to be a short- term rate. This "short-term" rate must be reduced through correction factors to account for site variability and number of tests conducted, degree of long-term maintenance and influent pretreatment/control, and potential for long-term clogging due to siltation and bio-buildup. The corrected infiltration rate is considered the "long-term" or "design" infiltration rate and is used for all BMP sizing calculations. One exception to the requirement for a correction factor applies to bioretention facilities. Specifically, when imported bioretention soil is used, no correction factor is required for the infiltration rate of the underlying native soil. A minimum infiltration rate correction factor of 2.0 is required for all facilities designed using the PIT method. Correction factors greater than 2.0 should be considered for situations where long-term maintenance will be difficult to implement, where little or no pretreatment is anticipated, or where site conditions are highly variable or uncertain. These situations require the use of best professional judgment by the site engineer and the approval by the City of Seattle. The typical range of correction factors to account for these issues, based on Ecology's guidance, is summarized in Table E-1. In no case shall the design infiltration rate exceed 10 inches per hour. Table E-1. Correction Factors to be Used With In-Situ Infiltration Measurements to Estimate Long-Term Design Infiltration Rates. Partial Correction Issue Factor Site variability and number of locations tested CFv= 1.5 to 6 Degree of long-term maintenance to prevent siltation and bio-buildup CFm = 2 to 6 Degree of influent control to prevent siltation and bio-buildup CFi = 2 to 6 Total Correction Factor(CF)=CFv+CFm+CFi The following discussions are to provide assistance in determining the partial correction factors that may apply. Site variability and number of locations tested —The number of locations tested must be capable of producing a picture of the subsurface conditions that fully represents the conditions throughout the facility site. The partial correction factor used for this issue depends on the level of uncertainty that adverse subsurface conditions may occur. If the range of uncertainty is low—for example, conditions are known to be uniform through previous exploration and site geological factors—one pilot infiltration test may be adequate to justify a partial correction factor at the low end of the range. If the level of uncertainty is high, a partial correction factor near the high end of the range may be appropriate. This might be the case where the site conditions are highly variable due to a deposit of ancient landslide debris, or buried stream channels. In these cases, even with many explorations and several pilot infiltration tests, the level of uncertainty may still be high. A partial correction factor near the high end of the range could be assigned where conditions have a more typical variability, but few explorations and only one pilot infiltration test is conducted. That is, the number of explorations and tests conducted do not match the degree of site variability anticipated. Degree of long-term maintenance to prevent siltation and bio-buildup—The standard of comparison here is the long-term maintenance requirements provided in Appendix J with these requirements would be justification to use a partial correction factor at the low end of the range. If there is a high degree of uncertainty that long-term maintenance will be carried out consistently, or if the Volume 3—Flow Control and Water Quality Treatment Technical Requirements Manual Appendix E maintenance plan is poorly defined, a partial correction factor near the high end of the range may be justified. Degree of influent control to prevent siltation and bio-buildup—A partial correction factor near the high end of the range may be justified under the following circumstances: • If the infiltration facility is located in a shady area where moss buildup or litter fall buildup from the surrounding vegetation is likely and cannot be easily controlled through long-term maintenance • If there is minimal pre-treatment, and the influent is likely to contain moderately high TSS levels. If influent into the facility can be well controlled such that the planned long-term maintenance can easily control siltation and biomass buildup, then a partial correction factor near the low end of the range may be justified. The determination of long-term design infiltration rates from in-situ infiltration test data involves a considerable amount of engineering judgment. Therefore, when reviewing or determining the final long-term design infiltration rate, the local jurisdictional authority should consider the results of both textural analyses and in-situ infiltration tests results when available. Example: The area of the bottom of the test pit is 8.5 feet by 11.5 feet. Water flow rate was measured and recorded at intervals ranging from 15 to 30 minutes throughout the test. Between 400 minutes and 1,000 minutes, the flow rate stabilized between 10 and 12.5 gallons per minute or 600 to 750 gallons per hour, or an average of(9.8 + 12.3) / 2 = 11.1 inches per hour. Applying at least the minimum correction factor of 2.0 (example only) the design long-term infiltration rate becomes 5.6 inches per hour, anticipating adequate maintenance and pre-treatment. Appendix C Reading the Soil Source: Kitsap County Stormwater Retrofit Design Guidance, 2012 LO SWMM 2020 Update Reading the Soil Complex chemical interactions occur within soil when it comes in contact with water and air. The color and characteristics of a soil can provide general information about how long it has been saturated or inundated. This portion of the manual is a guide to recognizing these soil characteristics, but a soil and/or wetland professional should be contacted to verify what has been observed and to obtain more information. ' '} ; . '^ Kedoximorphic Features :•�•-e f ' ~,it. .oils with dark backgrounds and rusty and/or yellow splotches could indicate '' j •. soils were saturated for a temporary period of time (2 weeks or a month) and r, '' then dried out allowing air to enter the soil pores. The rust and yellow splotches .re referred to as redoximorphic features. These features indicate that iron has -: };" ; `,- -' .r.), •one into solution and then been exposed to air; oxidizing the iron and creating r , r ust colors in the soil. If you observe soils with these characteristics, contact a soil • .r wetland professional to get more information. rf 4 r- Depleted Soils Soils that have a light grey background can be what is referred to as "depleted 2,,- soils." Depleted soils often also contain redoximorphic features (rust and yellow + •y r ~'. i, , splotches). Soils exhibiting these characteristics are likely to have been saturated .j. ' ' `::-#; _. _� rr for a longer period (up to several months) than the soils shown in Photo 11. Much � _ of the iron in these soils has been leached out and down the soil column during the I_ ^ =i time theyare saturated. When soils dryout, air enters the soil's pores and creates -- - `x'' , --= redoximorphic features (rusty/yellow splotches). Soils with this characteristic may ;_h_ indicate shallowgroundwater ispresent and affectingdrainage of the stormwater 9 �_- .•_ facility. ' " . C� ;i I uleyed Soils •'is, ,. f ;. . :,.� x* -+` : ',' ;� Soils that are saturated or inundated all year round typically have light grey-greenish or bluish colors. Nearly all of the iron and manga- f t , .- > •• ry'. nese in these soils have been leached down the soil column leaving x�r ' ' �'•'°' " "' the light grey-greenish, bluish color, indicating permanent or long -' = A fi �',.`rs} , ' term saturation. Soils that have this characteristic could indicate that f, '- shallow groundwater is present and may affect the drainage of the -: -, �: stormwater facility. Saturated Soils • •' ;Y r Soils are saturated when 100 percent of the soil pores are filled with water. It can be difficult to determine whether soils are saturated just by ' looking at them. Once a hole is excavated, soils may be seen glistening _ or water may be pouring out of the side of the hole. This is an indication :'- • . , . %'; ""' that soils are saturated, but closer observation of the soils is best. If you '1 .y -1 ^R can squeeze water out of the soil easily, it is likelysaturated even if you T' , ,- / do not see water pouring out of the side of the hole. Contact a soils or wetland scientist to assist with verification of soil saturation. .A. ±' 4 - Shallow Water Table • ,,;; _ 4 A shallow groundwater table maybe present beneath a stormwater pond, at least { ` '.'.' for part of the year. It is important to recognize that the water levels can rise with ,,'- rainwater from winter storms, adversely affecting drainage of the stormwater facil- . =_,T :,,t.: •`> - ity. Shallow water tables are typically in low elevation areas near streams or other L4 .11 water bodies. The presence of shallow groundwater can be determined during u7 ;2=,-i the dry season (May through September in western Washington) when the storm- water pond is not receiving much inflow. While the surface of the stormwater facility may be dry, the water table may be just below the surface. Excavate soils to a depth of at least 24 inches to determine if shallow groundwater is present. A ] ti Leave the soil pit open for at least 30 minutes or an hour to allow the water (if present) to fill up part of the hole, especially if soils are fine-textured such as clay and silt that transmit water slowly. If shallow groundwater fills the soil pit during this test, dig another soil pit elsewhere in the pond bottom, and allow time for wa- ter to fill it in. If pooled water is observed in one or more test pits, it is likely that a shallow water table is present at a similar elevation beneath the entire pond. Well-drained Soils ems£` r: ' '. %�".:=r�. =."�* Soils mayalso be drybelow the surface indicatingtheyare well-drained. ir --" ;, ` -` '�` ''"`' . Excavate a soil pit to at least 24 inches to determine whether soils are ,r, r: well-drained. Soils that are light or bright in color and that do not have re- _ , r r doximorphic features also indicate well-drained soils. Well-drained soils .ee.S.', ' ,- ;f` _,ti are typically coarse-textured such as sandy soils, unless there is a high ,,,*;!-I,., '':'0! water table that keeps soils saturated near the soil surface. Soils that are ' '•, ;__� i . well drained should be dry during most of the year except within a couple ,- "- . ', _ ` .•'_` • days after a rainstorm has occurred. Well-drained soils typically infiltrate rainwater within a short period of time (no longer than a week). Appendix D Biofiltration Soil Mix Specifications Source: City of Portland Stormwater Management Manual, 2019 LO SWMM 2020 Update BLENDED SOIL SPECIFICATION FOR VEGETATED STORMWATER SYSTEMS The following specification is taken from the 2010 City of Portland Standard Construction Specifications (SCS), as amended or corrected, and is applicable to the requirements in the Stormwater Management Manual. Facilities include swales, planters, curb extensions, and basins. 01040.14(d) Stormwater Facility Blended Soil* *NOTE: This specification is required for all public facilities. Private facilities must use blended topsoil that meets the General Composition requirements of 01040.14 (d) (1). Testing and submittals are not required for private facilities unless they are requested by the Bureau permitting the work. 01040.14 Topsoil - Furnish topsoil containing no substance detrimental to the growth of plants and that is free of Noxious Weeds and Nuisance Plants. Unsuitable topsoil, or topsoil placed without approval in areas to be planted, may be required to be replaced at no additional cost to the City. (d) Stormwater Facility Blended Soil — Following the general provisions for topsoil, and incorporating the following requirements, furnish imported blended soil for all vegetated stormwater facilities conforming to the following: (1) General Composition - Use a blended material incorporating loamy soil, sand, and compost that is 30-40% compost by volume and meets the other criteria in this specification. The loamy soil must be subsoil taken from at least one foot below grade to reduce the potential for contaminants such as weed seeds. (2) Analysis Requirements for the Blended Material: a. Particle Gradation - A sieve analysis of the blended sand and soil, not including compost, shall be conducted in conformance with ASTM C117/C136, AASHTO T11/T27, ASTM D7928/D1140, or ASTM D6913. The analysis shall include the following sieve sizes: 1 inch, 3/8 inch, #4, #10, #20, #40, #60, #100, #200. The gradation of the blend shall meet the following gradation criteria. Sieve Size Percent Passing 1 inch 100 #4 85 -100 # 10 50-100 #40 20-60 # 100 10-40 # 200 10-20 b. Acidity- The pH (Power of Hydrogen) of the blended material shall be tested and be between 6 to 8. Source: City of Portland, SCS Special Provision (3) General Requirements for the Blended Material: a. The material shall be loose and easily broken into small pieces b. It shall be well mixed and homogenous. c. It shall be free of wood pieces, plastic, and other foreign matter. d. It shall have no visible free water. (4) Compost - The compost shall be derived from plant material and provided by a member of the US Composting Council Seal of Testing Assurance (STA) program. See www.compostingcouncil.orq for a list of local providers. The compost shall be the result of the biological degradation and transformation of plant- derived materials under conditions designed to promote aerobic decomposition. The material shall be well composted, free of viable weed seeds, and stable with regard to oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide generation. The compost shall have no visible free water and produce no dust when handled. It shall meet the following criteria, as reported by the US Composting Council STA Compost Technical Data Sheet provided by the vendor. • 100% of the material must pass through a 1/2-inch screen. • The pH of the material shall be between 6 min. and 8.5 max. • Manufactured inert material (plastic, concrete, ceramics, metal, etc.)shall be less than 1.0% by weight. • The organic matter content shall be between 30 and 70% (dry weight basis). • Soluble salt content shall be less than 6.0 mmhos/cm. • Maturity Indicator shall be greater than 80% for Germination and Vigor. • Stability shall be `Stable' to 'Very Stable'. • Carbon/Nitrogen (C/N) ratio shall be less than 25:1. • Trace metals test result = "Pass." (5) Submittals -At least 14 working days in advance of construction, submit the following: a. Documentation for the two analyses described in section 01040.14(d)(2) of this specification (particle gradation and pH) shall be performed by an accredited laboratory with current certification. The date of the analyses shall be no more than 90 calendar days prior to the date of the submittal. Include the following information in the report: Source: City of Portland, SCS Special Provision • Name and address of the laboratory. • Phone contact and e-mail address for the laboratory. • Test data, including the date and name of the test procedure. b. For the compost component of the blended soil, a compost technical data sheet from the vendor. The analysis and report must conform to the sampling and reporting requirements of the US Composting Council Seal of Testing Assurance (STA) program. The analysis shall be performed and reported by an approved independent STA program laboratory and be no more than 90 calendar days prior to the date of the submittal. c. Up to two 5-gallon buckets of the blended material, as requested. d. The location/name of the of the source of the loamy soil. (6) Stormwater Facility Blended Soil Installation - See 01040.43(e). Construction 01040.43(e) Stormwater Facility Blended Soil: (1) Protection of the Soil -The material shall be protected from all sources of contamination, including weed seeds, while at the supplier, in conveyance, and at the project site. (2) Wet and Winter Conditions - Hauling and placement of the material will not be allowed when the weather is too wet or the ground is frozen or saturated as determined by the Owner's Representative. (3) Placement of the Soil — Place the material in loose lifts, not to exceed 8 inches each and each lift shall be compacted with a water-filled landscape roller. Do not otherwise mechanically compact the material. (4) Timing of Plant Installation -Weather permitting and as approved, install plants as soon as possible after placing and grading the soil to minimize erosion and compaction. (5) Erosion Control - Temporary erosion control measures are required until permanent stabilization measures are functional. (6) Protection of the Installed Soil - In all cases, protect the installed material from foot or equipment traffic and surface water runoff. Install temporary fencing or walkways as needed to keep workers, pedestrians, and equipment out of the area. Under no circumstances should materials and equipment be stored on top of the installation area. Source: City of Portland, SCS Special Provision Appendix E Rational Method Specifications Source: City of Lake Oswego Surface Water Design Workbook, 2003 LO SWMM 2020 Update CHART 1 STANDARD EQUATIONS SEWER CURVE RADIUS : (Deflected Straight Pipe) All units are in feet. R = DL/G = Radius for a given diameter,laying length and gap R1)4 = 48 DL = Radius that will produce a 1/4' (0.02083') gap G = ❑L/R = Gap that will be produced for a given radius, laying length and diameter D Outside diameter of the pipe barrel at the joint (spigot) L Laying length of one section of pipe G Joint gap or opening at the outside edge of the pipe barrel when the pipe is in the deflected position R Radius of the curve on the pipe centerline MANNING'S EQUATION: ( Open Channel Flow ) Q _ 1.486 AR2r3 stiz 4 _ 0.453 Dar3 5,r2 Manning's Eq.for circular pipe flowing full n V _ 1.486 R2J3 5 tR v _ 0,590 D2/3 S1(2 O Quantity of flow,cubic feet per second ✓ Velocity of flow,feet per second n Manning's coefficient of roughness (see CHART 7) A Cross-sectional area, square feet R Hydraulic radius( area of flow divided by wetted perimeter), feet S Slope of the pipe or energy line,feet per foot D Diameter of pipe,feet RATIONAL METHOD: ( Stormwater Design Flows ) O = CIA ( Max. drainage area= 100 acres---Max.time =60 minutes) Q Quantity of runoff,cubic feet per second C Coefficient of runoff (ratio of runoff to rainfall ), percent I Intensity of rainfall, inches per hour A Area of tributary drainage basin, acres GUTTER FLOW CAPACITY: ( Manning's Equation Modified) 0 = 0.56 t/Sx -5 2 67 �. t.67 �.5 T2.fi7 v _ 1.12 S4.5 %°,67 T0.67 —s or ❑ = s. Ct Quantity of flow, cubic feet per second Sx Street cross slope,feet per foot S Street longitudinal slope,feet per foot n Manning's coefficient of roughness for the gutter, ( normally 0.018 ) d Depth of flow at the curb, feet T Total width at flow in the gutter, Feet TIME OF CONCENTRATION: (Overland Stormwater Flow) T = L/60V ( for conversion of velocity to travel lime) Tc = Tn *Tr2+ Tim T� = 0.42 (nL)c a ( Manning's kinematic solution for sheet flow less than 300 feet ) 1.58 {S )°4 V = 16,1345(S)°5 ( Unpaved surfaces) (Shallow concentrated flow for slopes less than 0.005 ft/ft- V =20.3282 (S)0-5 {Paved surfaces ) } For steeper slopes see CHART 9) T, Travel time, minutes L Flow length.feet ✓ Average velocity of flow,feet per second 80 Conversion factor from seconds to minutes TT Total time of concentration,minutes { minimum-Cc =5,0 minutes) n Manning's roughness coefficient for various surfaces, (see CHART 10) S Slope of the hydraulic grade line (land or watercourse slope ),feet per foot 1.58 A factor derived from Ref. No.B ( P2 from 2 year, 24 hour precipitation chart, for the Portland,Oregon area [P2°' = 2.5'15 = 1.58 j) BES August 7, 1990 CHART 1 CHART 8 MANNING'S n VALUES SURFACE DESCRIPTION DESIGN SURFACE DESCRIPTION DESIGN VALUE VALUE Sheet Flow' ( Max.300') - Paved Streets& Gutters Concrete or asphalt .011 Concrete gutter,trowel finish .012 Bare sand .010 Asphalt pavement Graveled surface .020 Smooth texture .013 Bare clay- loam ( eroded) ,020 Rough texture .018 Grass (short grass prairie ) 2 .15 Conc. gutter w/asph. payment - (dense grass -lawn ) , .24 Smooth .013 • (bermuda grass ) - .41 Rough ,015 Woods 3 (light underbrush ) .40 Concrete pavement • (dense - ) .80 Float finish .014 - Notes: 'The sheet flow n values are from Ref. No. 7, Page 3-3 Broom finish 016 and include Information compiled by Engman ( 1986 ). For gutters with a small slope, where sediment may accumulate, Ref.No. 6, 2 These n values are for sheet flow only and are not increase n by 002 appropriate for channel flow. Note: From Ref. No. 9. 3 When selecting n for wooded areas, consider cover to a height of about 0.1 ft.This is the only part of the plant Sewers cover that will obstruct sheet flow. Concrete sewer pipe .013 PVC( polyvinyichioride) ..013 Open Channel ( natural ) 1 HDPE(high density polyethylene) .013 Clean, straight,full stage, no pools .029 1 - As above with weeds and stones .035- Culverts Winding, pools &shallows,clean .039 Concrete sewer pipe .013 As above at low stages .047 Concrete box culvert .013 Winding, pools& shallows, weeds&stones .042 HDPE (high density polyethylene) .013 As above, shallow stages,large stones .052 Sluggish, weedy, with deep pools .065 Very weedy and sluggish .112 • Note: The open channel(natural) n values are from Linsley, Kohler, Paulhus ( 1982), Ref. No. 16. 1 Open Channel ( Artificial Changes) Depth, feet 0.0 -0.5 0.5-2.0 > 2.0 Concrete ( broom or float finish ) .015 .013 .013 Gunite .022 .020 .020 Grouted riprap .040 .030 .028 Stone masonry .042 .032 .030 Soil cement .025 .022 .020 Asphalt .018 .016 .016 Bare soil .023 .020 .020 Rock cut .045 .035 .025 Gravel, 1 inch, Dso .044 .033 .030 • 2 inch, 175o ,066 .041 .034 Rock riprap, 6 inch, D o .104 .069 .035 • • 12 Inch, D50 NA .078 .040 Note: From Ref. No. 15, Page 37. BES August 7, 1990 . CHART 8 CHART 8 MANNING'S n VALUES SURFACE DESCRIPTION DESIGN SURFACE DESCRIPTION DESIGN VALUE VALUE Sheet Flow' ( Max.300') - Paved Streets& Gutters Concrete or asphalt .011 Concrete gutter,trowel finish .012 Bare sand .010 Asphalt pavement Graveled surface .020 Smooth texture .013 Bare clay- loam ( eroded) ,020 Rough texture .018 Grass (short grass prairie ) 2 .15 Conc. gutter w/asph. payment - (dense grass -lawn ) , .24 Smooth .013 • (bermuda grass ) - .41 Rough ,015 Woods 3 (light underbrush ) .40 Concrete pavement • (dense - ) .80 Float finish .014 - Notes: 'The sheet flow n values are from Ref. No. 7, Page 3-3 Broom finish 016 and include Information compiled by Engman ( 1986 ). For gutters with a small slope, where sediment may accumulate, Ref.No. 6, 2 These n values are for sheet flow only and are not increase n by 002 appropriate for channel flow. Note: From Ref. No. 9. 3 When selecting n for wooded areas, consider cover to a height of about 0.1 ft.This is the only part of the plant Sewers cover that will obstruct sheet flow. Concrete sewer pipe .013 PVC( polyvinyichioride) ..013 Open Channel ( natural ) 1 HDPE(high density polyethylene) .013 Clean, straight,full stage, no pools .029 1 - As above with weeds and stones .035- Culverts Winding, pools &shallows,clean .039 Concrete sewer pipe .013 As above at low stages .047 Concrete box culvert .013 Winding, pools& shallows, weeds&stones .042 HDPE (high density polyethylene) .013 As above, shallow stages,large stones .052 Sluggish, weedy, with deep pools .065 Very weedy and sluggish .112 • Note: The open channel(natural) n values are from Linsley, Kohler, Paulhus ( 1982), Ref. No. 16. 1 Open Channel ( Artificial Changes) Depth, feet 0.0 -0.5 0.5-2.0 > 2.0 Concrete ( broom or float finish ) .015 .013 .013 Gunite .022 .020 .020 Grouted riprap .040 .030 .028 Stone masonry .042 .032 .030 Soil cement .025 .022 .020 Asphalt .018 .016 .016 Bare soil .023 .020 .020 Rock cut .045 .035 .025 Gravel, 1 inch, Dso .044 .033 .030 • 2 inch, 175o ,066 .041 .034 Rock riprap, 6 inch, D o .104 .069 .035 • • 12 Inch, D50 NA .078 .040 Note: From Ref. No. 15, Page 37. BES August 7, 1990 . CHART 8 CHART 9 AVERAGE VELOCITIES FOR SHALLOW CONCENTRATED FLOW Average Velocity, Feet Per Second 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 910 20 .50 - � i .50 rr40 HINHIIIIIIIIII . ; .40 .3011111111111.1 ��� L2° 1 El .20 2p I ll 1 g .10 . ur.....•EME=W Mr.ENIall I 10 g LA- I .07 i111111111GIJIKIIIIII111 .07 14 .06 I l .06 ti 111111' ▪ .0� 05o • U) i CI7 ■ , E. .04 ,41 1 .a4 5 O ��■ —.. 0 d -03 .�.e 45 ,� IIIIII I 7 .03 0, a, SITQ� .: III/ I' ill I .02 MEW •S'iFAI'.4,9 .02 II��AL.414 I 1 I WAIN I111I1111111111 ►AN11 IIIIIIIIl111111 ■ IN / AIU1 1W11111111101 I .01 .01 II1111111I1111w■I1II I IA .IImIIIIHIuI ■ /' I I ! 1 .005 I - H . .005 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 910 20 Average Velocity, Feet Per Second * For slopes less than 0.005 ft/ft, use the following equations: V = 16.1345 ( S)° =fps ( Unpaved surfaces) V = 20.3282 ( S}a's =fps ( Paved surfaces) From Ref. No.7, Fig. 3-1, Page 3-2& Appendix F, Page F-1 BES August 7, 1990 CHART 9 CHART 10 RUNOFF COEFFICIENTS * % SOIL" DRAINAGE AREA SLOPE TYPICAL LAND USE*" ti IMPERVIOUS TYPE Under 5% 5%to 10% Over 10% m d A 0.19 0.24 0.29 Zones: OS, RF ~ 0 to 10 B 0.28 0.33 0.38 Other: Parks, Cemeteries& Playgrounds C 0.33 0.43 0.52 A 0.26 0.31 0.36 Zones: R20 10 to 20 B 0.35 0.40 0.45 C 0.39 0.48 0.57 A 0.34 0.39 0.44 Zones: R10 20 to 30 B 0.41 0.46 0.51 C 0.45 0.54 0.62 A 0.41 0.46 0.51 Zones: R7, R5 30 to 40 B 0.48 0.53 0.58 C 0.51 0.59 0.67 A 0.49 0.54 0.59 Zones: R2.5, R3 40 to 50 B 0.54 0.59 0.64 C 0.57 0.65 0.72 A 0.56 0.61 0.66 Zones: R2, CO1 50 to 60 B 0.61 0.66 0.71 Streets: Neighborhood-20'in 35' ROW C 0.63 0.70 0.77 Other: Schools A 0.64 0,69 ` 0_74 Zones: R1, CN2, CO2 60 to 70 B 0.67 0.72 0•77 Streets: Neighborhood- 24'to 28'in 40'ROW C 0,69 0.76 0.82 32'to 35'in 50' ROW Neighborhood Colier..ior A 0.71 0.76 0.81 Streets: Neighborhood-36'in 50' ROW 70 to 80 B 0.74 0.79 0.84 28'in 40'ROW C 0.75 0.81 0.87 Other: Hospitals A 0.79 0.84 0.89 Zones: RH, CN1, CM, CS, CG, EG1, EG2, IG1, IG2. 80 to 90 B 0.80 0.85 0.90 C 0.81 0.67 0.92 A 0.86 0.91 0.96 Zones: RX, CX, EX, lH • 90 to 100 B 0.87 0.92 0_97 Streets: Community Arterial Commercial C 0.87 0.92 0.97 Paved Portion Of Any Street ev DRAIN WE AREA SLOPE ' Runoff coefficients may be adjusted LLI J SURFACE CHARACTERISTICS Under 5% 5%0 to 10% Over 10% to the nearest 0.05, if adjusted m consistently throughout the project. Z Woodlands ~ Type A Soil 0.10 0.15 0.20 Soil Types: Type B Soil 0.20 0.25 0.30 A .Gravel& sandy Loam Type C Soli 0.30 0.35 0.40 B =Light Clay& Silt Loam Lawns, Pasture And Meadows C =light Clay Type A Soli 0.15 0.20 0.25 `"The land uses are typical fora given Type B Soli 0.25 0.30 0.35 percent of impervious surface. Where Type C Soil 0.30 D.40 0,50 there is or will be any significant Cultivated Land variation from typical conditions, Type A Soil 0.25 035 0.50 another percentage range should be Type B Soil 0.40 0.55 0.70 used. Type C Soil 0.50 0.65 0.80 Gravel Areas & Walks Loose 0.30 0.40 0.50 Packed 0.70 0.75 0.60 Pavements& Roots 0.90 0.95 1,00 BES August 7, 1990 CHART 10 CHART 17 INTENSITY OF PRECIPITATION FOR 2 YEAR STORM ( FANNO 2) AT FANNO CREEK STUDY AREA 4 (N45°29'00"W122°42'30") Intensity,inches Per Hour MINUTES .0 .1 .2 .3 f .4 .5 .6 .7 .8 .9 II ' 5 1.81 1.79 1.78 1.76 1.75 1.73 1.72 1.70 1.69 1.67 6 1.66 1.65 1.63 1.62 1.60 1.59 1.58 1.57 1.55 1.54 7 1.53 1.52 1.51 1.50 1.49 1.48 1.47 1.46 1.45 1.44 8 1.43 1.42 1.41 1.41 1.40 1.39 1.38 1.37 1.37 1.36 9 1.35 1.34 1.34 1.33 1.32 1.32 1.31 1.30 1.29 1.29 i 0 1.28 1.27 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.24 1.24 1.23 1.23 11 1.22 1.21 1.21 1.20 1.20 1.19 1.18 1.18 1.17 1.17 12 1.16 1.16 1.15 1.15 1.14 1.14 1.14 1.13 1.13 1.12 13 1.12 1.12 1.11 1.11 1.10 1.10 1.09 1.09 1.08 1.08 14 1.07 1.07 1.06 1.06 1.05 1,05 1.05 1.04 1.04 1.03 15 1.03 1.03 1.02 1.02 1.01 1.01 1.01 1.00 1.00 0.99 0 16 0.99 0.99 0.98 0.98 0.97 0.97 0.97 0.96 0.96 0.95 17 0.95 0.95 0.94 0.94 0.93 0.93 0.93 0.92 0.92 0.91 18 0.91 0.91 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.89 0.89 0.89 0.88 19 0.88 0.88 0.87 0.87 0.87 0.87 0.86 0.86 0.86 0.85 1 20 0.85 0.85 0.84 0.84 0.84 0.84 0.83 0.83 0.83 0.82 1 21 0.82 0.82 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.79 1 MINUTES 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 0.79 0.77 0.75 0.73 0.71 0.69 0.68 0.66 p MINUTES 30 35 40 I 45 50 60 90 120 I 0.65 0.59 0.54 I 0.51 0.48 0.43 0.34 0.30 I Reference: NOAA Atlas No. 2 CHART 18 INTENSITY OF PRECIPITATION FOR 5 YEAR STORM ( FANNO 5) AT FANNO CREEK STUDY AREA . (N45°29'00"W122°42'30"} Intensity, inches Per Hour MINUTES .0 .1 .2 .3 .4 .5 .6 .7 .8 .9 5 2.28 2.26 2.23 2.21 2.18 2.16 2.14 2.12 2.11 2.09 6 2.07 2.05 2.04 2.02 2.01 1.99 1.98 1.96 1.95 1.93 7 1.92 1.91 1.90 1.88 1.87 1.86 1.85 1.84 1.82 1.81 8 1.80 1.79 1.78 1.77 1.76 1.75 1.74 1.73 1.72 1.71 9 1.70 1.69 1.68 1.67 1.66 1.66 1.65 1.64 1.63 1.62 10 1.61 1.60 1.59 1.59 1.58 1.57 1.56 1.55 1.55 1.54 11 1.53 1.52 1.52 1.51 1.50 1.50 1.49 1.48 1.47 1.47 12 1.46 1.45 1.45 1.44 1.44 1.43 1.42 1.42 1.41 1.41 13 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.38 1.37 1.36 1.36 1.35 1.35 14 1.34 1.34 1.33 1.33 1.32 1.32 1.31 1.31 1.30 1.30 15 1.29 1.29 1.28 1.28 1.27 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.25 16 1.24 1.24 1.23 1.23 1.22 1.22 1.21 1.21 1.20 1.20 17 1.19 1.19 1.18 1.18 1.17 1.17 1.17 1.16 1.16 1.15 18 1.15 1.15 1.14 1.14 1.13 1.13 1.13 1.12 1.12 1.11 19 1.11 1.11 1.10 1.10 1.09 1.09 1.09 1.08 1.08 1.07 20 1.07 1.07 1.06 1.06 1.06 1.06 1.05 1.05 1.05 1.04 21 1.04 1.04 I 1.03 1.03 1.03 1.03 1.02 1.02 1.02 r 1.01 MINUTES 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 1.01 0.98 0.95 0.92 0.90 0.88 0.86 0.84 MINUTES 30 35 40 45 50 60 90 120 0.82 0.75 0.69 0.64 0.60 0.54 0.43 0.37 Reference: NOAA Atlas No. 2 BES August 7, 1990 ( FANNO 5) CHART 18 CHART 19 INTENSITY OF PRECIPITATION FOR 1❑ YEAR STORM ( FANNO 10 ) AT FANNO CREEK STUDY AREA (N45°29'00"W122'42'30") intensity, Inches Per Hour • MINUTES .0 .1 .2 .3 .4 .5 .6 .7' .8 .9 5 2.60 2.58 2.55 2.53 2.50 2.48 2.45 2.43 2.40 2.38 6 2.36 2.35 2.33 2.32 2.30 2.28 1 2.26 2.25 2.23 2.22 7 2.20 2.19 2.17 2.16 2.14 2.13 2.11 2.10 2.08 2.07 8 2.06 2.04 2.03 2.02 2.01 2.00 1.99 1.98 1.97 1.95 9 1.94 1.93 1.92 1.91 1.90 1.89 1.88 1.87 1.86 1.85 10 1.84 1.83 1.82 1.81 1.80 1.80 1.79 1.78 1.77 1.76 11 1.75 1.74 1.73 1.72 1.71 I 1.70 1.70 1.69 1.68 1.68 12 1.67 1.67 1.66 1.65 1.64 I 1.64 1.63 1.62 1.62 1.61 13 1.60 1.60 1.59 1.58 1.57 1.56 1.56 1.55 Ti.54 1.54 14 1.53 1.53 1.52 1.51 1.51 1.50 1.50 1.49 1.48 1.48 15 1.47 1.47. 1.46 1.46 1.45 1.44 1.44 1.43 1.42 1.42 16 1.41 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.38 1.38 1.37 1.37 1.37 1.36 17 1.36 1.36 1.35 1.35 1.34 1.34 1.33 1.33 1.32 1.32 18 1.31 1.31 1.30 1.30 1.29 I 1.29 1.29 1.28 1.28 1.27 19 1.27 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.24 1.24 1.23 20 1.23 1.23 1.22 1.22 1.22 1.21 1.21 1.21 1.20 1.20 21 1.19 1.19 # 1.18 1.18 1.18 1.17 1.17 1.16 1.16 1.15 I MINUTES 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 1.15 1.12 1.09 1.06 1.04 1.01 0.99 0.97 MINUTES 30 35 40 45 50 60 90 120 0.95 0.86 0.79 0.74 0.69 0.62 0.49 0.42 Reference: NOAA Atlas No. 2 BES August 7, 1990 ( FANNO 10 ) CHART 19 INTENSITY OF PRECIPITATION FOR 25 YEAR STORM CHART 20 ( FANN0 25) AT FANNO CREEK STUDY AREA N45°29'00"W122°42'30") Intensity, Inches Per Hour MINUTES .0 .1 .2 .3 .4 .5 .6 .7 .8 .9 5 3.02 2.99 2.96 2.93 2.90 2.88 2.85 2.82 2.79 2.77 6 2.75 2.73 2.71 2.69 2.67 2.65 2.63 2.61 2.59 2.57 7 2.55 2.53 2.51 2.49 2.48 2.47 2.45 2.44 2.42 2.41 8 2.40 2.38 2.37 12.35 2.34 2.33 2.32 2.30 2.28 2.26 9 2.25 2.24 2.23 2.22 2.21 2.20 2.19 2.18 2.17 2.16 10 2.15 2.14 2.13 2.12 2.10 2.09 2.08 2.07 2.06 2.05 11 2.04 2.03 2.02 2.01 2.00 1.99 1.98 1.97 1.96 1 1.96 12 1.95 1.94 1.93 1.92 1.91 1.90 1.89 1.88 1.87 1.86 13 1.85 1.85 1.84 1.83 1.83 1.82 1.82 1.81 1.80 1.79 14 1.78 1.78 1.77 1.76 1.76 1.75 1.74 1.73 1.72 1.71 15 1.70 1.70 1.69 1.69 1.68 1.68 1.67 1.67 1.66 1.65 16 1.64 1.64 1.63 1.62 1.61 1.60 1.60 1.59 1.59 1.58 17 1.58 1.57 1.57 1.56 1.56 1.55 1.55 1.54 1.54 1.53 18 1.53 1.52 1.52 1.51 1.51 1.50 1.50 1.49 1.48 1.48 19 1.47 1.47 1.46 1.46 1.45 1.45 1.45 1.44 1.44 1.43 20 1.43 1.42 1.42 1.41 1.41 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.38 21 1.38 1.38 1.37 1.37 1.37 1.36 1.36 1.36 1.35 1.35 MINUTES 22 23 24 25 26 I 27 28 29 1.34 1.30 1.26 1.24 1.20 1.18 1.15 1.12 MINUTES 30 35 40 45 50 60 90 120 1 E 1.10 1.00 0.92 0.86 0.80 0.72 0.56 0.48 Reference: NOAA Atlas No. 2 1 BES August 7, 1990 ( FANNO 25) CHART 20 CHART 21 INTENSITY OF PRECIPITATION FOR 50 YEAR STORM ( FANNO 50) AT FANNO CREEK STUDY AREA (N45°29'00"W122042'30") Intensity, Inches Per Hour MINurEs .0 .1 .2 .3 .4 .5 .6 .7 I .8 .9 5 3.43 3.40 3.37 3.34 3.31 3.28 3.25 3.22 3.20 3.17 6 3.14 3.11 3.09 3.06 3.04 3.01 2.99 j 2.97 2.95 2.93 7 2.91 2.89 2.87 2.85 2.83 2.82 2.80 2.78 2.76 2.74 8 2.72 2.70 2.69 2.67 2.66 2.64 2.62 2.61 i 2.59 2.58 9 2.56 2.55 12.53 2.52 J 2.50 2.49 2.48 2.46 2.45 2.43 10 2.42 2.41 2.40 2.38 2.37 12.36 2.35 2.34 2.32 2.31 11 2.30 2.29 2.28 2.27 2.26 12.25 2.24 2.23 2.22 2.21 12 2.20 2.19 2.18 2.17 2.16 j 2.16 2.15 I 2.14 2.13 2.12 13 2.11 2.10 2.09 2.08 2.07 2.07 2.06 2.05 2.04 2.03 14 . 2.02 2.01 2.00 2.00 1.99 1.98 1.97 1.96 1.96 1.95 15 1.94 1.93 1.92 1.92 1.91 11.90 1.89 1.88 1.88 1.87 16 1.86 1.85 1.85 1.84 1.83 1.83 1.82 1.61 1.80 1.80 17 1.79 1.78 1.78 1.77 1.77 1.78 1.75 1.75 ; 1.74 1.74 18 1.73 1,72 1.72 1.71 I 1.71 1.70 1.69 1.69 1.68 1.68 19 1.67 11.66 1.66 1.65 1.65 1.64 1.63 1.63 1.62 1.62 20 1.61 1.61 1.60 1.60 1.59 11.59 1.58 1.58 1.57 1.57 21 1.56 1.56 1.55 1.55 1.54 { 1.54 1.54 1.53 1.53 1.52 MINUTES 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 1.52 1.48 I 1.44 1.40 1.36 1.33 1.30 1.27 MINUTES 30 35 40 45 50 60 90 120 1.24 1.13 1.04 0.97 0.91 0.81 0.64 0.53 Reference: NOAA Atlas No. 2 BES August 7, 1990 ( FANNO 50) CHART 21 CHART 22 INTENSITY OF PRECIPITATION FOR 100 YEAR STORM ( FANNO 100) AT FANNO CREEK STUDY AREA N45°29'00"W 122°42'30") Intensity, Inches Per Hour MINUTES .0 .1 .2 .3 .4 .5 .6 .7 .8 .9 5 3.75 3.72 3.69 3.66 3.63 3.60 3.57 3.54 3.51 3.48 6 3.45 3.42 3.40 3.37 3.35 3.32 3.30 3.27 3.25 3.22 7 3.20 3.18 3.16 3.14 3.12 3.10 3.08 3.06 3.04 3.02 8 3.00 2.98 2.97 2.95 2.93 2.92 2.90 2.88 2.86 2.85 9 2.83 2.82 2.80 2.79 2.77 2.76 2.74 2.73 2.71 2.70 10 2.68 2.67 2.65 2.64 2.63 2.62 2.60 2.59 2.58 2.56 11 2.55 2.54 2.53 2.52 2.51 2.50 2.48 2.47 2.46 2.45 12 2.44 2.43 2.42 2.41 2.40 2.39 2.37 2.36 2.35 2.34 13 2.33 2.32 2.31 2.30 2.29 2.28 2.27 2.26 2.25 2.24 14 2.23 2.22 2.21 2.20 2.19 2.19 2.18 2.17 2.16 2.15 15 2.14 2.13 2.12 2.12 2.11 2.10 2.09 2.08 2.08 2.07 16 2.06 2.05 2.04 2.04 2.03 2.02 2.01 2.00 2.00 1.99 17 1.98 1.97 1.97 1.96 1.96 1.95 1.94 1.94 1.93 1.93 18 1.92 1.91 1.90 1.90 1.89 1.88 1.87 1.86 1.86 1.85 19 1.84 1.84 1.83 1.83 1.82 1.82 1.81 1.81 1.80 1.80 20 1.79 1.79 1.78 1.78 1.77 1.77 1.76 1.76 1.75 1.75 21 1.74 1.73 1.73 1.72 1.72 1.71 1.70 1.70 1.69 1.69 MtN1rES 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 1.68 1.64 1.59 1.55 1.51 1.47 1.44 1.41 MINUTES 30 35 40 45 50 60 90 120 1.38 1.25 1.15 1.07 1.00 0.89 0.69 0.58 Reierenoe: NOAA Atlas No. 2 ( FANNO 100 ) BES August 7, 1990 CHART 22 Appendix F Facility Sizing Methods Adapted from Portland Stormwater Management Manual, City of Portland, 2008 Santa Barbara Urban Hydrograph (SBUH) Method Input Data — F-1 Guide to Using Portland's PAC Tool for Lake Oswego — F-2 Pre-developed analyses shall use a CN of 70. Facilities sized using the PAC must be 125% of the PAC's recommendation to be used in the City of Lake Oswego. LO SWMM 2020 Update Appendix F- 1 Santa Barbara Urban Hydrograph (SBUH ) Method Input Data Adapted from Portland Stormwater Management Manual, City of Portland, 2008 LO SWMM 2020 Update Santa Barbara Urban Hydrograph Method The Santa Barbara Urban Hydrograph (SBUH) method is a single-event model that estimates a flow hydrograph for a representative rainfall event.The SBUH method was developed by the Santa Barbara County Flood Control and Water Conservation District. Applicable to urban areas, it converts design storm incremental excess rainfall depths into instantaneous unit hydrographs and routes them through an imaginary reservoir(Debo and Reese 2003). Elements of the SBUH Method The SBUH method depends on several variables: • Pervious (Ap) and impervious (Aimp) land areas • Time of concentration (TO calculations • Runoff curve numbers (CN) applicable to the site • Design storm Assumptions for these variables must be explained and justified in the design report. Land Area The total area, including the pervious and impervious areas within a drainage basin, shall be quantified in order to evaluate critical contributing areas and the resulting site runoff. Each area within a basin shall be analyzed separately and their hydrographs combined to determine the total basin hydrograph.Areas shall be selected to represent homogenous land use/development units. Time of Concentration Time of concentration,Tc, is the time for a theoretical drop of water to travel from the furthest point in the drainage basin to the facility being designed. (In this case,Tc is derived by calculating the overland flow time of concentration and the channelized flow time of concentration.)Tc depends on several factors, including ground slope, ground roughness, and distance of flow.The formula for determining Tc is found in Appendix E (Chart 1). When calculating Tc,the following limitations apply: • Overland sheet flow (flow across flat areas that does not form into channels or rivulets) shall not extend for more than 300 feet. • For flow paths through closed conveyance facilities such as pipes and culverts, standard hydraulic formulas shall be used for establishing velocity and travel time. (See Chapter 8 for more data on pipe flow rates and velocities.) • Flow paths through lakes or wetlands may be assumed to be zero (i.e.Tc=0). Runoff Curve Numbers • Runoff curve numbers were developed by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) after studying the runoff characteristics of various types of land. Curve numbers (CN)were developed to reduce diverse characteristics such as soil type, land usage, and vegetation into a single variable for doing runoff calculations.The runoff curve numbers approved by the City for water quantity/quality calculations are included as Table F-3 of this appendix. • The curve numbers presented in Table F-3 are for wet antecedent moisture conditions. Wet conditions assume previous rainstorms have reduced the capacity of soil to absorb water.Given the frequency of rainstorms in the Lake Oswego area,wet conditions are most likely, and give conservative hydrographic values. Design Storm • The SBUH method also requires a design storm to perform the runoff calculations. For flow control calculations,the City uses a NRCS Type 1A 24-hour storm distribution.This storm is shown in Table F-1.The depth of rainfall for the 2 through 100-year storm events is shown below in Table F-2. Table F-1. NRCS Type 1A Storm Distribution Time Step Rainfall No. Time Distribution # minutes % of Pt 0 0 0.00% 1 10 0.40% 2 20 0.40% 3 30 0.40% 4 40 0.40% 5 50 0.40% 6 60 0.40% 7 70 0.40% 8 80 0.40% 9 90 0.40% 10 100 0.40% 11 110 0.50% 12 120 0.50% 13 130 0.50% 14 140 0.50% 15 150 0.50% 16 160 0.50% 17 170 0.60% 18 180 0.60% 19 190 0.60% 20 200 0.60% 21 210 0.60% 22 220 0.60% 23 230 0.70% 24 240 0.70% 25 250 0.70% 26 260 0.70% 27 270 0.70% Table F-1. NRCS Type 1A Storm Distribution Time Step Rainfall No. Time Distribution # minutes % of Pt 28 280 0.70% 29 290 0.82% 30 300 0.82% 31 310 0.82% 32 320 0.82% 33 330 0.82% 34 340 0.82% 35 350 0.95% 36 360 0.95% 37 370 0.95% 38 380 0.95% 39 390 0.95% 40 400 0.95% 41 410 1.33% 42 420 1.33% 43 430 1.33% 44 440 1.80% 45 450 1.80% 46 460 3.40% 47 470 5.40% 48 480 2.70% 49 490 1.80% 50 500 1.34% 51 510 1.34% 52 520 1.34% 53 530 0.88% 54 540 0.88% 55 550 0.88% 56 560 0.88% 57 570 0.88% 58 580 0.88% 59 590 0.88% 60 600 0.88% 61 610 0.88% 62 620 0.88% 63 630 0.88% 64 640 0.88% 65 650 0.72% 66 660 0.72% 67 670 0.72% 68 680 0.72% 69 690 0.72% 70 700 0.72% Table F-1. NRCS Type 1A Storm Distribution Time Step Rainfall No. Time Distribution # minutes % of Pt 71 710 0.72% 72 720 0.72% 73 730 0.72% 74 740 0.72% 75 750 0.72% 76 760 0.72% 77 770 0.57% 78 780 0.57% 79 790 0.57% 80 800 0.57% 81 810 0.57% 82 820 0.57% 83 830 0.57% 84 840 0.57% 85 850 0.57% 86 860 0.57% 87 870 0.57% 88 880 0.57% 89 890 0.50% 90 900 0.50% 91 910 0.50% 92 920 0.50% 93 930 0.50% 94 940 0.50% 95 950 0.50% 96 960 0.50% 97 970 0.50% 98 980 0.50% 99 990 0.50% 100 1000 0.50% 101 1010 0.40% 102 1020 0.40% 103 1030 0.40% 104 1040 0.40% 105 1050 0.40% 106 1060 0.40% 107 1070 0.40% 108 1080 0.40% 109 1090 0.40% 110 1100 0.40% 111 1110 0.40% 112 1120 0.40% 113 1130 0.40% Table F-1. NRCS Type 1A Storm Distribution Time Step Rainfall No. Time Distribution # minutes % of Pt 114 1140 0.40% 115 1150 0.40% 116 1160 0.40% 117 1170 0.40% 118 1180 0.40% 119 1190 0.40% 120 1200 0.40% 121 1210 0.40% 122 1220 0.40% 123 1230 0.40% 124 1240 0.40% 125 1250 0.40% 126 1260 0.40% 127 1270 0.40% 128 1280 0.40% 129 1290 0.40% 130 1300 0.40% 131 1310 0.40% 132 1320 0.40% 133 1330 0.40% 134 1340 0.40% 135 1350 0.40% 136 1360 0.40% 137 1370 0.40% 138 1380 0.40% 139 1390 0.40% 140 1400 0.40% 141 1410 0.40% 142 1420 0.40% 143 1430 0.40% 144 1440 0.40% 145 1450 0.00% 146 1460 0.00% 147 1470 0.00% 148 1480 0.00% 149 1490 0.00% 150 1500 0.00% 151 1510 0.00% 152 1520 0.00% 153 1530 0.00% 154 1540 0.00% Table F-2. City of Lake Oswego Precipitation Design Storm/Recurrence 24-Hour Rainfall Depth (inches) Interval (years) Water Quality 1.0 2-year 2.38 5-year 2.85 10-year 3.20 25-year 3.73 50-year 4.13 100-year 4.54 500-year 5.55 Source: Otak 2009. Soils and Curve Numbers Soil information can be found in the latest Soil Survey for Clackamas County, Oregon Soil information may be obtained electronically from the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Services(NRCS)websoil survey http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov/app/HomePage.htm Select Start WSS Navigate by:State and County(Oregon;Clackamas) Define your area of interest(A01) using the graphic tool Determine the portions of the site that fall under each of the 4 hydrologic soil groups - Hydrologic Soil Groups Soils having a high infiltration rate(low runoff potential)when thoroughly wet(deep,well drained to Group A. excessively drained sands or gravelly sands). Soils having a moderate infiltration rate when thoroughly wet(moderately deep or deep, moderately well Group B. drained or well drained soils that have moderately fine texture to moderately coarse texture) Soils having a slow infiltration rate when thoroughly wet(soils having a layer that impedes the downward Group C. movement of water or soils of moderately fine texture or fine texture) Soils having a very slow infiltration rate(high runoff potential)when thoroughly wet(clays that have a high shrink-swell potential,soils that have a high water table,soils that have a claypan or clay layer at or near the Group D. surface, and soils that are shallow over nearly impervious material) Table F-3. Runoff Curve Numbers Approved by the City Curve Numbers for Hydrologic Soil Group Description A B C D Open space(lawns,parks,golf courses,cemeteries) Poor condition (<50%grass coverage) 68 79 86 89 Fair condition (50 to 75%grass coverage) 49 69 79 84 Good condition (>75%grass coverage) 39 61 74 80 Impervious Areas Paved areas(parking lots, roofs,driveways) 98 98 98 98 Streets and roads Paved with curbs 98 98 98 98 Paved with open ditches 83 89 92 93 Gravel 76 85 89 91 Dirt 72 82 87 89 Urban Districts Commercial and business(85%impervious) 89 92 94 95 Industrial (72%impervious) 81 88 91 93 Residential districts by average lot size 1/8 acre or less(65%impervious) 77 85 90 92 1/4 acre(38%impervious) 61 75 83 87 1/3 acre(30%impervious) 57 72 81 86 1/2 acre(25%impervious) 54 70 80 85 Woods(Good Hydrologic Condition) 70* Source:SCS 1986. Urban Hydrology for Small Watersheds. USDA Soil Conservation Service Engineering Division TR-55. June * CN for Predeveloped Forest Condition is assumed to be equivalent to Woods condition with Hydrologic Soil Group C. Appendix F-2 Guide to Using Portland's PAC Tool for Lake Oswego Adapted from Portland Stormwater Management Manual, City of Portland, 2008 LO SWMM 2020 Update * HERRERA Guide to using Portland's PAC Tool for Lake Oswego Links to Portland's PAC Tool and PAC User's Manual can be found here: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/64040 Catchment Data • Separate calculations must be performed for each catchment • Max impervious area for the tool is 1 acre or 43,560 SF • Typically assume CN =98 for impervious area • For single lots, a minimum Tc= 5 min is often assumed,though it can be longer. Information on calculating is located in Appendix E of the Lake Oswego Manual o Must justify Tc>5 min • PAC tool has a tested infiltration factor of 2 built in (same as Lake Oswego).Therefore the actual field-testing infiltration rate should be entered for'test, unless double-ring infiltrometer is selected. If using double-ring infiltrometer, use the design infiltration rate after the factor is applied. • For predeveloped condition calculations (flow control requirements only), perform a separate calculation using CN = 70 and T, based on predeveloped conditions. Selecting a Hierarchy In order of highest to lowest preference: Hierarchy 1 to Hierarchy 3 (Hierarchy 4 not applicable) • Hierarchy 1—Onsite management requirements are met with single facility o Must pass 10-year storm to meet onsite requirement. No size adjustment required. o Example: Rain Garden that fully infiltrates 10-year storm • Hierarchy 2—Onsite requirements are met with multiple facilities, i.e. separate facilities for water quality and infiltration o Must pass pollution reduction storm to meet water quality requirements. Multiply calculated facility area by 1.25 for facility design to account for larger Lake Oswego water quality storm. o Applicant must provide separate demonstration that infiltration facility is size correctly, e.g. Drywell o Example: Flow-through planter that flows into drywell (must meet UIC requirements) • Hierarchy 3—Water quality and flow control with discharge offsite o Must pass pollution reduction storm to meet water quality requirements. Multiply calculated facility area by 1.25 for facility design to account for larger Lake Oswego water quality storm. o To meet flow control requirements, peak cfs values must not exceed peak cfs values from predeveloped conditions.A separate PAC Tool calculation must be performed to represent predeveloped conditions. o Example: Rain Garden that only infiltrates water quality storm and overflows to public storm system * HERRERA Facility Types • Swale o Lake Oswego defines swale as water quality facility only(i.e. infiltration is negligible). The PAC tool should not be used for that purpose. o The PAC swale calculator may be used to size longitudinally sloped planters with non- vertical side slopes. • Planter(flat) • Planter(sloped) o Applicable for longitudinally sloped planters with vertical sidewalls. o For infiltration planters with sloped sides,the swale calculator may be used. • Basin—Rain Garden in Lake Oswego Manual Facility Configurations • Configurations A& B: total or partial infiltration, must be used for Hierarchy 1 o Configuration A— No rock volume storage o Configuration B—Includes rock volume storage • Configurations C& D: flow-through only, no infiltration o Configuration C—No liner assumed, must meet appropriate setbacks o Configuration D—Facility is lined due to setback constraints • Configurations E & F: Do not use Sizing All dimensions must comply with Lake Oswego manual • Swale (i.e.variation of Lake Oswego Planter) o Use Sloped Facility Worksheet—minimum side slopes of 3:1 • Planter(flat) • Planter(sloped) o Use Sloped Facility Worksheet—side slopes=0:1 • Basin/Rain garden o For user-defined shape: area at storage depth 1 is defined as the area of the facility at the maximum water depth.The actual facility footprint will be larger due to freeboard requirements. Output • Print Submittal button on Facility Design Page—will execute multiple print functions. All printed materials must be included in the Drainage Report. • For flow-through facilities, outlet flow data is located in Chart Data Tab "Above Grade Overflow" Appendix G Right Tree, Right Place LO SWMM 2020 Update . '.% . 4 I ,,..<0.000.„. ,.. .., e . CITY OF LAKE OSWEGO TREE ,,,. ...w. RIGHT pLAc. E . ....,,,, ..,.„._..._ .i . . . 44.. ...1.1--- : ,;11*'k 1 ' IOW '`... T '�,..fir.. { \\\\., 1y i sf CONTENTS Benefits of Trees 3 , A Selecting a Tree 4 , Planting Distances from Power Lines ; 5 I Recommended Tree Species: I ' va for 2'-4' wide planting spaces . 111111111kk 6 for 4'-6' wide planting spaces 1117_ 8 for 6'-8' wide planting spaces 12 for 8'-io' wide planting spaces 16 i for 10' wide +planting spaces 18 7, ,, \ Proper Planting and Care 22 t 1 1 Avoiding Problems 24 k Resources 25 + t 9 0 • 9 BENEFITS OF TREES Trees improve the appearance and quality of life in Lake Oswego's neighborhoods. But did you know they also help reduce stormwater runoff, filter pollutants, add oxygen to the air we breathe, and decrease glare from roadways? For example, Lake Oswego's street tree canopy (representing 13% of the total 44% citywide tree canopy cover) intercepts about 50 Olympic-size swimming pools worth of rainfall annually based on data compiled in the City's 2009 State of the Urban Forest Report. Conserving existing trees and planting new trees help reduce the size and cost of hard infrastructure that is otherwise necessary for stormwater management. .. / \ , /, F \‘ \O1li // 1 '` AI , /1l/,/// 71 �: �� - � I �/" � __-_- -,- "1'f r ,,,,,,--/--t4 ',;11 -,„. ,:::.y,.....,--,- --...- ,, ,,...,.., . i ly I s- 4' S c « SELECTING A TREE Before selecting a tree to plant, a number of factors should be considered to ensure that an optimum species is chosen based on the site conditions of the available growing space. Choosing the right tree for the right place is a decision that will have an impact on the neighborhood for decades to come. Answering these questions can help you select the most suitable and desirable tree species for your site: 1. What is the size of the available growing space? 2. What size (small, medium, or large mature height and spread) and form (crown shape) of tree will best fit the space provided? 3. Are there overhead or underground utility lines, sidewalks, driveways, courtyards, sports courts, or building foundations in the vicinity? 4. Does the site receive full sun, full shade, or part sun and part shade throughout the day? 5. Is the soil deep, fertile, and well drained, or is it shallow, compacted, and infertile? 6. Do you have time to water and prune the newly planted tree until it is established, or will you be relying on a garden or tree service for assistance? 7. Is the site exposed to frequent winds? (( 8. Are there other trees in the vicinity? 9. Do you want the tree to provide shade or seasonal color, attract wildlife, or act as a screen? 10. Do you have a preference for evergreen trees or deciduous trees that lose their leaves? NEED ADVICE? Unsure about the answers to any of these questions? Contact your local garden center, a consulting arborist, or a landscape architect. Receiving assistance from a professional before making a decision will save you time and money by planting the right tree in the right place the first time. This guidebook will help you narrow down your options for choosing the right tree in the right place. The recommended trees are just a sample of what may be available. See page 25 for a list of resources to help you learn more about each species, and visit your local nursery before making a final decision. PLANTING DISTANCES FROM POWER LINES Tall Zone Medium Zone Short Zone 50'or more from 25'-50' from Less than 25' from power lines power lines power lines No height limit Mature tree heights Mature tree heights less than 50' 25' or less J 50 high ti 25' • high 4 ee i sit iltr Elt 411- 2' - 4' WIDE PLANTING SPACES Recommended Species Mature Mature COMMON NAME SPECIES NAME Shape Size Height DECI DUOUS TREES Amur Maple Acerginnala fJi. 20' Flame Maple Acerginnala 'Flame' • S 20' !Rocky Mountain Glow Maple Acergrandidentatum 'Schmidt' 0 25' Paperback Maple Acergriseum E S 20 inJapanese Maple Acer palmatum • T S Roughbark Maple Acer triflorum S 20' [Frans Fontaine Hornbeam Carpinus betulus 'Frans Fontaine' 1 S Cornelian Cherry Dogwood Corpus mas dirlw S 20' Eddies White Wonder Dogwood Corpus nuttalli x corpus florida S Grace Smoketree Cotinus coggygria x obovatus 'Grace' , ,. S 20' American Smoketree Cotinus obovatus A • Black Hawthorn Crataegus douglasii S 25' Crimson Cloud Hawthorn Crataegus laevigata 'Crimson Cloud' 41111 Wedding Bells Silverbell Halesia carolina 'Wedding Bells' 0 S 20' ICo1um Goldenchain Laburnum anagyroides 'Columnaris' T S 20'"1. Adirondack Crabapple Malus 'Adirdondack' S 18' !Purple Prince Crabapple Malus 'Purple Prince' S 20'ma Red Barron Crabapple Malus 'Red Barron' 1 S 18' Golden Raindrops Crabapple Malus 'Schmidtcutleaf' 1 Prariefire Crabapple Malusspp. 'Prariefire' , 4111 S 20' `Tschonoskii Crabapple Malus tschonoskii 111M 1 Chinese Pistache Pistachio chinensis VOA S 25' [Beauty Plum Semi-Dwarf Prunus salicinia 'Beauty' Amanogawa Cherry Prunus serrulata 'Amanogawa' 1 S 20' IBig Cis Plum Prunus x cistena 'Schmidtcis' 401 Spire Cherry Prunus x hilleri I! S 30' Japanese Stewartia Stewartia pseudocamellia S Japanese Snowbell Stryaxjaponicus S 25' Snowcone Japanese Snowbell Styrax japonicus JFS-D' 40S 20' Ivory Silk Japanese Tree Lilac Syringa reticulata 'Ivory Silk' S 20' Summer Sprite Linden Tilia cordata 'Halka' 5 20' Full Sun• Part Sun, Part Shade• # =OK to plant under overhead utility lines Full Shade• (0 = Not OK to plant under overhead utility lines Mature Spread Soil Type Sun # Remarks 20' all ••• # Very hardy,fall color,attracts wildlife 20' all •• # Fall color,early to leaf out in spring,fragrant flowers 15' well drained •• # Great fall color 20 all ••• 4 Attractive peeling bark, red or multi-colored in fall 6' all •• # Fall color, many varieties such as'Butterfly'and 'Sango Kaku' 20' loam or sand •• # Fall color,textured bark 15' all • O Narrowest of the Carpinus b. cultivars 20' clay or loam •• # Gold or red in fall, resistant to Verticillium 20' all •• # Hybrid of the native dogwood generally more resistant to anthracnose 15' all • # Outstanding summer and fall color 30' all • ® Tolerant of hot and dry sites,attractive fall color,purple flower clusters 15' all •• # Showy flower,conspicuous thorns,attracts wildlife 18' all •• # Thorny branches, red flower, red fruit 15' all •• # White bell-shaped flowers,yellow fall foliage 10' moist • # Narrow upright crown,dense clusters of bright yellow flowers in spring 10' all •• # Compact dense crown with many white flowers 20' all • # Purple bronze foliage, rose red flower 8' all •• # Narrow ascending branch structure,purple-green foliage,dark red flower 15' all •• # Unique leaves,white flowers,small golden yellow fruit 20' all • # Disease resistant,attracts wildlife 15' all •• ® Bright orange fall color,pink flower,attracts wildlife 25' all •• # Impressive red-orange fall color,attracts wildlife 15' all • # Large fruit early summer,needs regular pruning 6' all •• # Very narrow and upright structure,pale pink spring flowers 12' all •• # Light pink and very fragrant spring flowers,dark purple foliage 10' all •• # Very narrow upright structure,orange-red fall color,pink flowers in spring 25' well drained •• ® Needs ample water,striking bark,vibrant red fall color 25' well drained •• # White flowers hang down from branches,fruit hangs on into fall 20' well drained • # Pendulous white flowers,water weekly for first three summers 15' well drained •• # Showy,creamy white flowers,attracts wildlife 15' all •• # Dense compact crown,sheared appearance,yellow fall color 101 Round •Oval AIL Pyramidal i Vase iiriLb Umbrella t Columnar 4' - 6' WIDE PLANTING SPACES Recommended Species Mature Mature COMMON NAME SPECIES NAME Shape Size Height DECI DUOUS TREES Trident Maple Acer buergeranum r S 20' Hedge Maple Acer campestre M 30' David's Maple Acerdavidii 411S 25' Red Sunset Red Maple Acer rubrum 'Red Sunset' 1 M 45' Apollo Maple Acersaccharum 'Barrett Cole' 1 S 25' Tatarian Maple Acer tataricum E S 25' Pyramidal European Hornbeam Carpinus betulus 'Fastigiate' 1 M 40' American Hornbeam Carpinus caroliniana 110141reS 30' Japanese Hornbeam Carpinus japonica S 25' Redbud Cercis canadensis S 25' Chinese Fringetree Chionanthus retusus 401S 25' Glorybower Tree Clerodendrum trichotomum S 25' June Snow Giant Dogwood Corn us controversy 'June Snow' $01* S 30' Kousa Dogwood Corn us kousa 'National'or'Satomi 2eiri1 S 25' Chinese Dogwood Corn us kousa var. chinensis 1 S 30' Washington Hawthorn Crataegus phaenopyrum E S 25' Dawyck Purple Beech Fagus sylvatica 'Dawyck Purple' 1 M 40' Purple Fountain Beech Fagus sylvatica 'Purple Fountain' I M 25' Autumn Applause Ash Fraxinus americana Autumn Applause' M 60' Autumn Purple Ash Fraxinus americana 'Junginger' A 0M 45' Golden Desert Ash Fraxinus excelsior'Aureafolia' 11S 20' Flowering Ash Fraxinus ornus S 25' Princeton Sentry Ginkgo Ginkgo biloba 'Princeton Sentry' 1 M 40' Goldenrain Tree Koelreuteria paniculata 40M 35' Arnold Tuliptree Liriodendron tulipifera 'Arnold' ! S 30' Amur Maackia Maackia amurensis r M 25' Elizabeth Magnolia Magnolia acuminata 'Elizabeth' A S 25' Kobus Magnolia Magnolia kobus 40M 40' Merrill Magnolia Magnolia x loebneri 'Merrill' V S 25' Marilee Crabapple Malus 'Jarmin' • S 24' Red Jewel Crabapple Malus 'Jewelcole' A S 15' List continues on Page 10 Full Sun• Part Sun, Part Shade• # =OK to plant under overhead utility lines Full Shade• O = Not OK to plant under overhead utility lines Mature Spread Soil Type Sun # Remarks 25' all ••• # Fall color,attractive exfoliating bark,tolerant of urban stresses 30' well drained •• # Striking bark,varieties include Queen Elizabeth and Metro Gold 25' moist •• # Fall color,attractive striped bark 30' wet to moist •• O Attractive bark, red or orange fall color, provide good drainage in clay soil 10' all •• O Unique narrowness,compact branching,fall color 15' all •• # Tolerant of urban stresses,fall color,compact crown 30' clay or loam •• 0 Provides good screening,attractive fall color 25' clay or loam •• O Needs ample water 25' well drained •• # Attractive foliage,usually trouble free 25' all •• # Pink flowers in spring before leaves emerge 25' well drained •• # Showy flower,fruit attracts birds,generally requires little maintenance 20' well drained • # Colorful flowers in summer,blue berries in fall,fruit attracts birds 40' well drained •• O Showy flower,wide spreading,attractive fall color,attracts wildlife 25' clay or loam •• # Red,gold,or multi-colored in fall,resistant to Verticillium 20' all • # Attractive bark,showy flower,fall color 20' all •• # Attractive fall color,orange-red fruit matures in winter and attracts birds 15' all •• O Deep purple foliage with no change in fall,attractive bark 15' well drained • O Weeping foliage is deep purple with no change in fall 40' all •• O Fall color,this is a seedless ash variety 40' well drained • B Fall color,this is a seedless ash variety 20' all •• # Golden twigs,fall color 25' all •• # Fragrant flowers,prolific seed producer 15' all •• 0 Non-fruiting,fragrant flower,bright yellow fall color 35' all •• O Tolerant of urban stresses,showy yellow flowers 10' all • O Fast grower,narrow crown,susceptible to aphids 20' well drained • # Showy flowers,gold fall color 15' all • O Yellow flower 30' well drained •• O Showy,fragrant flower 25' all •• B Fragrant white flower 10' all •• # Pink buds open to white blooms,generally fruitless,narrow crown 12' all •• # Bright red fruit through winter,abundant white spring flowers 40 Round Oval Pyramidal i Vase Umbrella t Columnar 4' - 6' WIDE PLANTING SPACES - Continued Mature Mature COMMON NAME SPECIES NAME Shape Size Height DECI DUOUS TREES Vanessa Persian Ironwood Parrotia persica 'Vanessa' r 30' Crimson Pointe Plum Prunus cerasifera 'Cripoizam' 144 S 25' hiro Plum Semi-Dwarf Prunussalicinia 4 ' 25' Canada Red Chokecherry Prunus virginiana 'Canada Red' Alk S 25' Chanticleer Pear Pyrus calleryana 'Chanticleer' v 40' Jack Pear Pyrus calleryana 'Jackzam' 00 S 16' Hosui Asian Pear Pyrus pyrifolia 'Hosui' 1 S 15' Crimson Spire Oak Quercus alba x Q. robur'Crimschmidt' 4 M 45' Forest Green Oak Quercus frainetto 'Schmidt' 4 M Skyrocket Oak Quercus robar'Fastigiata' ' 1 A M 45' Cascara Rhamnus purshiana I E tfor Summer Charm Tree Lilac Syringa pekinensis 'Summer Charm' T S 20' Chancellor Linden Tilia cordata 'Chancellor' # Corinthian Linden Tilia cordata 'Corzam' # M 45' Greenspire Linden Tilia cordata 'Greenspire' Sterling Silver Linden Tilia tomentosa 'Sterling' • M 40' Emerald Sunshine Elm Ulmus propinqua VS-6ieberich' IP • M City Sprite Zelkova Zelkova serrata 'City Sprite' I S 24' Columnar Zelkova Zelkova serrata 'Musashino' 4 ! M 45' EVERGREEN TREES Edith l3ogue Magnolia Magnolia grandiflora 'Edith L3ogue' 1 M 30' NOTES mlr Full Sun• Part Sun, Part Shade• # =OK to plant under overhead utility lines Full Shade• O = Not OK to plant under overhead utility lines Mature Spread Soil Type Sun # Remarks 15' well drained •• # Beautiful bark and fall color,slow growing and long-lived 10' all •• # Narrow crown,pink buds open to white blooms,purple foliage all # Large fruit,showy white flower 20' well drained •• # Red leaf,white spring flower,attracts wildlife 15' 0 all • O Abundant white flowers in early spring 10' all • # Dwarf,low maintenance,blooms late,misses many early frosts &fungal blights 10' all • # Produces delicious edible fruit,attracts butterflies 15' well drained • B Narrow crown, rusty red fall color 30' all • 0 Deep green glossy foliage,attracts wildlife 15' well drained • B Narrow and upright form all ••• B Showy flower,textured bark,attracts wildlife 20' all •• # Glossy foliage,sprays of creamy white flowers,yellow fall color 2 0 Fragrant showy flower,gold fall color 15' all •• B Narrowest of the linden cultivars all 0 Dense round crown,good symmetry 30' all _ •• 1 0 Tolerates hedging all •• 0 Yellow fall color with purple tips,strong upright structure 18' all •• # Dense compact crown, low maintenance 15' all •• B Fine textured leaves,yellowish-red to rusty-red fall color 15' all ••• 0 Broadleaf evergreen,showy flower 40 Round I Oval i Pyramidal t 1 Vase 411r Umbrella i Columnar 6' - 8' WIDE PLANTING SPACES Recommended Species Mature Mature COMMON NAME SPECIES NAME Shape Size Height DECI DUOUS TREES Red Maple Acerrubrum AS j M 1. 50' Autumn Flame Red Maple Acer rubrum 'Autumn Flame' 41111M 45' Bowhall Red Maple Acerrubrum 'Bowhall' r- i ir-- M IF 45' October Glory Red Maple Acerrubrum 'October Glory' 01401M 45' Sugar Maple Acersaccharum E M Green Mountain Maple Acersaccharum 'Green Mountain' E M 50' European Hornbeam Carpinus betulus M Hackberry Celtis occidentalis Y M 50' Katsura Cercidiphyllum japonicum 04141rikM American Yellowwood Cladrastis kentukea 411M 35' Paul's Scarlet Hawthorn Crataegus laevigata 'Paul's Scarlet' ' Lavelle Hawthorn Crataegus x lavallei T S 30' Dove Tree Davidia involucrata Tricolor Beech Fragus sylvatica 'Roseomarginata' k M 40' Raywood Ash Fraxinus oxycarpa 'Raywood' Summit Ash Fraxinus pennsylvanica 'Lanceolata' r M 45' Patmore Ash Fraxinus pennsylvanica 'Patmore' M Saratoga Ginkgo Ginkgo biloba 'Saratoga' M 35' Autumn Gold Ginkgo Ginkgo biloba 'Autumn Gold' 414141.1L Halka Ginkgo Ginko biloba 'Halka' M 45' Honey Locust Gleditsia triacanthos var. inermis M Galaxy Magnolia Magnolia 'galaxy' M 30' Yulan Magnolia Magnolia denudata 411M Black Tupelo Nyssa sylvatica M 45' David Odom Afterburner Tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 'David Odom' M 45' I American Hophornbeam Ostrya virginiano M 35' Sourwood Oxydendrum arboreum 11 M 30'OM Amur Cork Tree Phellodendron amurense 00 M 40' Mt. St. Helens Plum Prunus 'Frankthrees' S miliM Newport Plum Prunus 'Newport' A Illi ¶ S 20' Snow Goose Cherry Prunus 'Snow Goose' r! S 201.11. List continues on Page 14 Full Sun• Part Sun, Part Shade• # =OK to plant under overhead utility lines Full Shade• 0 = Not OK to plant under overhead utility lines Mature Spread Soil Type Sun # Remarks 40' all •• 0 Fall color,varieties such as'Armstrong','Bowhall','Franksred','Morgan','Scarsen' 45' wet to moist •• 0 Attractive bark, red or orange fall color, provide good drainage in clay soil 20' well drained •• 0 Multiple upright branch structure susceptible to breakage 30' well drained •• 0 Red,gold,or orange fall color,good shade tree or street tree 40' all •• 0 Source of maple syrup, multi-colored in fall 40' all •• 0 Tolerant of heat and drought,gold fall color 40' clay or loam •• 0 Dense crown,provides good screening,attractive fall color 35' all ••• 0 Drought tolerant, late to leaf-out in spring,attractive fall color,textured bark 40' loam or sand •• 0 Requires moist soils,attractive foliage and fall color 35' all • 0 Fragrant,white,showy pendulous flowers,fall color 20' all • # Thorny branches,double rose flowers 20' well drained • # Drought tolerant,showy spring flowers,orange fruit attracts birds 30' well drained •• 0 Dove-like flowers 20' well drained • 0 Leaves are variegated with pink,white,and green,with no change in fall 30' all • 0 Tolerant of urban stresses,dense crown,attractive fall color 25' all •• 0 Seedless variety,glossy green foliage,yellow fall color 35' all •• 0 Uniform upright branching 30' all •• 0 Central leader with upright narrow form 30' all •• 0 Non-fruiting,gold fall color 40' all •• 0 Uniform and symmetrical branching 35' all •• 0 Thornless variety,tolerant of urban stresses 15' all • 0 Showy pink flowers 35' all •• 0 Creamy white,fragrant flowers 20' well drained •• 0 Fall color,textured bark,attracts wildlife 20' well drained •• 0 Named in memory of LO City Arborist David Odom,unique upright structure 25' all •• 0 Attractive exfoliating bark,good fall color,fruit resembles hops 20' well drained •• 0 White midsummer flowers 30' all •• 0 Fragrant leaves and fruit,early leaf drop 20' all •• # Dense crown,purple foliage emerges early, light pink flowers 20' all •• # Upright spreading crown,purple-red foliage, light pink flowers 20' all •• # Upright crown becomes wider with age,white flowers 0 Round I Oval Pyramidal !Vase 411rtil Umbrella / Columnar 6' — 8' WIDE PLANTING SPACES - Continued Mature Mature COMMON NAME SPECIES NAME Shape Size Height DECI DUOUS TREES Thundercloud Plum Prunus cerasifera 'Thundercloud' • S 20' Columnar Sargent Cherry Prunussargentii 'columnaris' IV M 35' Akebono Yoshino Cherry Prunus xyedoensis 'Akebono' 10 alr I S 25' Chojuro Asian Pear Pyrus pyrifolia 'Chojuro' E M 30' Sawtooth Oak Quercus acutissima • Y M 40' Swamp White Oak Quercus bicolor • M 60' Skymaster Oak Quercus robur 'Skymaster' iiM 50' Shumard Oak Quercusshumardii M 50' Pacific Willow Salix lucida ssp. lasiandra E M 40' Beijing Gold Tree Lilac Syringa pekinensis 'Zhang Zhiming' ! S 20' Redmond Linden Tilia americana 'Redmond' L 60' Harvest Gold Linden Tiliacordataxmongolica'Harvest Gold' A M 40' Frontier Elm Ulmuscarpinifolia x U.parvofolia'Frontier got I M 40' Prospector Elm Ulmus wilsoniana T M 40' Patriot Elm Ulmus 'Patriot' IP M 50' Green Vase Zelkova Zelkova serrata 'Green Vase' T M 50' Village Green Zelkova Zelkova serrata 'Village Green' t M 40' Wireless Zelkova Zelkova serrata 'Schmid tlow' T S 24' Marina Madrone Arbutus 'Marina' ` 1 M 30' Shore Pine Pinus contorta M 35' Arnold Sentinel Austrian Pine Pinus nigra 'Arnold Sentinel' S 30' Fastigiate White Pine Pinus strobus 'Fastigiata' # M 40' Pacific Yew Taxus brevifolia E M 40' Ccc NOTES s. i j' y:� k r c`C, i 1 ' Full Sun• Part Sun, Part Shade• # =OK to plant under overhead utility lines Full Shade• 0 = Not OK to plant under overhead utility lines Mature Spread Soil Type Sun # Remarks 20' all •• # Retains deep purple leaf color through the growing season,pink flowers 15' well drained • 0 Pink flowers, reddish bark 25' moist •• # Showy spring flower 15' all • ® Edible fruit, needs regular pruning 40' all • 0 Bronze fall color or no change 25' all • 0 Upper and lower leaf surfaces contrast in color,attracts wildlife 25' all •• 0 Provides good screening 40' moist • 0 Thrives in areas with poor drainage,attracts wildlife 30' moist • ® Tallest native willow 20' all •• # Upright spreading crown,sprays of yellow flowers in June 30' all •• 0 Heart-shaped leaf,yellow fall color 30' all •• 0 Attractive bark, bright golden yellow fall color 30' all •• 0 Substitute for American elm due to pest and disease resistance 30' well drained •• 0 Substitute for American elm due to pest and disease resistance 40' all •• 0 Substitute for American elm due to pest and disease resistance 40' all •• 0 Orange-brown to bronze-red fall color 38' all • 0 Bronze or red fall color 36' all •• # Broadly spreading v-shaped crown,attractive red fall color 30' all •• 0 Broadleaf evergreen,showy flowers,attractive red-brown bark 20' all •• 0 Dark green needles 10' all • 0 Dense foliage,narrow crown,slow growing 10' well drained • 0 Narrow form,plant in groups to create a hedge 30' all ••• 0 Drought tolerant 0 Round Oval i Pyramidal !Vase C Umbrella I Columnar 81 — i 0' WIDE PLANTING SPACES Recommended Species Mature Mature COMMON NAME SPECIES NAME Shape Size Height DECIDUOUS TREES lState Street Miyabe Maple Acermiyabei 'Morton' M 50' Heritage River Birch l3etulanigra 'Heritage' M 45' IPaper Birch l3etula papyrifera 0 iteM 50' Hardy Rubber Tree Eucommiaulmoides 0 M 50' IRivers Purple Beech Faguas sylvatica 'Riversii' M 50' European Beech Fagus sylvatica M 50' rUrbanite Ash Fraxinus pennsylvanica 'Urbanite' E L 50' Kentucky Coffeetree Gymnocladus dioicus r L 50' Tulip Tree Liriodendron tulipifera L 60' Dawn Redwood Metasequoia glyptostroboides L 75' `Bloodgood London Planetree Platanus x acerifolia '6loodgood' A. L 50' Yoshino Flowering Cherry Prunus x yedoesis F M 30' 1 Scarlet Oak Quercus coccinea A L 75' Bur Oak Quercus macrocarpa 0 L 65' ' American Linden Tilia americana L 60' Accolade Elm Ulmus japonica x wilsoniana 'Morton' 1 L 60' [Pioneer Elm Ulmus 'Pioneer' L 50' Zelkova Zelkova serrata L 65' EVERGREEN TREES al Lodgepole Pine Pinus contorta var. latifolia L 50' Scotch Pine PinussylvestrisA =. 50' Western Red Cedar Thuja plicata L 70' NOTES Full Sun• Part Sun, Part Shade• # =OK to plant under overhead utility lines Full Shade• 0 = Not OK to plant under overhead utility lines Mature Spread Soil Type Sun # Remarks 31 well drained •• ® Attractive bark,yellow fall color,good heat and drought tolerance 30' all •• ® Attractive bark,gold in fall 311. loam or sand ••• ® Poor drought tolerance,attractive bark 50' loam •• ® Rubber is extracted from the wood 40' all •• ® Deep purple foliage with no change in fall,attractive bark 40' well drained • 0 Beautiful bark,aphids may be problematic 40' all •• ® Seedless variety,yellow-bronze fall color 40' all •• O Fragrant flowers,seed pods are toxic when ingested by humans 30' all •• 0 Beautiful fall color,susceptible to aphids 35' well drained • 0 Textured bark,deciduous conifer 40' all • 0 Attractive bark,yellow fall color ' 30' well drained • # Showy spring flower 40' all • 0 Scarlet fall color,can garden beneath canopy I 50' all • 0 Upright crown becomes round and spreading with maturity,attracts wildlife 30' all •• 0 Fragrant flower,gold fall color I 40' all •• 0 Substitute for American elm due to pest and disease resistance 50' all •• 0 Substitute for American elm due to pest and disease resistance 50' all •• 0 Bronze,red,gold,or multicolored in fall 25' well drained •• 0 Medium green needles 130' all • 0 Striking red-orange bark 25' well drained ••• 0 Attractive bark,branches droop and turn upright,attracts wildlife Round Oval A Pyramidal t 1 Vase Illy Umbrella i Columnar 10' WIDE+ PLANTING SPACES Recommended Species Mature Mature COMMON NAME SPECIES NAME Shape Size Height DECI DUOUS TREES Bigleaf Maple Acermacrophyllumi 5' Catalpa Catalpa speciosa ' ` IiirL 60' White Ash Fraxinus americans 60' Oregon Ash Fraxinus latifolia 1r• L 60' or Green Ash Fraxinus pennsylvanica Maidenhair Tree Ginkgo biloba L 60' Oregon White Oak Quercusgarryana SAL Pin Oak Quercus palustris A OA 11.1 L 65' Willow Oak Quercus phellos E L Red Oak Quercus rubra ,.r L 65' Lacebark Elm Ulmusparvifolia r L 60' Grand Fir Abies grandis L 100'+ Madrone Arbutus menziesii M 50' IIncense-Cedar Calocedrus decurrens L 80' Atlas Cedar Cedrus atlantica L 65' IDeodar Cedar Cedrus deodara L 80' Port-Orford-Cedar Chamaecyparis lawsoniana L 75'+ `H inoki False Cypress Chamaecyparis obtusa A M 50' Southern Magnolia Magnolia grandiflora r L 70' !Norway Spruce Picea abies A L 100'+ Engelmann Spruce Picea engelmannii A L 100' Colorado Spruce Picea pungens L 65' ■ Sitka Spruce Picea sitchensis L 120' 'Lacebark Pine Pinus bungeana A L 50' Western White Pine Pinus monticola A L 65' Er Austrian Pine Pinus nigra A L 55' Ponderosa Pine Pinus ponderosa A L 100'+ Japanese Black Pine Pinus thunbergiana A M 30' Zebrina Himalayan Pine Pinus wallinchiana 'Zebrina' M 30' Douglas-Fir Pseudotsuga menziesii A L 100'+ List continues on Page 20 Full Sun• Part Sun, Part Shade• 4 =OK to plant under overhead utility lines Full Shade• 0 = Not OK to plant under overhead utility lines Mature Spread Soil Type Sun 4 Remarks 50' all A •• 0 Fall color,attracts wildlife,leaves may clog storm drains 40' all •• I 0 Showy flower,bean-like fruit, no odor compared to other Catalpa species 45' 0 Plant seedless varieties 30' all •• 0 Riparian species 40' * all •• 0 Plant seedless varieties 45' all •• 0 Many large stature varieties available,plant males to avoid stinky fruit 50' well drained • 0 Large native oak,western gray squirrel dependent on species for food source 30' all •• 0 Leaves hang on the tree in fall 45' all •• 0 Bronze or gold fall color, leaves hang on the tree in fall 40' all •• 0 Bronze, red,orange,and multicolored fall foliage 50' all •• 0 Interesting mottled bark 30' well drained •• 0 Susceptible to Balsam Wooly Adelgid (Adelges picene) 50' clay or loam ••• 0 Difficult to establish,striking bark,fragrant flowers 20' all •• 0 Drought tolerant I 40' all •• 0 Blue green needles,fragrant 40' all •• 0 Drought tolerant,attractive bark,weeping cultivar 'Pendula'available I 20' loam or sand •• 0 Can be used as a windbreak,highly susceptible to Port-Orford-Cedar root disease 20' all •• 0 Attractive bark,susceptible to spider mites all 60' all •• 0 Broadleaf evergreen, large fragrant white flowers 30' all •• 0 Good windbreak ■ 30' all •• 0 Susceptible to spruce budworm 20' all •• & Blue-green needles111 40' all •• 0 Needs ample water 30' all •• 0 Spreading nature,often with multiple trunks,attractive bark 20' all •• 0 Susceptible to white pine blister rust 40' all •• 0 Dark green needles 111= 30' all, moist • 0 Long needles,attracts wildlife 20' all • 0 Irregular shape . 9. 20' well drained • 0 Dwarf pine,slow growing 30' all • 0 Oregon's state tree "I •Round Oval Pyramidal !Vase Alirit Umbrella 1 Columnar 10' WIDE+ PLANTING SPACES - Continued Mature Mature COMMON NAME SPECIES NAME Shape Size Height EVERGREEN TREES Coast Redwood Sequoia sempervirens L 100'+ Giant Sequoia Sequoiadendron giganteum L 1004 Western Hemlock Tsuga heterophylla L 100'+ Oregon Myrtle Umbellularia californica r ' L 65' Li; NOTES Full Sun• Part Sun, Part Shade• $ =OK to plant under overhead utility lines Full Shade• 0 = Not OK to plant under overhead utility lines Mature Spread Soil Type Sun # Remarks 40' all •• 0 Needs ample water, may reach 300'+in the wild 40' all • 0 Largest living organism on earth, long-lived 30' all ••• 0 Needs ample moisture 50' all ••• 0 Broadleaf evergreen,drought tolerant Round Oval A Pyramidal /Vase 11.1 Umbrella Columnar , f PROPER PLANTING AND CARE Proper planting and long-term care will help protect your investment in a new tree. Select a healthy specimen with good structure from the nursery and transport the tree cautiously. Ideally, new trees are planted in the fall after leaf drop or early spring before bud break. However, given adequate care, new trees can also be planted during the growing season. • Locate underground utilities before digging by calling (503) 246-6699. • Dig a hole about as deep as the root ball and about three times the width of the root ball. The wide planting hole will help promote root growth through the disturbed soil surrounding the root ball. The hole should not be so deep that the trunk flare is covered; the area where the roots spread at the base of the tree should be exposed. • Cut any circling roots prior to planting and only lift the tree by the root ball. • Adjust the tree straight-upright in the hole and backfill with good topsoil. Do not compact the soil, but gently pack to eliminate air and settle with water. Fertilizer should only be used if recommended based on soil testing results. • Staking may be needed to help the tree grow upright. Only install stakes if necessary and place them far enough from the tree that they don't stab the root ball. Remove stakes after one growing season to help the tree develop good, sound structure. • Apply 2 - 4 inches of mulch around the base of the tree, but not directly against the trunk. Mulch helps to retain moisture, moderate soil temperature, and minimize weed growth. • Keep the soil moist, but not saturated and do not apply water to the tree trunk. Water the minimum amount needed based on temperature and rain conditions. • Minor pruning may be needed if branches were damaged during planting or for improved structure or overhead clearance following establishment. Pruning should be performed by a qualified tree service. • Over time, observe changes to the tree and contact a consulting arborist for assistance if something seems out of the ordinary. • 1/) • TREE PLANTING r • Remove all tags and labels gillk • Keep mulch layer away from tree trunk • Root flare above soil line ' tktiiiiitiii.iIi;ic7 MVO • Remove the container,any rope or wire,and as much of the burlap as possible if field grown. AVOIDING PROBLEMS Some tree species may not be desirable as street trees or in other particular locations due to messiness, insects, thorns, or the danger they pose from falling branches (weak wood), sidewalk buckling, or the tendency to topple over due to shallow roots. The trees listed below are prohibited as street trees in new development per the Lake Oswego Master Plant List (LOC 50.11.004). Acermacrophyllum- Big-leaf Maple- Leaves block drainage, roots buckle sidewalks Acer negundo- Box Elder- Insects,weak wood Acerrubrum- Red Maple- Shallow roots Acersaccharinum- Silver Maple- Shallow roots,weak wood Aesculus hippocastanum- Common Horse Chestnut- Messy fruit - fiqr- Betulus species- Birches- Insects,weak wood Carya species- Hickories- Fruit causes litter,safety problems Catalpa species- Catalpas- Seed pods cause litter problems Corylus species- Filberts- Fruit causes litter,safety problems Crataegus species- Hawthorns-Thorns,fruit causes litter,safety problems Fraxinus species-Ashes- Seed pods cause litter problems Gleditsia triacanthos species- Honey Locust- Seeds cause litter problems Juglans species- Walnuts- Fruit causes litter problems g� t Morus species- Mulberries- Fruit causes litter,safety problems F d` „ -,„trk .A Populous species- Poplars- Shallow roots,weak wood t ti Robinia species- Locusts- Weak wood,suckers kµ Salix species- Willows- Shallow roots,weak wood �c '.. Via .' � . �, Ulmus fulva- Slippery Elm - Insects,shallow roots,weak wood Ulmus pumila- Siberian Elm - Shallow roots,weak wood RESOURCES There are lots of resources available to help you find the right tree. Here are some ideas to get you started: • Visit friendsoftrees.org to see photos of each tree in different seasons, their leaves, fruit and bark, and an interactive illustration of the size and shape the tree will be at different stages of its life. • Search the internet using specific tree names to get photos and information. • Download an application for tree identification on your mobile device. • Walk around the neighborhood and find mature trees that appeal to you. • • Use the library to find illustrated field guides to local trees. • Visit local nurseries to see trees and talk to the experts. • Consult with an arborist or landscape architect. / NOTES T Revised 9/12 Botanical illustrations by Zelimir Borzan, University of Zagreb. Used with kind permission. Brochure design:wizmographics.com. LAKE OSWEGO 4 Centennial 1910-2010 ' ' .4k,,, K+. : " ,,_ . . CITY OF LAKE OSWEGO PLANNING & BUILDING SERVICES , www.ci .oswego.or.us Ph 503.635.0290 Fx 503.635.0269 • 380 A Avenue, 3rd Floor Post Office Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 : ,,.:, , .. . , .f., ::.:..lit i t.- }}t 4 , J .,, / Appendix H Approved Plant Lists and Seed Mixes Approved Plant Lists — H-1 Approved Seed Mixes — H-2 LO SWMM 2020 Update Appendix H-1 Approved Plant Lists LO SWMM 2020 Update c§`461)0,4_ Lake Oswego Plant List: Rushes or 0 vAillr o .10011111P1OREGO) d N e N C co G Z Z N aN c 0E E , 04_- 7 i E c H 5 t - ., R o c a •a m ' Arrowhead shaped fruit at the Eleocharis palustris tip of the plant. . ' Wet Sun to Part Sun 2 to 3 ft 2 ft y ..., y Creeping Spikerush Attracts birds and amphibians .,..ril\\,,,.,.. i r '- r Ir. •` Pur le flowers in s rin Drou ht Juncus acuminatus tolerant.Attracts birds and ' Wet Sun to Part Sun 3 ft 3 ft x'' Taper-Tip Rush pollinators. !' ti� a Evergreen. j;.-•.l Brown flowers in summer. .• Grass like. .: �. Y Juncus effusus var Sun 2 ft • pacificus Moist to Wet 3 ft Attracts birds. Pacific Rush - f - .r • r' ,._ 1. c ., Iris-like leaves. L, , r- Juncus ensifolius -. `'df Moist to Wet Sun 2 ft �; ' � � 2 ft Attracts birds. Dagger-Leaf Rush -: _. •.* ,y�. ,. 1.A v . , Juncus occidentalis Evergreen. J,1''f' (r rs. Moist to Wet Sun 1 to 2 ft 2 ft g =r�w ,a-�`- �� ` Western Rush LY, Blue-green foliage with clustered : e r '"' '-`'_''L` brown seedheads in summer. -.._t4 'f:,t'Ci, , Juncus patens ^�_ t-fig r Moist to Wet Sun 2 ft r e - '' 2 ft Attracts birds. �i--��-�--`?e•-',��w•r^;,;� Spreading Rush . ,,ti,.� _ `: Evergreen. :7, 1, .'itirupik. 1 ,t��.,.( .. :; ''a f ;.'. ''} k'h1N" n Juncus effusus Moist to Wet Sun 1 to 2.5 ft 1 ft Semi-evergreen. f Soft Rush . .. / /- s Lake Oswego Plant List: Sedges 0 O v o REGO� y 000) C N G ZZ N d N c U E E E H •7 L L .. R O C a R C1c� rnz = 3 av '.1741.1;.''::14 IF,, ,,,T...s,-...,„-' .: � F ' ,� • �. ' �s��� Dense spreading sedge with .,.,�. ,�� Carex morrowii foliage effect of dark green iF. Moist to Wet Part Shade 1 ft 2 ft with white borders. _ „/, ,;'tom `" Ice Dance Sedge to Shade Yam: ,i,.•� _ -: VV.�� Evergreen sedge that typicallyA% ,=~ ,• Carex comans _ -.� New Zealand Sedge Moist to Wet Sun 1 to 2 ft Ito 2 ft grows in dense weeping clumps _�` • of thin hair-like leaves. oill = , :` - Carex densa Good for slowing flow and �� Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 2 ft 2 ft 7' a� ►+'�-�`7•,:i Dense Sedge trapping sediment . Evergreen. r, 1 �, Pleasant color that changes 71,14,4, `fir • - throughout the season. �'�'`;'-.., '• ,;' -. Carex n Sedsa ea Moist to Wet Sun to Shade 3 ft 1 to 1.5 ft ' , " Autumn Sedge , r -- \ - A/,;, Semi-evergreen. r '. I ,y V • , { i. Carex obnupta Upright seed heads. Slough Sedge Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 3 ft 2 ft L1. Light green leaves that ! *,'. Carex testacea develop red or orange ' Moist Sun to Part Sun 2.5 ft 2 ft highlights. Orange Sedge • Small-fpus mcited us Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 2 ft 2 ft g Small-fruited Bulrush Semi-evergreen Lake Oswego Plant List: Grasses and Sedums %�, sn o \ O EGC2C� N 47 0 N C co V Z z N aci a c U .2E aye+ o 7 E� a g t -c i, m 8 ca hA -a ea, , 2 `f d Reddish brown narrow and ,, .r .% erect(spike-like)seedheads. � Agrostis exarata Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 1 to 3 ft 1 ft Cool season bunchgrass. Spike Bentgrass Attracts wildlife,birds,and `, pollinators. , �l. �:1 L.'r 6,;, ' +: Drooping seedheads. it �';"'"JI it i ,+- Cool season bunchgrass. Prefers J T°:, eromus vulgaris 2 to 3 ft 2 ft shade.;' Dry to Moist Sun to Shade r 4 Columbia Brome Attracts wildlife,birds,and !r ./ �"` _'' pollinators. f �vE Nodding seedheads. .::4.11';45 -- Deschampsia Cool season grass. a, _ ` `�+ caespitosa Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun Ito 3 ft 2 ft -4,:':Ali`_.;er.#, ^F.-f'- Tufted Hairgrass Attracts wildlife,birds,and pollinators. „1 Upright fountain shape with yellow flowers in spring and fall. Festuca californica • Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 2 ft 2 ft Attracts wildlife,birds,and - ' --.= CaliforniaFescue - Califia pollinators. 1-., �w--- -- 7. / N, --'N. Evergreen. S` t a. S Upright fountain shape with blue- 0.,__ Festuca Idahoensis Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 3 ft 2 ft green leaves. `� Idaho Fescue Attracts wildlife and pollinators. -:, Succulent groundcover with 1'' : x� yellow flowers from spring to �, y-'„11$y - ,* .t Sedum oreganum summer. . ,s .. ,,. I.ft r Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 0.3 ft . • Tii, Oregon stonecrop Attracts pollinators. 1',•Y 1.,A" '9 • Evergreen. . � F-a F„,•1 .. ; Succulent groundcover with _ z yellow flowers in spring. a Sedum spathulifolium -s.t J`x _ Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 0.5 ft 1 ft Attracts birds and pollinators. rY -E+ — Broadleaf Stonecrop P - ,.'..�. Evergreen. s Lake Oswego Plant List: Ferns EC , 0 v o °REGO� y N 41 W C co G Zz N a) N co E E co o o E� a g t -c ., R o c a A m ocn rnz = 3 av -,-:•,'.•, . tea,. 41A: •""` ' - Delicate fronds with black �+ • stems. Prefers shade. Adiantum pedatum Moist to Wet Part Sun to Shade 2 ft 1 to 2 ft Maidenhair Fern Will go dormant in hot -:,=f: ? :w" temperatures. i.d 'a 1 �' - �. Athyrium filix femina Large delicate leaves.'e4 ` r *=� °ti`' Moist to Wet Part Sun to Shade 3 ft 1.5 ft a • ,ir•' .: Lady Fern Attracts birds. ,,4,' '' •=' Attracts birds. �'.: Blechnum t • '� Moist to Wet Part Sun to Shade 2 ft 1.5 ft j L ",;... Deer Fern Evergreen. n .. f Dryopteris arguta Attracts wildlife. ' . ` Wood Fern Moist Part Sun to Shade 3 ft 3 ft Evergreen. t ,k , .. ..`'N-'.n' • 1 `t . ..x lama Gymnocarpium Western Oak Fern Bright green triangular fronds. 4i+ ,; disjunctum Moist Part Sun to Shade 2 ft 4 ft Attracts wildlife. .., c✓1 v T. r ' ' �M r Polystichum munitum Attracts wildlife and birds. Dry to Moist Part Sun to Shade 3 ft 3 ft • _ '�` Sword Fern f � . Evergreen. 1 trci Woodwardia fimbriata Moist to Wet Part Sun to Shade 6 ft 3 ft Evergreen. 4.y+� Giant Chain Fern *4 ;;!1;;. s, . Lake Oswego Plant List: Perennials VAll O OREGO ' Deciduous varieties must not exceed 10%of planting area EE co N V 47, GS co C US Z z N •E c c £ C; o O c a .ron +. c W ii.t.‘441 ' 44 4ti ' , Blue,purple,or white flowers in Anemone oregano 0.25 ft late spring and early summer. - Moist Part Sun to Shade 0.5 to 1 ft Oregon Anemone Attracts birds and pollinators. S 4. ,—TN r . . '�V�a :+O Blue and white flowers in late �yY� spring to early summer. x • 1 Aquilegia coerulea y ' *c;_I*,ir.■.,- Colorado Blue Moist Shade 1 to 2 ft 1 ft Attracts pollinators. +' _`' • A�° Columbine �- E Plant in the fall(needs cold to germinate). •b raft', '11,r, +- !'rill Red to orange flowers in spring. joe. 4"„p+y, tn v Aquilegia formosa 1 to 2 ft Attracts pollinators. ;,v • '� + Moist Sun to Part Sun 3 ft - iv, ,4, �j!7� Red Columbine Prefers well-drained soil. ar - -N .,_ {. ;,. -:-4; tPurple flowers from Astersuspicatus { . , Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 1 to 1.5 ft 1 ft summer to fall. Attracts. Douglas Aster birds and pollinators. t1 ' : .-1Magenta to rose-colored .4 • $- Chamerion r`� augustifolium Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 1 to 6 ft 1 ft flowers from summer to fall. R Fireweed ,:_lkiltir 1 ' ' • Delphinium menziesii Purple tubular flowers in spring Dry to Wet Sun to Part Sun 1 to 2 ft 1 ft to early summer. a Menzies'Larkspur .sk Attracts birds and pollinators. - . Pink flowers spring to r Mr Dicentra formosa summer.Attracts birds and Moist Part Sun to Shade 1.5 ft 1.5 ft pollinators. Pacific Bleeding Heart Will go dormant during hot temperatures. • F�J cvs sLake Oswego Plant List: Perennialsc.„,,,,...:_) Deciduous varieties must not exceed 10%of planting area U1 G Z Z N N C U £ :; £" _ L f0 0 U 2 7 01 la t Uco crlce al 3 d0 M - Pink flowers in summer followed by edible berries. Also `' Gaultheria ovatifolia Oregon Wintergreen Moist to Wet Part Sun 0.25 ft 1 to 3 ft known as Oregon Teaberry. .0..iiir Attracts birds and pollinators. Evergreen. r • 4-,} f. r .r ems ; .` - ; r 1 �i - . Gentianaparryii A'.,y ,; !r Moist to Wet Sun 1 to 2 ft 1 ft Blue flowers in summer. } Mountain Gentian -r 4• r- •, Hydrophyllum teniupes liaiMoist Sun to Shade 1 to 3 ft 1 ft flowers in early summer. ... White to lavender bell-shaped . • ' Rf. Pacific Waterleaf a4 li : ' y' , 7,. \F , _ -- Iris tenax Purple flowers in spring. 1• ;';e tlt Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 1 ft 1.5 ft t{ t Oregon Iris Attracts birds. ram: \ f i Lupinus polyphyllus Purplish blue flowers in summer. Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 3 ft 2 ft Large-Leaved Lupine Attracts birds and pollinators. - 4. :'true k- ,1 f_ - A g' ` �-- Lavender flowers late ..xkE - -. .� - Liriope spicata ti•.:. Moderate to Dry Sun to Part Shade Ito 2 ft 1 to 2 ft i,• Creeping Lilyturf summer.Goundcover, l:;�. -: . f 7r speading. r Fragrant creamy white panicle _.. - - Maianthemum of flowers in early summer -. -• racemosa followed by red berries. Moist Part Sun to Shade 1 to 3 ft 1.5 ft r"' A- t 4 Western False Attracts wildlife and birds. Solomon's Seal Slow growth. OOct-g. 2LLake Oswego Plant List: Perennials 1oc„.„,„...EG�� Deciduous varieties must not exceed 10%of planting area 0 Q., co ., V Z Z c N c c) £ r; o!c £.a.) N .c .c a-, tE O c a c co r 1 7 . "w , ','.4 Yellow tubular flowers in ? - Mimulus guttatus '°sr.* 1 ��) Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 0.5 to 2.5 ft 0.5 ft summer. }..,.r_ Common Monkeyflower ., R y Attracts birds and pollinators. F i�' Y 3 I ,d a r `_ �r+' .. Blue flower with white center in • ' Nemophila menziesii spring and early summer. r rAm, Baby Blue Eyes Moist Sun to Part Sun 0.5 to 1 ft 0.25 ft .}M Attracts pollinators. yj r Yellow flowers in summer. ay:I�� J Attracts birds and 4 R• - .. Hypoxis hirsuta Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 1 ft 1.5 ft ' Yellow Star Grass pollinators.Needs well- drained soil.+ "' tY.q Purple flowers in summer. 0. .1.i ,+ , 4 ; Penstemon serrulatus Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun Ito 2 ft 1 ft Attracts birds and pollinators. •• - • Cascade Penstemon i , Semi-evergreen. • t. - , .1; Sagittaria latifolia White flowers in summer to .%, Wapato Wet Sun to Part Sun 1 to 3 ft 1 ft early fall.TN • Sidalcea cusickii• Rosy pink flowers in summer « Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 2 to 5 ft 1 ft that deepen in color as they age. '. Cusick's Checkermallow Attracts pollinators. w do Viola sempervirens Yellow flowers in spring. Evergreen Violet Moist to Wet Part Sun to Shade 0.35 ft 0.25 ft Evergreen. s Lake Oswego Plant List: Medium to Small Shrubs , o \ O EGOS y N 0 co C co V CO N a) CI) c U E E O 4_- 3 i U 7N 'O N lat c.)co (z x 3 ace +c � :f Small pink-white flowers ;,° - ` „t Ceanothus velutinus V ti Dry to Moist Sun 2 to 6 ft 3 ft and white berries. Snow Brush { Attracts birds. .,..4'A- - Evergreen. a _:• Pink flowers in spring followed by y ► - - blue-black berries in the fall. Gaultheria shallon Dry to Moist Part Sun to Shade 1 to 3 ft 3 to 4 ft Grows taller in shade. •' !`� at • Salal �,.' y• . ;-, ,--; Attracts birds and pollinators. '�.','; r Evergreen. 1 A� r. F .' y tip, ' i ,., i 4 Yellow flowers in spring followed "`■ b edible fruit. Bronze fall color . Ya?"" 4 .. Y: Mahonia aquifolium Y `;' Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 4 to 6 ft 4 ft � � Tall Oregon Grape Attracts birds and pollinators. r * ! } m mot^' Evergreen. I --- ,,• ,. . Yellow flowers in spring followed -►01, • by blue fruit. y .:. Mahonia nervosa - : - ti Dull Oregon Grape Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 2 ft 2 ft Attracts wildlife and birds. •Lit � ._ Evergreen Fa ,e t Fragrant white flowers in late y spring to midsummer. Philadelphus lewisii Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 5 to 7 ft 3 to 5 ft Attracts birds and pollinators. 4...,„:„ Mock Orange . ', Prefers well-drained soil. Reddish pink flowers in early spring '-i: M1 :; n`,'. followed by edible bluish black * ' Ribes sanguFlowering neum Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 4 to 8 ft 7 ft berries in fall. ~ s,, ` ,.."' +i Red Flowering Current Attracts birds and pollinators. ~ +;� ��1't r; • • Prefers well-drained soil. a7.r::-.7- -eV.:•� `71y`-cZ•4i' Pale pink fragrant flowers in • f ;; Rosa Gymnocarpa 3 ft summer with orange-red rose hips Moist to Wet Sun to Shade 3 to 5 ft in the fall. t. p sh` / jet- Baldhip Rose ' ''�•'. Soft spines(no thorns). (--k-..,, A FcsLake Oswego Plant List: Medium to Small Shrubs , .) iAl I.1 I lil lij__. o \ O EGOC� E E CD cL) C co co G o Zz N a) N c c) 2 E .: o o 2 4.E c N •5 t 4, 2 o c cr A •. Rva 0ci rote = 3 av _ .may_ ' ? Fragrant flowers in late spring to A ! s �. --y._�'�c� 2' midsummer with large scarlet rose I.'" -, • °;, Rosa nutkana Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 5 to 7 ft 4 to 5 ft hips in the fall. ` c ' Nootka Rose Attracts birds and pollinators. k:. :4 Curved thorns. { .. White flowers in spring followed by pinkish red fruit in the summer. •• w.- Rubus parviflorus Moist to Wet Part Sun to Shade 5 ft 5 ft Large soft leaves. � _ ,„' Thimbleberry Attracts wildlife,birds,and t pollinators. • ! d` 0. Magenta flowers in the spring Rubus spectabilis followed by an orange-red fruit in Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 6 to 8 ft 8 ft the summer. �t'� " :1 Salmonberry Attracts wildlife,birds,and :�► . : ; ., pollinators. • I li Upright pyramidal dark pink -*-`.- `- flower in summer. Shrub shape is `_,A;,t. Spiraea douglasii p ti Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 4 to 5 ft 4 to 6 ft more compact in the sun. Douglas Spires .Y. - :- t Attracts birds and pollinators. ,'e,=;: Pink bell-shaped flowers in late x: e. ="r=.;` spring to summer followed by f edible dark blue berries in the fall. �, :.:;. Vaccinum ovatum Slow growth. '.t . 1; Dry to Moist Sun to Shade 3 to 6 ft 3 ft 81, y L T-` Evergreen Huckleberry Attracts wildlife,birds,and �:r y;T, .E, pollinators. �, a ,';' ... -"i��LT:r . !;x'ti•. Evergreen. ,, ter...--.Vil ' ` Yellow or pink flowers in spring '"+'- .t' - • followed by red tart berries in the :,-+',"."-• -1 Vaccinum parvifolwm fall. ; Dry to Moist Part Sun to Shade 3 to 6 ft 4 ft % _T - Red Huckleberry Attracts wildlife,birds,and I. �:, . r,:.'� pollinators. s':.b -a+. ate -' - • White flowers in late spring or Viburnam edule early summer followed by red -"AI ' Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 6 ft 4 ft edible berries. Red fall color. Highbush Cranberry Attracts wildlife,birds,and pollinators. OO� F�JtL Lake Oswego Plant List: Small Trees or Large Shrubs I 0 v , o OREGO� H 47, 2 c'nCC = 3 cio irk ' ' Multiple-stemmed tree in sunny r areas. Grows as a vining shrub in '— , - ,-' -\ _.. . Acer circinatum Moist to Wet Part Sun to Shade 15 ft 10 ft shady areas. y _ Vine Maple Red-orange fall color. Y "'• Attracts wildlife and birds. s- ■ Iy White flowers in early spring "'•r Amelanchier alnifolia followed by edible black fruit. Itor ! 7 Dry to Wet Sun to Part Sun 10 to 18 ft 10 ft ; Serviceberry Attracts birds and pollinators. AL ,�.�.. " ' Pink flowers in early summer. - Reddish flaky bark for winter •(.. Arctostaphylos interest. 4,; columbiana Dry to Moist Sun 10 ft 10 ft Hairy Manzanita Attracts birds and pollinators. a, s ti Evergreen. Fragrant blue flowers in spring and ... r. , - fall. . Ceanothus thyrsiflorus :..: _ .r_�- , Dry Sun 15 ft 6 to 8 ft Attracts birds and pollinators. rli- 'P- Blue Blossom Evergreen. -- Jx "� Large white to pink blooms in Cornus nuttallii Moist to Wet Part Sun to Shade 20 ft 10 ft spring. Orange to purple fall color. .a:rr6',, Pacific Dogwood WI 'A ' White flowers in late spring. Blue CQ 4 "`- inedible fruit in summer. = M Cornus sericea Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 8 to 10 ft 6 to 8 ft Red bark in sunny areas. -:-�_L ; - Red-Osier Dogwood Attracts birds and pollinators. - ... I I - . ' -,vf.:,:',`. - � Edible nuts. Yellow leaves in fall. -t IL,. Corylus cornuta Dry to Moist Part Sun 12 ft 12 ft Attracts wildlife. "it`.'. Beaked Hazelnut ..-• 1'; i- c [, Prefers well drained soil. 5` i dilr S Of: F�JtL Lake Oswego Plant List: Small Trees or Large Shrubs I-, 0 v o OREGO� E USN c.) ZGS z N N c U £ +r., cao Et N -3 .c .c .- R o c a -a c 0 ., Euonymus occidentalis Red and ellow fall color. ,. .r-;�' Western Wahoo Moist Part Sun to Shade 10 to 15 ft 10 ft Y I_ White to cream flowers in late _a: spring to late sumer.Flowers t turn light brown and stay on - .:. - Holodiscus discolor n,s+ r? - Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 10 ft 6 ft plant through winter. - w_ Oceanspray '-,y Vase-shaped. ;k_ Attracts birds and pollinators. _ e ` . Yellow flowers in spring and Lonicera involucrata summer.Paired inedible black y Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 10 to 12 ft 7 ft berries. Black Twinberry 0, Attracts birds and pollinators. .. _ Fragrant pinkish white flowers in spring.Edible tart apples and •: —: -- - Malus Fusco orange-red color in fall. .: Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 10 to 30 ft 15 ft Pacific crabapple Attracts wildlife,birds,and let pollinators. t'. r - i', `-y. 0 ,:s;*�4 White flowers in early spring..,:!':qf �' Bluish-black plum-shaped fruit in 4 .-*K' Oemleria cerasiformis r • - r Dry to Moist Part Sun to Shade 10 ft 5 ft fall. • Indian Plum ;•- ��! ` . . �`_-.;--. Attracts wildlife and birds •.. .:-..-ems. -. g":.7 White flowers in late spring. Red x 'l =;s ' -'•- L' '• Physocarpus capitatus seed clusters in summer and fall. r y . �t � Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 30 to 12 ft 5 to 8 ft Shredded bark for winter interest. :' •., ' Pacific Ninebark ti � ; kYYr�� ;,� .a� t�... Attracts birds and pollinators. R 3 - Fragrant white flowers in spring - +" followed by inedible red cherries Prunus nata which are favored by cedar '�y • Bitter Cherryherry Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 20 ft 15 ft waxwings. Attracts wildlife,birds,and pollinators. ��A E � O s� Lake Oswego Plant List: Small Trees or Large Shrubs t rl V �� O O EGGS M E co V X. CS co C Z z N CO) c U £ +0 oo £47 N .c .c ++ fQ o ca to cR 0(n i = 3 Y0 -- 4r w.-.., -, White flowers in spring followed Prunus virginiana by edible tart cherries in s.-:'�' '►fir ". Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 15 ft 12 ft summer. *r--_ - Common Chokecherry r"r "- Attracts wildlife,birds,and .A. pollinators. `4r: .I Rhamnus purshiana Shrub or small tree depending on e1 e� Moist Sun to Part Sun 20 ft 15 ft r , r �j�- j- Cascara the conditions. Yellow fall color. 1 ~'�*' Dome-shaped white flowers :44,* . Sambucus caerulea followed by edible blue berries. Blue Elderberry Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 15 ft 15 ft Attracts wildlife,birds,and ' i !. ' pollinators. (,' `y-- '. - `_•-..-1 i Fragrant white flowers and red ,fir A1� ' _ Sambucus racemosa berries. r Dry to Wet Sun to Shade 15 ft 15 ft Red Elderberry Attracts wildlife,birds,and :• pollinators. -ALT etli -:= White flowers in early summer. ` .,*•::�:, Sorbus sitchensis Tart red fruit in fall. t:. __. Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 10 to 12 ft 5 ft ` Sitka Mountain Ash -',T, ` Attracts wildlife and birds. l;� Slow growth. Cited height is at 10 , •. . =,;* years. It can reach 40 ft. N 4 '' - Taxus brevifolia A� _ . :. ..,- rt Moist to Wet Sun to Shade 10 ft 10 ft Pacific Yew Attracts birds. w =. Evergreen. I. _ • •c ;' ; � � Small white flowers in spring �'- ;, with black plum fruit in fall. Red �; Viburnam davidii i David Viburnam Dry to Moist Sun to Shade 10 ft 8 ft fall foliage. ''r'', Attracts wildlife,birds,and ° ._ t A pollinators. O` F J2L Lake Oswego Plant List: Large Trees 0 v ,, o OREGO� Ilmilli Z z N N C U E ., O K i G -3 .c a-, i C a C R W t°�cn in x 3 a(I . Alnus rubra Moist Sun to Part Sun 45 ft 45 ft Attracts wildlife and birds. t Red Alder 101411, st Fragrant white flowers in spring followed by red fruit in the fall. Attracts wildlife and birds. .', Arbutus menziesii ` Dry to Moist Sun to Part Sun 30 to 70 ft 20 to 30 ft • w .. .�' Pacific Madrone Peeling bark. Needs good drainage. Slow growth. • Ever:reen. Not recommended for areas near eetula papyrifera patios or parking areas. �°' Moist Sun to Part Sun 60 ft 20 ft ti Paper Birch Peeling bark. Attracts wildlife and pollinators. 1_,,,,, , 1 r'}:: . ._,_. , . .....,,. .4.d, `: , Fraxinus lati olio Attracts wildlife,birds,and f,.�� r" �� f Moist to Wet Sun to Part Sun 70 ft 25 ft �' . ' ' Oregon Ash pollinators. T•t t. ....sec ,..i, 1111 I t' Fragrant textured bark. Pinus Ponderosa Ponderosa Pine Dry to Moist Sun 50 ft 20 ft Attracts wildlife and birds. %�> Evergreen. r. \` Graceful delicate needles. y,;w,, l _ Tsuga heterophylla Dry to Moist Sun to Shade 120 to 200 ft 35 ft ir Western Hemlock Attracts wildlife and birds. • — Evergreen. • Fragrant needles. i= � Thuja plicata Moist to Wet Sun to Shade 100 to 200 ft 30 ft Attracts wildlife and birds. _ Western Red Cedar -% �- Evergreen. • I I Appendix H-2 Approved Seed Mixes Source: City of Portland BES Stormwater Management Manual, 2004 LO SWMM 2020 Update SEED SPECIFICATIONS FOR STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MANUAL Species listed below should only be used in the listed moisture regime for optimal success Sow rates for small seeded mixes shall contain a minimum of 20lbs/per acre in combination for stormwater management facilities and 30 lbslacre for erosion control purposes Sow rates for largelmedium seeded mixes should contain a minimum of 25 lbs per acre in combnation for stormwater management facilities and 40 pounds per acre for erosion control purposes. Matrix cr to Swale or Ymd Optimal Sow add sow Rate Erosim Control sow Cormnn name Scientific Name Season diversity (Hard) Rate Moisture Exposue seed size Commercial accessibhtyot local eco-type Grasses Amencan sloughgrass Beckmannia syxigachne falllspnng D 2 lhsfac NR inundated to wet sun medium easy to medi um,Willamette Valley Blue wldr a Elam us glaucus early fall/spring M 25 Ibsen 4011:is/acre xenc to mesic sun to shade lance easy,P ortland Metro California brome Bromus carinatus early fa II/Spring M 25 Ibsen40lhs/acre xenc to mesic sun large easy ortland Metro California oatgrass Danthonia califomica falllspnng M 30 Ibsen NR sun large easy tom edi um,Wiliam ette Valley Columbia brome Bromus vulgar's falllsyyrinq D 5 lhsfac NR xenc to mesic shade lance m ediun.P ortland Metro Junepprass Koelena macrantha fallrpnng M 20 Ibsen NR xenc to mesic sun small easy tom edium,P DX orWillamette Valley Meadowbarley Hordeum brachyantheru early fall/spring M 25 Ibs1ac 40 lbs/acre wet to mesc sun large easy tom edi um,Willamette Valley Pine bluegrass Poa secunda R ice culggrass Leersia oryzoides fall/spring D 5 lbslac NR inundated to wet sun medium medium to difficult P ortland Metro Roemefs fescue Festuca icemen falllspring D 2 lbslac NR xenc to mesic sun small difficult,Wiliamette'Valley 5itka brome Bromus srtchen as early fall/spring M 25 Ibsen 40 lbs/acre wet to mesic sun/shade large ea sy,Wiliam ette Valley Slender hairo0.vass Deschampsia elonpata early fall/spring M 20 Ibs1ac 30 lbs/acre wet to xenc sun small easy/P ortland Metro Slender wheafgrass Elym ustrachycaufus early fall/spring M 25 Ibsen 401bs/acre xenc to mesic sun large m edium to difficult,Willa mette Valley Spike bentgrass Agrostis exarata early fall/spring D 5 lbslac 30 lbs/acre o turated to wet sun small easy tom edium,P ortland Metro Tall mann5grass Glyceria elata fall/spring D 2 lbslac NR oturated to mesic shade small m edium to difficult P ortland Metro Tutted hairgrass Deschampsia cespprtos fall/spring D 2 lbslac NR o turated to wet sun small ea sy,Willam ette Valley Water fo#ail Nopecuris geniculatus fall/spring M 25 Ibsen NR inundated to wet sun medium easy,P DX or Willamette Valley Western fescue Festuca occidental's fall/spring M 20 Ibsen NR xenc to mesic sun small medium to difficult Willamette Valley Western m annagrass Glycena occidental's falllspnng M 25 Ibsen NR oturated to wet sun medium easy to medi um,Wiliam ette Valley Sedges,I Rashes•son moisture as indicated into summer months Carex o4nupta Slough sedge falllspnng D 2 lbslac NR inundated to m esic sun/shade medium medium to difficult,P DX Carex scogaria Pointed broom sedge falllsyyrinq D 2 lbslac NR wet to mesic sun medium medium to difficult P DX Carex stipala Save eak sed Re fallrpnng D 2 lbslac NR inundated to m esic sun medium medium Wlllam ette Valle Eleocharis ovata Ovate spikerush falllspnng D 1 Vac NR inundated to wet sun small easy,PD�l or Willamette Valley Eleocharis palustns Creeping sppikerush falllspnng D 2 lbslac NR inundated to wet sun small easy to medi um,Wiliam ette Valley Juncos acuminates Taperfip nus}i falllspnng D 0 25 ibslac NR inundated to wet sun small medium Willamette Valley,PDX Juncos bufonius Toad rush falllspnng D 025 lbslac NR wet to mesic sun small medium Wiliam ette Valley Juncos patens Spreading hash fall/spring D 050 iblac NR wet to mesic sun/shade small easy,PDX Forts Achillea millefolium Western Yarrow fall D 025 lbslac NR wet to mesic sun medium easy PD X or Willamette Valley Aquilegia formosa Western Columbine fall D 101biac NR wet to mesic sun medium easy to medi um,Willamette Valley A)isma media Water plantain falllspnng D 1 0 lblac NR inundated to wet sun medium easy to medi um,Willamette Valley Collomia gqnandiflora Large flowered mllomia falllspr'p D 50 lbslac NR xenc to mesic sun small medium to difficult Willamette Valley Collins a rattan" Blue eyed m ary falllspnng D 25 lbslac NR xenc to mesic sun small medium to difficult Willamette Valley Epi lob ium densiflora Dense spike primrose fall D 101b/ac NR wet to mesic sun small medium,Willamette Valley EnophNlum lanatum Wooly sunshine fall D 1 0 lblac NR wet to mesic sun medium easy to medi um Willamette Valley h Gia capitata Blue giha falllspnng D 2 lbs/acre 1 Iblac(vie xenc to mesic sun medium m edium,Wiliam ette Valley Lotus purshianus Spanish clover fall D 2 lbs/acre 1 Iblac(vie xenc to mesic sun medium medium,Wiliam ette Valley Linus albicaul is Sickle keel lupine fall D 1 Vac 1 lblacfwd xenc to mesic sun large medium,Willamette Valley Instenax Oregon Iris fall D 2 lbslac N xenc to mesic sun IarRe easyto medium Willamette Valley Camassia quam ash Comm on camas fall D 1 Vac NR wet to mesic sun medium ea sy lunation�lV'llam ette Valley Camassia quam ash varGreat camas fall D 1 Vac NR wet to mesic sun medium easy tom edi um,Willamette Valley Lunnus micranthus Small flowered lupine fall D 1 Vac NR xenc to mesic sun medium medium to difficult Willamette Valley Ranunculus occidental Western buttercup fall D 1 Vac NR xenc to mesic sun medium medium to difficult Willamette Valley Sidalcea cam pestns Checker mallow fall D 1 Vac NR xenc to mesic sun large medium to difficult,Willamette Valley Lyyppmus rivularis Stream'wine fall D 1 ibfac 1 lblac(vie xenc to mesic sun farce medium Wlllam ette Valley Plagiobothrys figurat1A opccrn flower falllspung D 10lblac NR inundated to wet sun small mediumo dlifio-ttt,Willamette Valley Prunella vulgar'svar f,Self heal falllspnng D 2 lbslac 1 lblac(vie wet to mesic sun/shade medium easy to medi um,P DX orWillamette Valley Solidago canadensis Goldenrod fall D 050lbslac NR xenc to mesic sun small easy to medium.P DX orWillamette Valley Recommended Non•pletive Cover Crop Species Festuca rubra var corn Chewngs fescue year round M 20 ibsrac 30-40 pia Triticum spp l/yhe at year round M 50ibsuac 60 nla Avena spp Oats year round M 50ibsuac 60 nla Regreen Sterile wheat h4brid year round M 40ibsuac 50 pia Agropyron spp Wheatgrass year round M 30 Ids/acre 40 A trachycaulus(W V source) Nuisance Grass Species not recommended for use on Erosion Control or stormwater Project; Species COMMON name State Liste I Noxious Weed? 4 ropyron repens Quachgrass yes(B-list) Nuio nce i Portland Plant List P io ecuris pratensis Mead ow tidal' no Nuioance List Portland Plant List P nfhoxanthum odoratu Sweet ve mal grass no Nuio nce List Portland Plant List P rrhenatherum elatius Tall oatgrass no Nuio nce List Portland Plant List Brachypodium sylvahc False brom e yes(B-list) Nuio nce List Portland Plant List Brom u s diandrus Ripqul no Nuioance List Portland Plant List Bromushord ace us Smooth brome no Nuioance List Portland Plant List Bromusinermis Smooth brome no Nuioance List Portland Plant List Bromus!won'cus Japanese drone no Nuioance List Portland Plant List Bromussfer'I's Poverty grass no Nuioance List Portland Plant List Brom u stectorum Cheatgrass no Nuioance List Portland Plant List Festuca arundinacea Tall fescue no Nuioance List Portland Plant List Holcus lanatus Velvet grass no Nuio nce List Portland Plant List Lolium muiIi orum Annual ryegrass no Nuioance List Portland Plant List Phalan arundnacea Reed canary grass no Nuioance List Portland Plant List Phalan a uatica Harding grass no Nuioance List Portland Plant List Phleum pray ensis Timothy no Nuio nce List Portland Plant List Phragmrtes austral is Comm on reed no Nuioance List Portland Plant List Vul pia myoros Rat-tailed fescue no Nuio nce List Portland Plant List Stormwater Management Manual Page F-14 Adopted July 1, 1999, revised September 2004 Appendix I Erosion Prevention and Sediment Control Plan Information Erosion Prevention and Sediment Control General Notes — I-1 Erosion Prevention and Sediment Control Permit Application — 1-2 LO SWMM 2020 Update Appendix I - 1 Erosion Prevention and Sediment Control General Notes LO SWMM 2020 Update CITY OF LAKE OSWEGO Building Permit No. o Erosion Prevention and Sediment Control General Notes Address \ 0REGQI See the Erosion Prevention and Sediment Control Planning and Design Manual for requirements. ❑ Cover stockpiles with plastic sheeting during wet weather season. From October 1st through May 31st„the wet weather erosion prevention measures are in effect. During the wet weather season, all stockpiles shall be covered with plastic sheeting and protected with perimeter control at the toe of slope. Cover/stabilize stockpiles in summer season when unworked for 14-days, or immediately upon inspection of wind erosion. ❑ Protect exposed soils with an adequate ground cover during wet weather season. Mulch, straw, compost, wood chips, and plastic sheeting are examples of acceptable ground cover. Temporarily cover exposed soils at the end of each day during wet weather season. Stabilize exposed soils in summer season and protect from wind erosion. ❑ Provide leak-proof pans for concrete rinse water and mortar and masonry materials. Concrete wash-out,tile saw, and mortar slurry must be contained in leak-proof pans and properly disposed of. No ground or"pit" dumping allowed. ❑ Provide adequate,well-marked garbage containers. Garbage and debris, including litter,food wrappers, construction scraps, and material packaging must be collected and contained in secured garbage containers. ❑ Install stabilized clean rock construction entrance. Construction entrance shall be installed at the beginning of the project and maintained throughout the project. Single family residential construction entrance to be minimum 20' length, 1%z" diameter clean rock, 8" depth. Commercial or development construction entrance to be minimum 50' length, 4"—6" diameter clean rock, 8" depth. ❑ Maintain clean and sediment free construction entrance (including the existing driveway). Do not rinse or power wash sediment onto the street or into storm inlets. Dry sweep/vacuum sweep any tracking on street surfaces at the end of each work day. ❑ Provide storm drain inlet protection. All catch basins and area drains that have the potential to receive runoff from the construction site must be protected until pavement surfacing is completed or site is stabilized. ❑ Clean all catch basins and conveyance lines prior to paving. The cleaning operations shall not flush sediment- laden water into the storm water drainage system. ❑ Install temporary paved or graveled area for construction parking. Do not block the construction entrance with trailers or material storage. Restore areas utilized for temporary parking to pre-construction conditions, or better. ❑ Provide plywood or steel sheeting construction pathways. Load and unload materials on the jobsite, not in the street. Even small "bobcat" style equipment can cause soil disturbance. Install wood or steel sheeting on construction pathways to minimize soil disturbance and damage to existing root systems. ❑ Designate location to store and stage construction materials. Storage locations should be constructed on gravel, plywood, pavement, or another hard surface. Compost, bark-dust,topsoil, or other amendments should be stored on tarps. Phase material delivery to provide adequate and safe workspace for construction crew. ❑ Provide a spill kit on site.A spill kit is required to prevent hazardous or harmful substances from entering the ground or surface waters after a spill. Crews must be trained on the location and use of the kit. ❑ Mark the boundaries of the clearing limits in the field prior to construction. Construction limits shown on the plan shall be clearly flagged in the field prior to construction. Land disturbance is not allowed beyond flagging. GENERAL NOTES CONTINUED ON REVERSE Erosion Prevention and Sediment Control General Notes (continued) ❑ Owner or designated person shall be responsible for proper installation and maintenance of all erosion and sediment control measures. Designee shall maintain compliance with water quality requirements in accordance with LOC Chapter 52, State, and Federal regulations. ❑ Implementation of the Erosion and Sediment Control (ESC) plan, maintenance, replacement, and upgrading of ESC measures is the responsibility of the General Contractor until all construction is completed,the site has been stabilized, and approved by the City Manager or his designee. ❑ All erosion control measures shall comply with specifications provided in the "Erosion Prevention and Sediment Control Planning and Design Manual" (Revised December 2008), available at htto://www.clackamas.us/wes/designmanual.html ❑ ESC measures shown on this plan must be installed prior to any clearing or grading activities. Installation shall be completed in such a manner as to ensure that sediment and sediment laden water does not enter the storm water drainage system, roadways, or violate applicable water quality standards. ❑ ESC measures shown on the plan are minimum requirements for anticipated site conditions. As construction progresses, erosion control measures shall be updated to ensure that sediment and sediment-laden water does not leave the construction site. ❑ During active construction, ESC measures shall be inspected daily by an Erosion Control Plan Manager(specifically designated by the owner or contractor). ESC measures are to be maintained as necessary to ensure their continued effectiveness. During inactive periods, the ESC measures shall be inspected every 2 weeks or within 24 hours following a rain event of%z" or greater. ❑ Stay familiar with current erosion prevention and sediment control requirements. Owner and General Contractor are responsible for knowing and following local, state, and federal requirements. Most local regulations are mandated by the Federal Clean Water Act; the city does not have authority to waive these requirements. ❑ Protect existing vegetation and limit soil disturbance. Stabilize exposed soils as quickly as possible. Consider the use of deep-rooted native vegetation to stabilize exposed soils. ❑ Locate the nearest storm drain inlets. Protect inlets with non-woven filter inserts. Properly dispose of any material that accumulates in the filter. Remove all filters upon permanent site stabilization. ❑ Do not rinse any material into the storm drain. Remember: "Only rain goes down the drain!" ❑ All dewatering discharges will be treated using a discharge inline filter in addition to inlet protection. Unfiltered dewatering discharge cannot be disposed of in the storm system. ❑ Public streets will be swept daily, if necessary, to minimize sediment discharged into the storm water drainage system. Unfiltered wash water cannot be discharged to the storm system. Appendix 1 -2 Erosion Prevention and Sediment Control Application LO SWMM 2020 Update 7 E. CITY OF LAKE OSWEGO Building Permit No. `'s��' n Erosion Prevention and Sediment Control r..J D Demo/Other Permit No. viii~ Permit Application .REGQI Payment of erosion control permit fee is required before building permit can be issued SITE LOCATION Construction site address GENERAL CONTRACTOR Name Address Company Phone I Email OWNER/APPLICANT Name Address Company Phone I Email 24-HOUR EMERGENCY CONTACT Name Address Company Phone I Email SITE INFORMATION Lot size(SF) Area of land disturbance (SF) Approximate start date Approximate end date Soil disposal (onsite/off site) Location of soil disposal and estimated quantity(if off-site) Waterfront property(Y/N) Name(if yes) Estimated quantity(CY) Project Description (including construction phasing, if applicable) REQUIRED Check all that apply ❑ Demolition ❑ New Single Family Residential ❑ Commercial/Industrial ❑ Other • Erosion control measures MUST BE IN PLACE prior to any construction activity. Complete checklist on reverse and provide signature. All items within the checklist must be clearly identified on the erosion control plan sheet. Applications with a partial checklist or without signature will be considered incomplete and returned to the owner/applicant. Lake Oswego erosion and sediment control details can be found at: http://www.ci.oswego.or.us/standard-details Clackamas County erosion and sediment control details can at: http://www.clackamas.us/wes/designmanual.html Erosion control questions can be directed to the City Erosion Control Inspector at 503-675-3991. EROSION PREVENTION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL PLAN CHECK LIST EROSION PREVENTION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL PLAN REQUIREMENTS Y N/A Minimum 11"x 17" size paper with all text size 1/8" in height, or larger ❑ Property boundary, North arrow, Bar scale ❑ Existing and proposed contours, labeled at no greater than 5' intervals ❑ Existing and proposed structures ❑ (Structures include,but not limited to:house,shed,garage,pool,spa,patio,sport court,gazebo,retaining wall,boat dock,etc.) Site access/equipment access ❑ Construction site boundary, and any surface waters(lake,canal,stream,wetland,etc.) ❑ Limits of soil disturbance ❑ Construction entrance (Single family residential construction entrance to be minimum 20'length,1'/,"diameter(min)clean rock,8"depth) ❑ (Commercial or development construction entrance to be minimum 50'length,4"—6"diameter clean rock,8"depth) Staging/material storage area(s) ❑ Soil stockpile(s) (appropriately scaled on drawing) ❑ ❑ Existing vegetation to remain ❑ ❑ Temporary ground cover(mulch,straw,wood chips,rock,plastic sheeting,etc.) ❑ Perimeter erosion control (straw wattles,silt fence,sediment basin,berms,silt curtain,etc.) ❑ Internal erosion control (erosion control matting,sediment basins,temporary seeding,etc.) ❑ ❑ Storm drain inlet protection ❑ ❑ Leak proof concrete wash-out pans and leak proof garbage containers ❑ Stormwater facilities and surface water features (rain garden,flow through planter,dry well,etc.) ❑ ❑ (All stormwater facilities must be adequately protected from compaction/construction traffic.) Construction vehicle parking(provide clean rock to unimproved parking areas) ❑ ❑ Notes/narrative indicating how exposed soils will be permanently stabilized ❑ Notes/narrative stating that routine inspections of erosion control structures will occur and that ❑ maintenance or replacement of failed structures will occur when necessary Notes/narrative stating erosion control inspections are required before grading/clearing begins, and ❑ before footings are placed Details and notes necessary for proper installation and maintenance of all erosion and sediment control ❑ structures "The permit or approval granted hereby,or any inspections conducted on the site hereafter,shall not be construed as authorizing any activity in violation of any applicable federal or state law or regulation, including but not limited to the federal Endangered Species Act and its regulations." Owner/Applicant Signature Date Appendix J Source Control LO SWMM 2020 Update Source Control Note: Content from this chapter was adapted from Seattle Director's Rules(Seattle Public Utilities 2009a). Overview Water quality treatment BMPs described in Chapter 4 remove pollutants after they have entered stormwater. They are typically more expensive and often cannot remove 100 percent of the pollutants. The City's MS4 permit requires that the City prevent illicit discharges and reduce pollutants from industrial and commercial facilities. The use of source control BMPs is the first line of defense in stormwater pollution prevention for several reasons, including: • In most cases, source control BMPs are sufficient to correct stormwater pollution problems. • Most source control BMPs are relatively inexpensive and easy to implement. The source control BMPs included in this chapter include both required BMPs to comply with the City stormwater code and the City's MS4 permit, and recommended BMPs. Source control BMPs prevents contaminants from entering stormwater runoff and the surface water utility by controlling them at their source. Source control BMPs are options that prevent or reduce stormwater contamination with or without the aid of permanent structures. They can include process changes, such as changes in raw material and products, and the recycling of wastes. Many source control BMPs are common sense housekeeping practices; for example, dust and debris can be swept or vacuumed from a work area and put into the garbage instead of being washed with a hose into a storm drain or other drainage conveyance. Examples of source control BMPs include: • Implementing good housekeeping practices • Implementing preventive maintenance procedures • Writing and implementing a spill plan (SWPPP or procedural BMPs) • Covering materials • Isolating pollutant sources to prevent uncontaminated stormwater from flowing onto those areas and becoming a source of contamination • Moving pollution-generating activities inside or under a covered area • Using a berm or deflector curb to keep contaminated water from entering the surface water management system • Erecting a permanent roof or structure over storage and working areas • Installing a wash pad that is connected to the sanitary sewer Table D.1 lists source control activities that can be used by residents, all types of commercial businesses, institutions, and land uses in Lake Oswego. G) co v > v v r a cD 0 m -0 C) -0 W W v r 3 -0 D ni 0 a) Q o 0 Q ( v a v oo v o o v _. Q s Do o - a C) o - (-D v v a . < 3 a s v 0 CD (D o 3 u < v cn v m y �' 0 =.• o u) . m cn C) v m •< j 0 v 0 Er) - v 0 °o < -, Q o 2 CD -� o a C) o m m cn v - FA 5. Q CD 0 • • • • • Eliminate illicit connections to storm drains ow 0 • • • • • Perform routine maintenance for drainageCD systems and stormwater facilities 0 0 0 • • • • Dust control o Cl) • • • • • • • • • Proper storage of solid wastes su (D • • • • • • • • • • Proper disposal of fluids and wastes c0 u) • • • • • • • • • • Spill prevention and cleanup • • • • Landscaping, lawn and vegetation management Painting, finishing, and coating of vehicles, • • • boats, buildings, and equipment • • • • • Parking lot maintenance and storage of vehicles and equipment • • • • • Fueling at dedicated stations • • • • • Vehicle repair and maintenance • • Swimming pool and spa maintenance • • • • • Vehicle, equipment, and building washing • • • Outdoor storage or transfer of solid raw materials, byproducts, or finished products Eliminate Illicit Connections to Storm Drains Some properties and residences have internal building drains, sump overflows, process wastewater discharges, and even sanitary sewer and septic system pipes that are incorrectly plumbed to the Lake Oswego surface water management system. These storm drain connections allow a variety of pollutants to flow directly to the surface water ultimately receiving drainage instead of to the sanitary sewer or septic system. Frequently, such connections are not intentional, but they can be very harmful to the environment and must be eliminated. All building owners or managers in Lake Oswego should examine their plumbing systems to identify any illicit connections.A good place to start is an examination of the site plans. If any toilets, sinks, appliances, showers, bathtubs, floor drains, industrial process waters, or other water-using equipment are connected to the Lake Oswego surface water management system, those connections must either be permanently plugged or disconnected, and rerouted as soon as possible. If it is not obvious through observation or examination of site plans, one method of determining where a pipe or structure drains is to perform a dye test with a nontoxic dye or a smoke test. These tests are typically best performed by qualified personnel such as a plumbing contractor. If it is found that sanitary facilities, such as toilets and sinks, are hooked up to the Lake Oswego surface water management system, a connection permit must be obtained from the City Building Department to reroute them to the sanitary sewer. Other options for correcting discharges to the drainage system include using a holding tank or installing a process treatment system. Restrictions on certain types of discharges may require pretreatment before they enter the sanitary sewer. It is the responsibility of the property owner or business operator to obtain the necessary permits and to follow through on rerouting the connection from the storm drain to the sanitary sewer. Contact the City of Lake Oswego Engineering Division if you suspect a cross-connection. Perform Routine Maintenance for Surface Water Management System Sediment and pollutants can accumulate over time in various components of drainage collection, conveyance, and treatment systems, such as catch basins, ditches, storm drains, and oil/water separators. These pollutants can include sediment and other substances such as oils, debris, and sludge. When a storm event occurs, the pollutants can become mobilized and carried into the surface water ultimately receiving drainage water. Regular maintenance of the drainage system decreases the amount of pollutants available to contaminate the stormwater. See Section 7.1.4 for a description of routine maintenance activities. Dust Control This BMP applies to residents, businesses, and public agencies that pursue dust control measures in disturbed land areas or on unpaved roadways and parking lots. All land-disturbing activity must comply with the City's erosion control code (LOC Chapter 52). Dust can result in air and water pollution, particularly at demolition sites, in disturbed land areas, and on unpaved roadways and parking lots. Chemicals applied to dust-prone areas to minimize dust production can also pollute stormwater and the surface water ultimately receiving drainage water if they are not properly selected or applied. General Recommendations Minimize dust generation and apply environmentally friendly and government- approved dust suppressant chemicals, if necessary. The use of motor oil or other oils for dust control on unpaved roadways and parking lots is prohibited. Required Best Management Practices The following BMPs or equivalent measures are required of all businesses and public agencies engaged in activities that generate dust: • Street gutters, sidewalks, driveways, and other paved surfaces in the immediate area of the demolition must be swept regularly to collect and properly dispose of loose debris and garbage. • Install catch basin filters on site and in surrounding catch basins to collect sediment and debris. Maintain the filters regularly (weekly or as needed) to prevent plugging. Remove catch basin filters when development activity is complete. • The use of oil for dust control is prohibited. Proper Storage of Solid Wastes This BMP applies to properties that store solid wastes, including food wastes and ordinary garbage, outdoors. If improperly stored in this climate, these wastes can contribute a variety of pollutants to stormwater. Pollutants of concern include toxic organic compounds; fats, oils, and greases; metals; nutrients; suspended solids; substances that increase chemical oxygen demand; and substances that increase biological oxygen demand. These pollutants must not be discharged to the drainage system or directly into receiving waters. Dangerous solid wastes must be stored and handled according to special guidelines and may require a permit. Businesses and public agencies that store dangerous wastes must follow specific regulations outlined by DEQ. For the specific requirements and permitting information, contact DEQ. General Recommendations Store wastes in suitable containers with leak-proof lids. Sweep or shovel loose solids. Educate employees about the need to check for and replace leaking containers. Consider implementing the following practices: • Store containers such that wind will not be able to knock them over. • Use waterproof liners to prevent leaks from the solid waste container. • Designate a storage area, pave the area, and slope the drainage to a holding tank or sanitary sewer drain. If a holding tank is used for storing wastewater, the contents must be pumped out before the tank is full and disposed of appropriately to a sanitary sewer or wastewater treatment system. • Compost appropriate wastes or recycle solid wastes. Required Best Management Practices The following BMPs or equivalent measures are required of all properties engaged in the storage of solid wastes: • Store solid wastes in suitable containers with leak-proof lids. Containers must be replaced if they are leaking, corroding, or otherwise deteriorating. • The waste storage area must be swept or otherwise cleaned frequently to collect all loose solids for proper disposal in a storage container. Do not hose the area to collect or clean solids. • Drain dumpsters, dumpster pads, and trash compactors to the sanitary sewer. • Use spill cleanup materials to clean up fats, oil, grease, or other contaminants. Proper Disposal of Fluids and Wastes This BMP applies to all residents, businesses, property owners, and public agencies engaged in pressure washing of non-vehicular engines, equipment, and portable objects. It also applies to businesses that clean or wash manufacturing equipment, such as saws, grinders, screens, and other processing devices, outside of buildings. General Recommendations To contain fluids and wastes generated from these activities, use of a wash pad is highly recommended. Sumps or holding tanks may be useful for storing liquid wastes temporarily. The contents must be disposed of properly. Solid and liquid wastes and contaminated stormwater must be disposed of using one of the following acceptable methods: • Recycling facilities • Municipal solid waste disposal facilities • Hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities • Sanitary sewer Required Best Management Practices The following BMPs or equivalent measures are required of all businesses engaged in cleaning or washing of tools, engines, equipment, and portable objects: • All wash water must be discharged to a sanitary sewer, process treatment system, or holding tank and must never be discharged to the surface water management utility. If a holding tank is used for the storage of wash water, the contents must be pumped out before the tank is full and disposed of appropriately to a sanitary sewer or wastewater treatment system (pretreatment and/or permit requirements may apply). • Pressure washing must be conducted in a designated area (such as a wash pad) that is provided with a sump drain connected to a sanitary sewer or treatment system, or a blind sump or holding tank. The wash area must have a means for stormwater run-on prevention (such as a berm or sump). • For wash pads that discharge directly to the sanitary sewer, the uncovered portion of the wash pad must be no larger than 200 square feet or must have an overhanging roof. This is to prevent excess stormwater from entering the sanitary sewer. A connection permit is needed to connect to the City's sanitary sewer system. For information about connection permits, call the City Building Department. Many liquid wastes and contaminated stormwater (depending on the pollutants and associated concentrations) can be discharged to the sanitary sewer system, but they are subject to approval and permitting by the wastewater treatment plant. Please contact the Lake Oswego Engineering Division for more details. If wastes cannot be legally discharged to a sanitary sewer, dangerous and hazardous wastes must be properly transported to an appropriate hazardous waste disposal, treatment, and storage facility. Spill Prevention and Cleanup Spills can contribute a variety of pollutants to the drainage system and nearby waterways and are often preventable if appropriate practices for chemical and waste handling and spill response are implemented. Promptly contain and clean up leaks and spills of solid and liquid pollutants including oils, solvents, fuels, and dust from operations on any exposed soil, vegetation, or paved area. The specific requirements for complying with this citywide BMP are described below. A spill can be a one-time event, a continuous leak, or frequent small spills. All types must be addressed. General Recommendations To reduce the potential for spills, implement the following practices and have spill cleanup kits available at activity locations where spills may occur: • Clearly label all containers that contain potential pollutants. • Store and transport liquid materials in appropriate containers with tight- fitting lids. • Place drip pans underneath all containers, fittings, and valves where materials are likely to spill or leak. • Use tarpaulins, ground cloths, or drip pans in areas where materials are mixed, carried, and applied to capture any spilled materials. • Train employees on the safe techniques for handling materials used on the site and encourage them to check for leaks and spills. Required Best Management Practices All businesses identified in Table J.1 and any other businesses or institutions that store or use chemicals shall meet the requirements identified in this section. Spill Plan Develop and implement a spill plan (spill prevention and control plan) and update it annually or whenever there is a change in activities or staff responsible for spill cleanup. Post a written summary of the plan at appropriate points in the building, such as loading docks, product storage areas, waste storage areas, and near a phone. The spill plan may be required to be posted at multiple locations. • Describe the facility including the owner's name, address, and telephone number; the nature of the facility activity; and the general types of chemicals used in the facility. • Designate spill response employees to be on the site during business activities. Provide a current list of the names, addresses, and telephone numbers (office and home) of designated spill response employee(s) who are responsible for implementing the spill plan. • Provide a site plan showing the locations of storage areas for chemicals, storm drains, and other relevant drainage or materials information. • Describe the emergency cleanup and disposal procedures. • List the names and telephone numbers of public agencies to contact in the event of a spill. • All employees must have annual training of spill control procedures. New employees must be trained upon hiring.All training must be documented. For templates and guidance on preparing spill control plans, refer to the following resources: The City operates the Watershed Hotline(503-675-3982), a call number for citizens to report http://cfpub.epa.gov/npdes/stormwater/menuofbmps/index. watershed concerns, illicit cfm?action=factsheet_results&view=specific&bmp=62&minmeasure=4 discharges, or spill activity.This hotline is advertised on the http://www.deq.state.or.us/wq/wgpermit/docs/ City's website and periodically general/12001ndSWPCPChecklist.pdf in the City's monthly newsletter "Hello LO." During normal business hours,the City's http://www.epa.gov/emergencies/docs/oil/spcc/tier1template.pdf Engineering staff answer this phone line and respond to non-emergency calls within Spill Cleanup Kit one business day. Emergency calls taken during normal Store spill cleanup kits near areas with a high potential for spills so that office hours are redirected to they are easily accessible in the event of a spill. The contents of the spill the City of Lake Oswego Fire kit must be appropriate to the types and quantities of materials stored or Department.All calls reporting a OM otherwise used at the facility and refilled when the materials are used. (503-635-0238spil are forwarded- L to LO ego - Lake Oswego Contents may include, for example: non-emergency number)for Fire • Absorbent pads Department dispatch, and all calls are initially responded to as • Sorbent booms, or socks a"Level 1 Emergency." • Absorbent granular material such as kitty litter • Protective clothing such as latex gloves and safety goggles • Thick plastic garbage bags • Drain cover Spill Cleanup and Proper Disposal of Material In the event of a spill, implement the following procedures: • Implement the spill plan immediately. • Contact the employee(s) responsible for implementing the spill plan. • Block off and seal the nearby inlet(s) to the drainage system to prevent materials from entering the drainage system. • Use an appropriate material to clean up spills. Do not use emulsifiers or dispersants such as liquid detergents or degreasers. • Immediately report to the City all spills that could reach storm drains, the sanitary sewer, streams, rivers, or Oswego Lake. • Do not wash absorbent material into interior floor drains or exterior storm drains. • Dispose of used spill control materials in accordance with the hazardous waste management guidance on DEQ's website http://www.deq.state.or.us/lq/hw/index.htm and applicable laws. Landscaping, Lawn, and Vegetation Management This BMP applies to businesses and public agencies that perform landscaping including grading, landscape materials storage piles, soil transfer, vegetation removal, pesticide and fertilizer applications, and watering. Lawn and vegetation management can include control of objectionable weeds, insects, mold, bacteria, and other pests by means of chemical pesticides and is conducted commercially at commercial, industrial, and residential sites. Examples of landscaping and lawn and vegetation management include weed control on golf courses, access roads, and utility corridors; removal of moss from rooftops; killing of nuisance rodents; application of fungicides on patio decks; and residential lawn and plant care. Stormwater contaminants from landscaping, lawn, and vegetation management activities include toxic organic compounds, metals, oils, suspended solids, pH adjusters, coliform bacteria, fertilizers, and pesticides. Pesticides such as pentachlorophenol, carbonates, and organometallics can be released to the environment as a result of leaching and dripping from treated plants, container leaks, product misuse, and outside storage of pesticide-contaminated materials and equipment. Inappropriate management of vegetation and improper application of pesticides or fertilizers can result in stormwater contamination. These pollutants must not be discharged to the drainage system or directly into receiving waters, except as permitted by DEQ. Pesticides are prohibited for use in stormwater facilities. General Recommendations Avoid fertilizer application, soil erosion, and site debris. Cover and contain exposed, erodible soils. Develop and implement an integrated pest management (IPM) plan (see Appendix A for example) to address pest and disease issues. For an investigation district map with contact information, refer to this website: http://www.oregon.gov/ ODA/PEST/docs/pdf/invdist.pdf To control erosion and the discharge of stormwater pollutants, maintain appropriate vegetation, properly apply fertilizer where necessary, and consider the use of pest-resistant varieties when possible. Also, grow plant species appropriate for the site. Required Best Management Practices The following BMPs or equivalent measures are required of all businesses and public agencies engaged in landscaping or lawn and vegetation management activities. To report violations or ask questions about pesticide use, contact the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Landscaping • Do not dispose of collected vegetation in the surface water management system, waterways, receiving waters, or sensitive lands or protected areas. Take care to avoid contamination or site disturbance. • Use mulch or other erosion control measures when soils are exposed for more than one week during the dry season (June 1 to September 30) or more than two days during the rainy season (October 1 to May 31). Pesticides • Develop an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Plan Example. • Choose the least toxic pesticide that is capable of reducing the infestation to acceptable levels. • Conduct any pest control during the life stage when the pest is most vulnerable. For example, if it is necessary to use a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) application to control tent caterpillars, it must be applied before the caterpillars form their cocoons or it will be ineffective. The pest control method should be site-specific rather than generic. • When necessary to use pesticides, apply according to the directions on the label and use the following BMPs: • Conduct spray applications according to specific label directions and the applicable local and state regulations. Some applications may require a pesticide applicator's license. Please see http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/PEST/Pages/licensing_index.aspx • Do not apply pesticides if it is raining or immediately before expected rain (unless the label directs such timing). • Ensure that the pesticide application equipment is capable of immediate shutoff in the event of an emergency. • Do not apply pesticides within 100 feet of open waters including wetlands, ponds, streams, sloughs, or any drainage ditch or channel that leads to open water except when approved by DEQ and the City.All sensitive areas including wells, streams, and wetlands must be flagged prior to spraying. Take care to avoid contamination or site disturbance during applications. • Never apply pesticides in quantities that exceed the manufacturer's instructions. • Mix pesticides and clean the application equipment under cover in an area where accidental spills will not enter surface water or ground water and will not contaminate the soil. The City's Sensitive Lands ordinance also restricts certain described pesticide use within buffer zones of certain sensitive areas. Please contact the City Planning Department for more information on designated sensitive lands. Storage: • Store pesticides in enclosed areas or in covered impervious containment. • Do not hose down the paved areas to a storm drain, street, or other conveyance. • Ensure that pesticide-contaminated waste materials are kept in designated covered and contained areas, and disposed of properly. • Rinsate from equipment cleaning and/or triple-rinsing of pesticide containers should be used as product or recycled into product. Do not pour rinsate down the drain! Fertilizer • Ensure that all fertilizers are applied by properly trained personnel to areas requiring fertilizer (not driveways, pathways, or stormwater facilities). • Document and keep all training records. • For commercial and industrial facilities, ensure that fertilizers are not applied to grass swales, filter strips, or buffer areas that drain to sensitive receiving waters. Painting, Finishing, and Coating of Vehicles, Boats, Buildings, and Equipment This BMP applies to businesses and public agencies that perform outdoor surface preparation and application of paints, finishes, and coatings to vehicles, boats, buildings, and equipment. Potential pollutants include organic compounds, oils and greases, heavy metals (including copper, lead and zinc), and suspended solids. These pollutants must not be discharged to the surface water management system or directly into any receiving waters. General Recommendations Cover and contain exterior surface preparation, painting, and sanding operations and apply good housekeeping and preventive maintenance practices to prevent the contamination of stormwater with paint overspray and grit from sanding. Conduct activities indoors whenever possible. The following BMPs are recommended to further prevent and minimize the contamination of stormwater resulting from activities related to the painting, finishing, and coating of vehicles, boats, buildings, and equipment: • Recycle paints, paint thinner, solvents, wash water from pressure washers, and any other recyclable materials. • Use efficient spray equipment such as electrostatic, air-atomized, high-volume/low-pressure, or gravity-feed spray equipment. • Purchase recycled paints, paint thinner, solvents, and other products if feasible. Unused paint may be recycled at the Metro Recycling and Paint Disposal • Dispose of unused paint promptly. Facility: http://www.oregonmetro.goy/index.cfm/ go/by.web/id/571 Required Best Management Practices The following BMPs or equivalent measures are required of all businesses and public agencies engaged in activities related to the painting, finishing, and coating of vehicles, boats, buildings, and equipment. Preparation and Application • Train employees in the application and cleanup of paints, finishes, and coatings to reduce misuse and overspraying. Document and keep all training records. • Use ground cloths or drop cloths underneath outdoor painting, scraping, and sandblasting work, and properly clean and temporarily store collected debris. Porous drop cloths are recommended for exterior surface preparation work to capture solids and allow rainwater to seep through. • Use a storm drain cover, catch basin filter, or similarly effective runoff control device if dust, sediment, or other pollutants may escape the work area. If a catch basin filter is used on site, maintain the filter regularly (weekly, or as needed) to prevent plugging. • Do not conduct spraying, blasting, or sanding activities over open water or where wind may blow paint into water. If windy conditions are present, use a curtain to contain the activity. • While using a spray gun or conducting sand blasting, enclose and/or contain all work in compliance with applicable air pollution control requirements and those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Cleanup • Wipe up spills with rags and other absorbent materials immediately. Do not hose down the area. • On marine dock areas, sweep rather than hose down debris. Collect any water that is generated and convey it to an appropriate treatment and disposal facility. • Use a ground cloth, pail, drum, drip pan, tarpaulin, or other protective device for activities such as paint mixing and tool cleaning outside or where spills can contaminate stormwater. Whenever possible, conduct these activities inside or in an enclosed area. • Clean paint brushes and tools covered with water-based paints in sinks connected to sanitary sewers or in portable Unused paint may be recycled acontainers that can be dumped into a sanitarysewer drain. thep alM a Recycling and Paint p Disposal Facility: • Collect solvents used to clean brushes and tools covered http://www.oregonmetro.gov/index. with non-water-based paints, finishes, or other materials. cfm/go/by.web/id/571 Used solvents (e.g., paint thinner, turpentine, and xylol) must be recycled or be disposed of properly. Material Storage and Disposal • Dispose of all wastes and prevent all uncontrolled releases to the air, ground, and water. • Store all paints, finishes, or solvents inside a building or in covered secondary containment. • All containers must have tight-fitting lids. Parking Lot Maintenance and Storage of Vehicles and Equipment This BMP applies to businesses and public agencies that own or operate public and commercial parking lots and sidewalks, such as those associated with retail stores, apartment buildings, fleet vehicles (including car rental lots and car dealerships), and equipment sale and rental facilities. It also includes properties where vehicles or equipment are stored outside. Potential pollutants produced by the parking and storage of vehicles and equipment include petroleum hydrocarbons and other organic compounds, oils and greases, metals, and suspended solids. General Recommendations Prevent stormwater contamination by avoiding and reducing washing. Do not use soap or other chemicals unless the area drains to a sanitary sewer. When wash water is discharged to the sanitary sewer, check if pretreatment is necessary before being discharged. Some sites may be required to obtain a wash water permit from DEQ. For example, the washing of roads, parking lots, sidewalks, and other paved surfaces is permitted provided: • Surfaces are swept prior to washing, and • There is no runoff off the site or discharge to surface waters, storm sewers, or dry wells. Please see provisions of DEQ 1700B permit at http://www.deq.state.or.us/wq/wgpermit/genpermits.htm and or contact DEQ's Northwest Region Permit Office for more details. Required Best Management Practices The following BMPs or equivalent measures are required for activities related to the parking and storage of vehicles and equipment: • Sweep or vacuum parking lots, storage areas, sidewalks, and driveways regularly to collect dirt, waste, and debris and dispose of as solid waste. • Do not hose down or pressure wash areas that drain to a storm drain, drywell, or to the surface water ultimately receiving drainage water. • If a parking lot must be washed, discharge the wash water to a sanitary sewer or other approved wastewater treatment system, if allowed by the City, or collect it for offsite disposal. Please contact the City for more information. • Cover or plug storm drains to prevent wash water from entering the surface water management utility. • In some cases, contaminated stormwater may need to be pretreated before it is discharged to the sanitary sewer. • Make sure all outside materials that have the potential to leach or spill to the drainage system are covered, contained, or moved to an indoor location. • An oil removal system is recommended for high-use parking lots. Fueling at Dedicated Stations This BMP applies to businesses and public agencies that operate a facility used exclusively for the transfer of fuels from a stationary pumping station to vehicles or equipment. This type of fueling station includes aboveground or underground fuel storage facilities, which may be permanent or temporary. Permanent fueling stations include facilities such as, but not limited to, commercial gasoline stations, 24-hour convenience stores, car washes, warehouses, manufacturing establishments, maintenance yards, marinas and boatyards, and private fleet fueling stations. Temporary fueling stations include facilities such as, but not limited to, construction sites and any other site on which fuel is temporarily stored and dispensed into vehicles or equipment. A spill can be a one-time event, a continuous leak, or frequent small spills. All kinds must be prevented. Typically, stormwater contamination at fueling stations is caused by leaks or spills of fuels, lubrication oils, radiator coolants, and vehicle wash water. These materials contain organic compounds, oils and greases, and metals that can be harmful to humans and aquatic life. These pollutants must not be discharged to the surface water management system or directly into receiving waters. Direct or indirect discharges of antifreeze, oil, gasoline, grease, and all other automotive and petroleum products and flammable or explosive materials into the surface water management system are prohibited discharges under the City's stormwater code (LOC Chapter 38). These types of discharges are also prohibited by state regulations. General Recommendations All new fueling stations must be constructed on an impervious concrete pad under a roof to keep out rainfall and to prevent stormwater runon. A treatment BMP must be used for contaminated stormwater and wastewaters in the fueling containment area. Vehicle Repair and Maintenance This BMP applies to businesses and public agencies on whose premises oil, fuel, engine oil, and other fluids such as battery acid, coolants, and transmission and brake fluids are removed and replaced in vehicles and equipment. It also applies to mobile vehicle maintenance operations, such as those at construction sites. A spill can be a one-time event, a continuous leak, or frequent small spills. All kinds must be prevented. Pollutants of concern are toxic petroleum hydrocarbons, toxic organic compounds, oils and greases, pH, and metals. These pollutants must not be discharged to the surface water management system or directly into receiving waters. General Recommendations Leaks and spills of fluids can be prevented and contained by the use of good housekeeping measures and the use of cover and containment BMPs. Compliance can be achieved more easily with sewer and stormwater requirements by running a "dry shop," thereby reducing consumption and discharge of liquids. Soiled rags and other cleanup material must be properly managed in accordance with Lake Oswego Fire Code and Solid Waste regulations or cleaned and reused by a professional cleaning service. Leaks and spills of fluids can be prevented and contained by the use of good housekeeping measures and the use of cover and containment BMPs. Compliance can be achieved more easily with sewer and stormwater requirements by running a "dry shop," thereby reducing consumption and discharge of liquids. Soiled rags and other cleanup material must be properly managed in accordance with Lake Oswego Fire Code and Solid Waste regulations or cleaned and reused by a professional cleaning service. Although not required, the following BMPs can provide additional pollution protection: • Recycle oil, antifreeze, batteries, and air conditioning coolant. Recover air conditioningUnused paint may be recycled at the • gases. Metro Recycling and Paint Disposal Facility: • Use reusable cloth rags to clean up drips and small spills instead of disposable materials. http://www.oregonmetro.gov/index.cfm/ go/by.web/id/571 • Use absorbent pillows or booms in or around storm drains and catch basins to absorb oil and fuel. Required Best Management Practices The following BMPs or equivalent measures are required of all businesses and public agencies engaged in vehicle repair and maintenance activities: • Employees must be educated annually about the need for careful handling of automotive fluids. New employees must be trained upon hiring. Employees at businesses or public agencies that routinely change or handle these fluids must be trained in spill prevention and cleanup.All training must be documented. For information on training, see http://www.ecobiz.org/pdf/Keep-Shop.pdf • Spill cleanup materials, such as rags and absorbent materials, must always be kept close at hand when changing oil and other fluids. Soiled rags and other cleanup material must be properly disposed of or professionally cleaned and reused. • Maintenance and repair activities must be conducted indoors. • Drain all fluids that have the potential to leak from wrecked vehicles and equipment when they arrive. Store and dispose of fluids properly. • If the work must be performed outdoors or at a mobile location (such as a construction site), drip pans or other containment devices must be used beneath the vehicle or equipment to capture all spills. • Make sure all outside materials that have the potential to leach or spill to the drainage system are covered, contained, or moved to an indoor location. • Maintenance and repair areas cannot be hosed down. Instead, they must be swept weekly or more often as needed to collect dirt, and spills must be wiped up with rags and other absorbent materials. If pressure washing is necessary, the wastewater must be collected and disposed of properly. It cannot be discharged to the stormwater drainage system. • Drains located inside buildings must be connected to the sanitary sewer. • Do not allow drains inside maintenance buildings to connect to the sanitary sewer without prior approval from the City.A connection permit is needed to connect to the City's wastewater system. For information about connection permits, call the City Building Department. In most cases, stormwater collected on fuel containment pads will need to be pretreated before it is discharged to the sanitary sewer. • If floatable components are present, use an oil/water separator or other appropriate treatment to treat all runoff from the fluid changing area prior to discharge to the sanitary sewer. Swimming Pool and Spa Maintenance This BMP applies to all private, public and commercial swimming pools and spas. Pools and spas at hotels, motels, apartments, and condominium complexes are also covered. Pollutants of concern include nutrients, suspended solids, chlorine, pH adjusters, and substances that increase chemical oxygen demand. General Recommendations Dispose of pool or spa water to the sanitary sewer, if approved by the City. Although not required, the following BMP can further help to reduce the potential for stormwater contamination: • Hire a professional pool-draining service to collect all pool water for offsite disposal. Required Best Management Practices The following BMPs or equivalent measures are required for all swimming pool and spa cleaning and maintenance activities. • In some cases, contaminated washwater from swimming pool and spa cleaning and maintenance activities may need to be pretreated before it is discharged to the sanitary sewer. For approval before discharging wash water to the wastewater system, contact Public Works Operations (503-635-0282) at least 48 hours in advance. • Pool water may not be discharged to a receiving water or the surface water management system unless there are no detectable levels of chlorine because, even at low concentrations, chlorine is harmful to fish and other aquatic life. If pool discharge water is discharged to the ground, discharge must be slow enough to allow infiltration of all water into the ground and not produce surface runoff. • Diatomaceous earth used in pool filters cannot be discharged to receiving waters, drainage systems, septic systems, or the ground. Vehicle, Equipment, and Building Washing This BMP applies to the washing of vehicles, aircraft, vessels, The City has charity car wash kits industrial equipment, and large buildings. Discharges resulting from available at no cost to reduce the impacts of carwash fundraisers. See scrubbing, sanding, pressure washing, and steam cleaning are the City's website for more information also included in this category of cleaning and washing activities. (www.rai ntoriver.org). General Recommendations Vehicle washing by private citizens and fund-raising groups such as schools, churches, and scouting groups is permitted. However, fund-raising groups must employ the best management practices outlined in DEQ's fact sheet on non-profit activities: http://www.deq.state.or.us/wq/wqpermit/docs/general/wpcfl 700b/permit.pdf http://www.deq.state.or.us/wq/pubs/bmps/washactsnoprft.htm Wash water from cleaning activities can contain soaps and detergents, oils and greases, suspended solids, metals, and soluble organic compounds that can contaminate stormwater. These pollutants must not be discharged to the drainage system or directly into receiving waters. Although not required, the following BMPs can provide additional pollution control for businesses and public agencies that perform washing operations for vehicles, equipment, and building structures. To reduce potential overall pollution load to the sanitary sewer: • Minimize water and detergent use in all washing operations. • Use phosphate-free detergents when practical. • Consider recycling the washwater by installing a closed-loop water recycling system. For intermittent uses, such as at commercial parking lots and gasoline stations used for charity car washes where it is not possible to discharge the wash water to an indoor sanitary connection (such as to an indoor toilet or utility sink), a temporary plug or a temporary sump pump can be used at the storm drain to collect the wash water for offsite disposal, such as discharge to a nearby sanitary sewer. • At industrial sites, contact DEQ for NPDES permit requirements related to washing trucks. • Car dealerships may wash vehicles in the parking stalls if either a temporary plug system is used to collect the wash water for disposal, as stated above or an approved treatment system for the wash water is in place. Required Best Management Practices Cleaning, pressure washing, and steam cleaning wastewater must be discharged into a sanitary sewer drain at a site that is approved for discharge. It is illegal to discharge the dirty solution to the drainage system; however, the activity may be permitted for disposal in the wastewater system if approved by the City. For more information and to determine whether a type of chemical and an amount of water are permitted for discharge to the sanitary sewer system, contact the City Operations Division. If sanitary sewer disposal is not available or not allowed, the collected wastewater must be treated or transferred to a holding tank, where it must be picked up for disposal by a licensed waste hauler. The following BMPs or equivalent measures are required of all businesses and public agencies engaged in washing, pressure washing, or steam cleaning of vehicles, equipment, and building structures: • Conduct indoor vehicle and equipment washing operations in an area that drains to the wastewater system and that prevents the wash water from running outside and entering the surface water management system. • Conduct outdoor vehicle and equipment washing operations in a designated wash area that drains to a sump (like a grit separator) or a catch basin and then to the sanitary or another appropriate wastewater treatment or recycling system. • If adjacent to a building or constructed over hazardous material storage areas, roofs and covers are also regulated by the Fire Code. • At gasoline stations, multi-family residences, and any other business and public agency where vehicles are washed, clearly mark the washing area. A connection permit is required to connect to the City's wastewater system. For information about connection permits, call the City Building Department. In some cases, wash water may need to be pretreated before it is discharged to the sanitary sewer. Outdoor Storage or Transfer of Solid Raw Materials, Byproducts, or Finished Products This BMP applies to businesses and public agencies on whose premises there will be outdoor storage and transfer of solid raw materials, byproducts, or products such as, but not limited to, gravel, sand, salts, topsoil, compost, logs, sawdust, wood chips, lumber and other building materials, concrete, and metal products typically stored outside in large piles or stacks at commercial or industrial establishments. If stormwater comes in contact with the stockpiled materials listed above, pollutants can be leached or erosion of the stored materials may occur. Potential pollutants include suspended solids, substances that increase biological oxygen demand, organic compounds, and dissolved salts (e.g., sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride). These pollutants must not be discharged to the drainage system or directly into receiving waters. General Recommendations Cover and contain materials to prevent erosion. Erosion results in stormwater contamination and loss of valuable product. Required Best Management Practices The following BMPs or equivalent measures are required of all businesses and public agencies engaged in the outdoor storage or transfer of solid raw materials, byproducts, or finished products: • Do not hose down the contained stockpile area if the discharge will flow into a storm drain or a drainage conveyance. • Sweep paved storage areas daily or more often as necessary to collect and dispose of loose solid materials. • For stockpiles containing more than 5 cubic yards of erodible or water-soluble materials such as soil, deicing salts for roads, compost, unwashed sand and gravel, and sawdust; and for outside storage areas for solid materials such as logs, bark, lumber, and metal products, choose one or more of the following BMPs: Store in a building or a covered, paved area, preferably surrounded by a berm. Place temporary plastic sheeting (polyethylene, polypropylene, hypalon, or equivalent material) over the material. Appendix K Maintenance Checklists LO SWMM 2020 Update [; Appendix K Stormwater Facilities - Inspection and Maintenance Log OWNER: CONTACT INFO: FACILITY LOCATION/ADDRESS: FACILITY TYPE: ACCESS NOTES: Refer to the facility's quarterly inspection requirements in the O&M Plan before conducting inspections and maintenance actions. INSPECTION YEAR: WINTER INSPECTION LOG SPRING INSPECTION LOG SUMMER INSPECTION LOG FALL INSPECTION LOG DATE: DATE: DATE: DATE: INSPECTOR NAME: INSPECTOR NAME: INSPECTOR NAME: INSPECTOR NAME: COMPONENTS INSPECTED*: COMPONENTS INSPECTED: COMPONENTS INSPECTED: COMPONENTS INSPECTED: STRUCTURAL: ❑ STRUCTURAL: ❑ STRUCTURAL: ❑ STRUCTURAL: ❑ PONDING AREA: ❑ PONDING AREA: ❑ PONDING AREA: ❑ PONDING AREA: ❑ VEGETATION: ❑ VEGETATION: ❑ VEGETATION: ❑ VEGETATION: ❑ MAINTENANCE ACTIONS PERFORMED: MAINTENANCE ACTIONS PERFORMED: MAINTENANCE ACTIONS PERFORMED: MAINTENANCE ACTIONS PERFORMED: *Structural Components include all`hard'e,ements of the facility(inlets, flow spreaders, liners, overflow caps, etc.). *Ponding Area includes areas on the surface or underground where stormwater accumulates. Inspect for blockages, sediment, and trash. *Vegetation includes maintaining vegetation, so the facility can function as designed(i.e. tree pruning, weed removal, mowing, grass management). Lake Oswego SWMM Planters NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Remove and replace contaminated soil. Call Metro (503.797.1700) to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials and contaminated soil. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip Structural Component Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Replace or repair inlets if they are cracked or broken. X X Reseal inlet pipes if they are not watertight. 'Check overflow caps and replace if cracked or missing. X X X Check flow spreader, if present, and repair as necessary. Check inlet protection and replace or replenish rock as X X necessary. Check liner, if present, and repair tears or holes as X X necessary. Replace liner as necessary. Patch concrete. X X 24-hr Precip Ponding Area Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" (Remove trash. X X X X X 'Remove sediment from ponding area and inlets. X X X X X X Replace or replenish rock at inlets if erosion is occurring. Check trench drains discharging to the facility and X X X X X remove any soil or debris. Check for channeled flow in facility; fill in channels with X X X soil and add plants to disperse flow. Add 3" of mulch or top soil to bare areas and reseed or replant to achieve 100%coverage at maturity. Do not add X bark dust or bark chips; they will float and then clog the outlet or create bare spots. Remove weeds, invasive plants, and dead plants. X X X Replant or reseed to achieve 100% coverage at maturity Thin grasses (remove dead blades) or remove top third of X previous year's growth. 'Prune shrubs. X X If facility drains slowly, rake soil to stop crusting. Replace X X X X or amend soil if ponding occurs more than 24 hours If ponding occurs more than 48 hours, notify City X X X X stormwater engineers (503.635.0270). Raingardens NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Remove and replace contaminated soil. Call Metro (503.797.1700) to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials and contaminated soil. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip Structural Repairs Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Replace or repair inlets if they are cracked or broken. X X Reseal inlet pipes if they are not watertight. Check overflow caps and replace if cracked or missing. X X X Check flow spreader, if present, and repair as necessary. Check inlet protection and replace or replenish rock as X X necessary. 24-hr Precip Ponding Area Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Remove trash. X X X X X Remove sediment from ponding area and inlets. X X X Replace or replenish rock at inlets if erosion is occurring. X X X Check trench drains discharging to the facility and X X X X X remove any soil or debris. Check for channeled flow in facility; fill in channels with X X X soil and add plants to disperse flow. Add 3" of mulch or top soil to bare areas and reseed or replant to achieve 100%coverage at maturity. Do not add X bark dust or bark chips;they will float and then clog the outlet or create bare spots. Remove weeds, invasive plants, and dead plants. Replant X X X or reseed to achieve 100% coverage at maturity Thin grasses (remove dead blades) or remove top third of X previous year's growth. Prune shrubs and trees. X X If facility drains slowly, rake soil to stop crusting. Replace X X X X or amend soil if ponding occurs more than 24 hours. If ponding occurs more than 48 hours, notify City X X X X stormwater engineers (503.635.0270). Bioswales NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Remove and replace contaminated soil. Call Metro (503.797.1700) to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials and contaminated soil. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip Structural Repairs Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Replace or repair inlets if they are cracked or broken. X X Reseal inlet pipes if they are not watertight. Check overflow caps or grates and repair as necessary. X X X Replace if they are missing. Check flow spreader, if present, and repair as necessary. Check inlet protection and replace or X X replenish rock as necessary. 24-hr Precip Ponding Area Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Remove trash. X X X X X Remove sediment from ponding area and inlets. X X X Replace or replenish rock at inlets if erosion is X X X occurring. Check trench drains discharging to the facility and X X X X X remove any soil or debris. Check for channeled flow in facility; fill in channels with X X X soil and add plants to disperse flow. Add 3" of mulch or top soil to bare areas and reseed or replant to achieve 100%coverage at maturity. Do not add x bark dust or bark chips; they will float and then clog the outlet or create bare spots. Remove weeds, invasive plants, and dead plants. Replant or reseed to achieve 100%coverage at X X X maturity Thin grasses (remove dead blades) or remove top third of previous year's growth. X Prune shrubs and trees. X X If facility drains slowly, rake soil to stop crusting. Replace or amend soil if ponding occurs more than 24 X X X X hours. If ponding occurs more than 48 hours, notify City X X X X stormwater engineers (503.635.0270). Dry Wells NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Have drywell professionally cleaned and notify Oregon DEQ (503.229.5623). Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip Maintenance Component Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Replace or repair inlets if they are cracked or broken. Reseal inlet pipes if they are not X X watertight. Remove sediment from catchbasin. X X X Remove leaf litter/debris from gutters. X X Check trench drains leading to the facility and X X X X X remove any soil or debris. Remove inspection portal lid and check for spalling or cracking of walls and for root intrusions. Repair X X as necessary. Remove inspection portal lid and check sediment X X depth. Have professionally cleaned when depth of sediment or debris is 6" or greater. Remove Inspection portal lid and contact City stormwater engineers (503.635.0270) if ponding X X X X occurs for more than 48 hours. Infiltration Galleries and Trenches NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Have drywell professionally cleaned and notify Oregon DEQ (503.229.5623). Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip Maintenance Component Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Replace or repair inlets if they are cracked or broken. Reseal inlet pipes if they are not X X watertight. Remove sediment from catchbasin. X X X Remove leaf litter/debris from gutters. X X Check trench drains leading to the facility and X X X X X remove any soil or debris. Remove inspection portal lid. Check for cracking of walls and root intrusion. Remove roots and repair X X X walls as necessary. Have professionally cleaned when depth of sediment or debris is 3" or greater. Remove Inspection portal lid and contact City stormwater engineers (503.635.0270) if ponding X X X X occurs for more than 48 hours. Pervious Pavement NO pesticide, herbicide, fungicide, or moss inhibitor use is allowed. NO sand or de-icer should be used on paver area Clean up spills immediately. Call Metro (503.797.1700) to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip Maintenance Component Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Check for moss growth. Use baking soda to kill moss and then scrape dead moss off and throw in yard X X waste bin. Sweep leaf litter and debris off pavement. Use a professional pavement sweeper or wet/dry vacuum as X X X necessary. NO pressure washing; it clogs the pavement. X X Remove overhanging plants or grass near pavers. During rainstorms, check for water running onto X X X surface and divert water away from pavement. Repair cracks and settling as necessary. X X If ponding or runoff occurs, contact the City X X X X stormwater engineers (503.635.0270). Pavers NO pesticide, herbicide, fungicide, or moss inhibitor use is allowed. NO sand or de-icer should be used on paver area Clean up spills immediately. Call Metro (503.797.1700) to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip Maintenance Component Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Check for moss growth. Use baking soda to kill moss and then scrape dead moss off and throw in yard X X waste bin. Sweep off leaf litter and debris from the area; use a wet/dry vacuum as necessary. A pressure washer X X X may be used if infill material between pavers is replenished after completion of work. Manually remove weeds and invasive plants. Remove X X X overhanging plants or grass near pavers. X Check for broken pavers and replace as necessary. If settling occurs, remove pavers from settled area X and regrade it before putting pavers back in place. During rainstorms, check for water running onto X X X surface and divert water away from pavers. Observe area during rainstorms. If slow draining, X X X X note the occurrence on the inspection log and replace infill material between pavers the next summer. Replace infill material between pavers if area was X slow draining during the previous year. If ponding or runoff occurs, contact the City X X X X stormwater engineers (503.635.0270). Filter Strips or Landscaped Areas Receiving Sheetflow from Impervious Areas NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Remove and replace contaminated soil. Call Metro (503.797.1700) to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials and contaminated soil. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip Maintenance Component Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Remove trash. X X X X X Remove accumulated sediment. X X X Replace or replenish rock bordering filter strip or X X X sheet flow area, as necessary. Check flow spreader, if present, and repair as necessary. Check inlet protection and replace or X X X replenish rock as necessary. Check trench drains leading to the facility and X X X X X remove any soil or debris. Check for channeled flow; fill in channels with soil X X X and add plants to disperse flow. Remove weeds, invasive plants, and dead plants. Replant or reseed to achieve 100% coverage at X X X maturity Thin grasses (remove dead blades) or remove top X third of previous year's growth. Prune shrubs and trees. X X If moss is present, aerate the area or add 1/2 inch X X of 3/4-inch clean (no fines) rock. If facility drains slowly, aerate grasses or rake soil to stop crusting. Replace or amend soil if ponding X X X X occurs more than 24 hours. If runoff occurs or area ponds for more than 48 hours, notify City stormwater engineers X X X X (503.635.0270). Detention Ponds and Infiltration Ponds NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Remove and replace contaminated soil. Call Metro (503.797.1700)to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials and contaminated soil. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip > Structural Repairs Spring Summer Fall Winter 1" Replace or repair inlets if they are cracked or broken. X X Reseal inlet pipes if they are not watertight. I Remove sediment in catchbasins discharging to pond. X X Check outlet grates and repair as necessary. Replace X X them if they are missing. Inspect outlet structure. Clean clogged orifices. Repair X X X cracked or broken shear gate and handles. Check spillway. Repair any spalling or cracks. Fill in and X X compact eroded areas. 24-hr Precip > Ponding Area Spring Summer Fall Winter 1" I Remove trash. X X X X X I Remove sediment from ponding area and inlets. X X X Replace or replenish rock at inlets if scouring/erosion is X X X occurring. Check flow dissipaters. Repair or replace diffuser as X X necessary. Replace or replenish rock as necessary. Check for channeled flow in facility. Fill in channels with X X X soil and add plants to disperse flow. Add 3" of mulch or top soil to bare areas and reseed or replant to achieve 100%coverage. Do not add bark dust or X X X bark chips;they will float as the pond refills and either clog the outlet or create bare spots in the ponding area. Remove weeds, invasive plants, and dead plants. Replant X X X or reseed to achieve 100%coverage at maturity Thin grasses (remove dead blades) or remove top third of X previous year's growth. I Prune shrubs and trees. X X If facility drains slowly, rake soil to stop crusting. Replace X X X X or amend soil if ponding occurs more than 24 hours. If ponding occurs more than 48 hours, notify City X X X X stormwater engineers (503.635.0270). Retention Ponds NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Remove and replace contaminated soil. Call Metro (503.797.1700) to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials and contaminated soil. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip Structural Component Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Replace or repair inlets if they are cracked or broken. Reseal X X inlet pipes if they are not watertight. Remove sediment in catchbasins discharging to pond. X X Check outlet grates and repair as necessary. Replace them if they are missing. X X Inspect outlet structure. Clean clogged orifices. Repair cracked or broken shear gate and handles. X X X Check spillway. Repair minor spalling or cracks and fill in eroded areas. X X X Check spillway and berms. Contact the City Engineering Department (503.635.0270) if the erosion is severe or there X X X is evidence of concrete cracking or spalling. 24-hr Precip Ponding Area Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Remove trash. X X X X X Remove sediment from ponding area and inlets. X X X Replace or replenish rock at inlets if erosion is occurring. X X X Check flow dissipaters. Repair or replace diffuser as X X necessary. Replace or replenish rock as necessary. Check for channeled flow in facility. Fill in channels with soil X X X and add plants to disperse flow. Add 3" of mulch or top soil to bare areas and reseed or replant to achieve 100%coverage. Do not add bark dust or bark chips; X X X they will float as the pond refills and either clog the outlet or create bare spots in the ponding area. Remove weeds, invasive plants, and dead plants. Replant or X X X reseed to achieve 100% coverage at maturity Thin grasses (remove dead blades) or remove top third of X previous year's growth Prune shrubs and trees X X Check depth or high water mark in several areas. If depth is less than 50%of design depth, dredge area and replant. If X X depth is more than 150%of the design depth, add soil and replant in channeled area. Constructed Wetlands NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Remove and replace contaminated soil. Call Metro (503.797.1700) to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials and contaminated soil. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip > Structural Repairs Spring Summer Fall Winter 1" Replace or repair inlets if they are cracked or broken. X X Reseal inlet pipes if they are not watertight. Remove sediment in catchbasins discharging to pond. X X Inspect outlet structure. Clean clogged orifices. Repair X X cracked or broken shear gate and handles. Check spillway and berms. Add erosion control matting to X X X areas of slight or moderate erosion. Check spillway and berms. Contact the City Engineering X X X Department (503.635.0270) if the erosion is severe or there is evidence of concrete cracking or spalling. 24-hr Precip > Ponding Area Spring Summer Fall Winter 1" Remove trash. X X X X X Remove sediment from ponding area and inlets. X X X X X X Replace or replenish rock at inlets if erosion is occurring. Check flow dissipaters. Repair or replace diffuser as X X necessary. Replace or replenish rock as necessary. Add 3" of mulch or top soil to bare areas and reseed or replant to achieve 100%coverage. Do not add bark dust or X X X bark chips; they will float as the wetland refills and either clog the outlet or create bare spots in the ponding area. Remove weeds, invasive plants, and dead plants. Replant X X X or reseed to achieve 100% coverage at maturity Thin grasses (remove dead blades) or remove top third of X previous year's growth. Prune shrubs and trees. X X Check depth or high water mark in several areas. If depth is less than 50% of design depth, dredge area and replant. X X If depth is more than 150% of the design depth, add soil and replant in channeled area. Detention Tanks and Vaults NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Call Metro (503.797.1700) to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. 24-hr Precip Structural Component Spring Summer Fall Winter > 1" Replace or repair inlets if they are cracked or broken. Reseal inlet pipes if they are not X X watertight. Remove sediment in catchbasins discharging to X X X tank or vault. Remove inspection portal lid, check for root intrusion, and remove roots and repair facility as necessary. Check sediment depth and have X X X professionally cleaned when depth of sediment and debris is 1/3 of sumped depth. Rainwater Harvesting NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Call Metro (503.797.1700) to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. Maintain system per attached manufacturer's requirements Green Roof NO pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide use is allowed Clean up spills immediately. Call Metro (503.797.1700) to determine proper disposal requirements of spill response materials. Record the date and spill response measures in the inspection log. Maintain system per attached manufacturer's requirements