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Retrofit Assessment i i • II I I r + I I I I Retrofit Strateg• 4 ,„ • 3/6 • • -0 • • ., U r FF July 1, 2015 Cover: Sailing on Oswego Lake, 1962. Photo courtesy of the Lake Oswego Library. City of Lake Oswego Retrofit Strategy MS4 Permit Requirement Schedule A. 6 °R�°ors City of Lake Oswego I,the undersigned,hereby submit this National Pollutant Discharge elimination System (NPDES) Municipal Storm Water System Public Education Effectiveness Evaluation Summary in accordance with NPDES Permit Number 101348. 1 certify under penalty of law that this document and all attachments were prepared under my direction or supervision in accordance with a system designed to assure that qualified personnel properly gather and evaluate the information submitted. Based on my inquiry of the person, or persons, who manage the system, or those persons directly responsible for gathering the information,the information submitted is,to the best of my knowledge and belief,true, accurate and complete. I am aware that there are significant penalties for submitting false information,including the possibility of fine and imprisonment for knowing violations. c rs�g Ze %`3 /o/i3" Scott Lazenby, City Manager Date Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction 1 2.0 Stormwater Retrofit Strategy 2 2.1 Retrofit Summary Statement 2 2.2 Retrofit Objectives and Rationale 2 2.2.1 Retrofit Objectives 3 2.2.2 Retrofit Rationale 3 2.3 Integration With the City's Capital Improvement Planning Process 6 2.3.1 The Capital Improvement Plan Process 6 2.3.2 Purpose of the Capital Improvement Plan 7 2.3.3 Effect of CIP On Operating Costs 7 2.3.4 Summary 8 3.0 Current Retrofit Measures 8 3.1 Retrofit Measures Being Implemented 9 3.2 Program Resources Devoted to Retrofits 10 4.0 Identification of High Priority Retrofit Areas 11 5.0 Retrofit Alternative Evaluation and Priority Project List 14 5.1 Consideration of New Stormwater Control Measures 14 5.2 Preferred Structural Control Measures 14 5.3 Retrofit Project Priority List 14 List of Tables Table 1. Surface Water Infrastructure Project Prioritization FY15-16 to FY20-21, Ordered by Surface Water CIP Rank 16 Table 2. Water Quality Retrofit Project Prioritization FY15-16 to FY20-21, Ordered by Surface Water CIP Rank 18 List of Figures Figure 1. Major watersheds in Lake Oswego 4 Figure 2. Lake Oswego zoning and functional street classification 12 Figure 3.Average Daily Traffic (ADT) on Lake Oswego streets 13 Figure 4. Locations of prioritized retrofit projects 20 1.0 Introduction The City of Lake Oswego is responsible for managing stormwater and surface water quality through both a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) permit and through implementation of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) on the Tualatin and Willamette Rivers. This document represents compliance with the City of Lake Oswego's MS4 permit, Schedule A.6,which requires completion of a City-wide retrofit strategy describing actions necessary to guide implementation of stormwater retrofits. Per Schedule A.6,the plan must: .... describe or reference the following: i. Stormwater retrofit strategy statement and summary, including objectives and rationale; ii. Summary of current stormwater retrofit control measures being implemented, and current estimate of annual program resources directed towards stormwater retrofits; iii. Identification of developed areas or land uses impacting water quality that are high priority retrofit areas; iv. Consideration of new stormwater control measures; v. Preferred retrofit structural control measures, including rationale; vi. A retrofit control measure project or approach priority list, including rationale, identification and map of potential stormwater retrofit locations where appropriate, and an estimated timeline and cost for implementation of each project or approach. This remainder of this document is divided into the following sections: 2.0 Stormwater Retrofit Strategy 3.0 Current Retrofit Measures 4.0 Identification of High Priority Retrofit Areas 5.0 Retrofit Alternative Evaluation and Priority Project List H:\Surface Water\Regulatory\MS4 PERMIT\Additional Requirements\Retrofit Program\Final Report\Retrofit Lake Oswego 070115.docx 1 2.0 Stormwater Retrofit Strategy 2.1 Retrofit Summary Statement The City of Lake Oswego will continue to retrofit portions of the Cityscape to add stormwater treatment and other structural measures that improve receiving water quality within constraints of property ownership, site conditions, and staff and fiscal resources. The City commits to incorporating water quality treatment and runoff volume reduction measures into publicly funded projects, 2.2 Retrofit Objectives and Rationale The City went through a master planning process in the 2006-2009 time frame, resulting in the Clean Streams Plan.1 This plan, supported by substantial contributions from the community, has as its governing principle, To manage flooding and improve stormwater quality in a manner that recognizes the value and function of the natural surface water systems. Out of this statement came the following surface water program goals: To cost-effectively implement and maintain a sustainable drainage system to: • Promote public safety and minimize property damage • Protect and enhance the quality of surface water • Preserve and enhance fish and wildlife habitat. The Clean Streams Plan, as updated during the City's annual capital improvement planning (CIP) process described below, represents the core of the City's retrofit strategy, to which City staff has been adding in the intervening years. The Clean Streams Plan was developed using an extensive public process. The City's CIP process is also subject to public review as the project list moves through the annual budgeting process. This retrofit strategy document summarizes key elements of the Clean Streams Plan and subsequent updates in a format consistent with the MS4 permit requirements. This retrofit strategy is reflected in the City's 2015 TMDL Implementation Plan2 to the extent that several of the retrofit capital projects consist of some form of instream habitat enhancement to mitigate for hydromodification impacts. The draft TMDL Implementation Plan has been made available 1 City of Lake Oswego. 2009.Clean Streams Plan. Prepared by Otak, Inc., Lake Oswego, Oregon. November. 2 City of Lake Oswego. 2015.2015 TMDL Implementation Plan. Lake Oswego,Oregon.June 30,2015. 2 July 1,2015 for public review in both its current form in June 2015 and in a preliminary form in May 2014. The surface water program also complies with current City sustainability principles. 2.2.1 Retrofit Objectives The City of Lake Oswego's retrofit objective is to manage water quality under both an NPDES MS4 permit and obligations imposed by TMDLs on channel segments within the Tualatin and Willamette River basins.As much as practicable,these obligations are jointly considered across a wide range of program activities, including retrofit activities. Combining these regulatory obligations with the goals of the City's surface water program, the City's stormwater quality retrofit objectives are: 1. Reduce stormwater pollutants to the maximum extent practicable by installing structural gray and green BMPs for runoff from increasingly larger proportions of the City's public infrastructure, favoring low impact development approaches wherever practicable. BMPs are expected to provide treatment for multiple pollutants based on site conditions and pollutants causing impairment in receiving waters (e.g., for which there are 303(d) listings or TMDLs). 2. Support the protection and enhancement of instream and riparian habitat through a mix of City code, City programs, and incentives to private landowners. Protection of stream corridors is primarily,but not exclusively, directed at increasing effective shade.Vegetation management activities in riparian areas should not promote shade at the expense of increasing loads of other pollutants, particularly those causing impairments in receiving waters,but may trade off short term water quality impacts for long term water quality benefit. Retrofits on private property are important for reaching water quality goals. Should more resources become available,the City may amend this plan to promote these activities through City code, and education and outreach activities. 2.2.2 Retrofit Rationale Five key conditions within Lake Oswego inform the City's retrofit strategy, as described below and in the Clean Streams Plan. Physiography The City of Lake Oswego extends generally from ridgeline to ridgeline north and south of Oswego Lake (Figure 1).While approximately two-thirds of the City drains to the lake,the remainder of the city drains west to Fanno Creek (a tributary of the Tualatin River), south directly to the Tualatin River, and east to the Willamette River. Most of the northeastern portion of the City drains to the Willamette River through Tryon Creek. Other than the two 3 July 1,2015 ! ' I I' @P°,a . T ic-j- ill . • ' „, r, r r / Sprin••: 'Pi . )f �`.�„.__ { 4 ? � Tualatin Subba f Tryon Creek'�� 1: ai J I } River Country CIc, J Subbasin r !,411 ,�i I Basin ,.yam I Y' 1 l LJL ��[jlm AAve ��_I y 'ruse 1,,a (s r J y ti / 5Q n / rcn � (• Willamette a, �6 lake River Basi ` ddr �\Ve`�0 L �te0 pay 43 on 9r�' ` M� 1 1 -, ,\ N Oswego Lake ` r , Subbasin �' i 4410 - Wes _.. ( /0 n l ./{0. River�, , ruploiin,11, m paSln i 71P Z I f , pi, Figure 1. Major watersheds in Lake Oswego. 4 rivers and Tryon and Springbrook creeks, surface water drainages within the City are small headwater streams. Much of the City's land area is sloping, and some of it is quite steep.A large proportion of the land area has been recently mapped as being of moderate or high risk of slope failures (Burns et al. 2013)3. This results in efficient delivery of pollutants to watercourses.At the same time,the type and distribution of stormwater BMPs that can be used in the City are constrained. Infiltration-based BMPs cannot be used to maximum effect due to slope stability concerns, and stormwater cannot be collected over large areas of the cityscape for treatment in regional facilities. Soils In addition to the limitations place on infiltration due to slope stability, most of the soils in the City are of low permeability. Over 80% are in hydrologic groups C and D,with infiltration capacity for bare soils of 0.15 inches per hour or less. Development History Much of the City was developed prior to stormwater quality controls that first appeared in the early 1990s in response to the 1988 Tualatin River phosphorus TMDL. Many areas developed before 1970 were in unincorporated areas at the time. They had little or no storm drainage infrastructure other than roadside ditches. This streetscape, and associated drainage strategy, is still valued by many residents. Given the City's development timeline, virtually all public investment in stormwater quality infrastructure—from proprietary BMPs to riparian buffers—represents a retrofit situation. Riparian Land Ownership Outside of Tryon Creek State Natural Area and the City's Springbrook Park, most of the riparian corridors in the City are under private ownership. Of the privately owned designated riparian buffers, 7% of the area is in private open space tracts that were a condition of development. This designation applies to 73 parcels. The first private open space tracts were included in the Mountain Park development of the late 1960s-early 1970s. Protection of stream corridors was listed as a city-wide goal in the first Comprehensive Plan in 1978. The remaining 93% of designated riparian buffer area in private ownership is split into 1010 parcels, of which 913 are single family residential, 44 are multifamily residential, and 53 are commercial or industrial. 3 Burns,W.G., K.A. Mickelson,C.B.Jones,S.G. Pickner, K.L.B. Hughes,and R.Sleeter.2013. Landslide Hazard and Risk Study of Northwestern Clackamas County,Oregon. Open File Report 0-13-08.Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. 5 Infrastructure Investment City residents expect a high level of infrastructure quality and service,with an emphasis on those elements that can be seen on a daily basis, specifically streets, parks and open space, the library, and paths and sidewalks.4 Surface water capital investment is generally constrained by revenues in the City's Surface Water Utility Fund. This fund is also used for operational and programmatic activities related to surface water management. The City is not currently contributing general fund revenues directly to surface water quality improvement,with one notable exception: the City's Habitat Enhancement Program,which is used in part to enhance riparian areas on public and private land, is included in the City's 2015-2020 TMDL Implementation Plan. 2.3 Integration With the City's Capital Improvement Planning Process Water quality retrofit projects are but one of many types of capital projects undertaken by the City each year. Recognizing how projects are placed into the overall management of City infrastructure is an important component of this retrofit strategy. 2.3.1 The Capital Improvement Plan Process The City of Lake Oswego CIP is a multi-year plan for major capital expenditures that matches available resources with project needs. Projects for the CIP may be developed by staff,by public advisory boards, or through planning documents with a dedicated public process. The CIP lists each proposed capital project, the time frame in which the project needs to be undertaken,the financial requirements of the project, and proposed methods of financing. It also attempts to identify and plan for all major capital needs, and addresses capital items that are different from those covered under the capital outlay category in each department's budget. Generally, CIP improvements are relatively expensive and non-recurring, have a multi-year useful life, and result in fixed assets. They include construction and acquisition of new buildings, additions to or renovations of existing buildings, construction and reconstruction of streets,water, and sanitary sewer improvements, drainage improvements, land purchases, and major equipment purchases. Typical capital projects in the surface water program are financed by monthly utility fees. Only for the largest projects such as the Lake Oswego Interceptor Sewer or the Lake Oswego-Tigard Water Partnership are general obligation bonds and revenue bonds are major sources of funding. a CFM.2015.City of Lake Oswego Community Survey. Prepared by cfm Strategic Communications, Portland, Oregon.April. 6 July 1,2015 When the CIP is adopted by the City Council, the respective years become part of the biennium budget. Projects beyond these years are reassessed when the subsequent budget is prepared. When projects are approved for financing by the City Council, they are moved from the "unfunded"to the "funded" sections of the CIP. The City puts a great deal of emphasis on cost-effective management of capital investments. Therefore, in addition to being ranked within the overall surface water utility budget, City retrofit projects are typically sequenced to be integrated with other capital investments, particularly in roadways and facilities. 2.3.2 Purpose of the Capital Improvement Plan The CIP process began with the adoption of the City's first CIP in March 1994. It has been updated every one to two years since. The program was initiated because the City needed a budgeting and financial planning tool to prioritize projects in a proactive manner and develop long-range financing strategies for capital facilities. The CIP brings together a six- years schedule of needed capital projects for: • Parks, recreation facilities, open space, and beautification programs • Transportation, including intersections, pathways, roads, bridges, and the trolley • Utilities, including water, sanitary sewer, and surface water management • General government and public safety facilities. 2.3.3 Effect of CIP On Operating Costs For the past few years,the CIP for the City of Lake Oswego has focused on adding value and extended life to City infrastructure with no increase in current operating costs. Current CIP policy states that, "[t]he City will maintain its physical assets at a level adequate to protect the City's capital investment and to minimize future maintenance and replacement costs. The budget will provide for adequate maintenance and orderly replacement of capital assets from current revenues where possible." Funds in the Street Improvement Bond Fund have been expended for reconstruction work on major streets and the resurfacing of roads with no associated operating costs. Stormwater improvements to streets may come from either the Street Fund or, more commonly,the Surface Water Fund. Projects of LORA In the City's Urban Renewal Agency The Urban Renewal Agency of the City of Lake Oswego/Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency (LORA) is a separate entity from the City and prepares its own budget. LORA's S As of the 2015-2016 CIP,the City has moved from a 5-year CIP to a six-year CIP to coincide with a shift to biennial budgeting. 7 July 1,2015 mission of improving the East End commercial area of Lake Oswego. LORA identifies its own projects and the financing strategy to carry them out, and goes through a separate budget adoption from the City's budget and CIP. LORA projects are expected to conform to current or,where possible, reasonably anticipated stormwater standards and practices. The Public Facility Plan (PFP) The Public Facility Plan covers a twenty-year period and complements the CIP as a longer- range capital project and fiscal planning tool. Updates and amendments to the six-year CIP are coordinated with the PFP and vice-versa.The PFP is a land use document adopted as part of the City's Comprehensive Plan.Although it covers a longer period in time, it is limited to utility and transportation projects,whereas the CIP includes other projects like parks, open space, and government facilities. 2.3.4 Summary Updating the CIP is a dynamic process,with projects being modified (i.e., split into multiple projects, combined with other projects), added and deleted from funded and unfunded lists as they move through the project completion process. The following considerations are used in the evaluation of CIP projects: • Fiscal impacts o Health and safety effects • Community economic effects • Environmental, aesthetic, and social effects o Amount of disruption and inconvenience o Effort required to bring project up to local minimum standards o Distribution effects o Feasibility, including public support and project readiness o Implications of deferring the project • Advantages that would accrue from relation to other capital projects • Whether an urgent need or opportunity is present. 3.0 Current Retrofit Measures The Clean Streams Plan recommended a number of capital surface water retrofit projects to compliment ongoing capital investments. Surface water project ranking criteria outlined in the plan continue to be used to rank capital projects: 1. Protects public infrastructure 8 July 1,2015 2. Protects private infrastructure from runoff from City infrastructure 3. Reduces flooding or landslide risk 4. Required for City compliance with State and Federal regulations 5. Improves natural resource values 6. Improves water quality 7. Repairs existing infrastructure 8. Constitutes preventative maintenance. Within this ranking scheme, the first three criteria are weighted double.Arguably, however, criteria #3, 5, and 6 combined provide for considerable weight being placed on goals related to watershed scale improvement of instream conditions for beneficial resources. These priorities were derived, in part, from priorities articulated in 1998 by the City Engineer for stream restoration projects6: 1. Water quality benefit 2. Protection of public facilities 3. Restoration of sensitive lands 4. Re-establishment of historic streams 5. Protection of developed property from flooding. 3.1 Retrofit Measures Being Implemented Because the City is virtually all developed, nearly any public project that includes stormwater treatment measures in Lake Oswego now represents a retrofit project. The City has been implementing retrofit projects since approximately 2006,with an emphasis on LID techniques. Early projects included: installation of stormwater planters on Middlecrest Road, Leonard Street, and West Bay Road; stormfilters at Millenium Park Plaza in downtown; and rain gardens and planters at Sundeleaf Plaza, also in downtown.A mix of planters, rain gardens, swales, and pervious pavement was also installed on 10th Avenue for several blocks north and one block south of Country Club Road, the western gateway to 6 Memo re.stream restoration capital improvement policy from Mark Schoening, City Engineer,to Douglas Schmitz, City Manager, February 19, 1998 9 July 1,2015 downtown. Retrofit projects undertaken to date during the current permit term (beginning March 2012) are: • Kerr Parkway: over 2 miles of this arterial linking Boones Ferry Road with Portland Community College and the Capitol Highway corridor was rebuilt during 2014- 2015. The road carries over 7,000 ADT. LID stormwater planters and drainage swales were constructed to treat stormwater from 44,270 sq. ft. of new and repaved impervious surface from the road project, and also provided treatment of runon from 11, 675 sq.ft. of adjacent impervious surface. This project is the City's designated retrofit project under MS4 permit Schedule A.6.c. • 2nd Street: 2nd Street between A and B Avenues in downtown Lake Oswego was rebuilt to make a more pedestrian-friendly streetscape. Included in this rebuild are a series of stormwater treatment planters. These are lined planters that overflow to the stormwater pipe network in downtown. Infiltration is limited by an adjacent gas station with formerly leaking underground storage tanks and residual soil hydrocarbons acknowledged in a No Further Action Letter issued by DEQ. In between stormwater planters, street trees were planted in wells with structural soils. • Ash Street deep culvert replacement: A failing culvert below Ash Street was replaced in a manner that allowed the street to be widened while improving the stream corridor and slightly reducing the length of the culvert. • Adult Community Center Slope Stability: this project stabilized a landslide below a City stormwater outfall that was delivering large volumes of sediment and associated pollutants (e.g., phosphorus, mercury and other metals) directly to Tryon Creek. 3.2 Program Resources Devoted to Retrofits The City of Lake Oswego is approved to spend approximately$54 million in capital expenditures in FY15-16. Of this amount, nearly$1.6 million is devoted to the first three capital projects on Table 1. The retrofit component of these projects is roughly$800,000. In addition,there are stormwater retrofit components in the $2.2 million dollar Laurel/Hallinan Pathway project and in the substantially rebuilt and expanded potable water treatment plant in West Linn,where extensive LID approaches are being used to manage stormwater.Within the Surface Water Utility, approximately 86% of the City's total surface water program is devoted to retrofits. Through FY20-21,this equates to a retrofit investment of$5.5 million. 10 July 1,2015 4.0 Identification of High Priority Retrofit Areas Recognizing that retrofit projects are considered within an overall City context for funding, it is worthwhile to articulate specific areas where retrofits opportunities should be prioritized, particularly as they relate to other City infrastructure. High priority retrofit areas consist of the following: • Commercial corridors adjacent to major and minor arterials (Figure 2), including downtown,where retrofit BMPs are focused on those that remove metals, hydrocarbons, and sediment. ODOT, for instance, prioritizes water quality retrofits on roads with more than 30,000 average daily traffic (ADT).7 These traffic volumes are only approached on Kruse Way, Boones Ferry Road in the Lake Grove commercial district, Country Club Road, and, presumably, State Street/OR 43 (Figure 3). Roadways with lower ADT are thought to present a lower stormwater pollution risk. For purposes of managing discharges to underground injection controls (UICs), DEQ regulations are stronger for traffic surfaces with more than 1,000 ADT. ODOT does not require stormwater treatment on roads with less than 750 ADT unless other circumstances warrant its inclusion.8 • Areas of older development where infill redevelopment is putting usage pressure on roadway shoulders that have traditionally been used for stormwater management, resulting in increased street drainage issues. • Areas of older development across the City where steep slopes accelerate the delivery of runoff to creeks, resulting in channel erosion. Retrofit projects may target reduction of hydromodification (e.g., detention ponds), reduction of impacts from hydromodification (e.g., channel stabilization and enhancement), or both. • Areas of slope instability related to City infrastructure in streamside locations. In addition to the risk to City infrastructure, retrofits that better manage water in these areas reduce loading of large volumes of sediment to the surface water system. • Areas with high value natural resources. This criteria favors projects in the Tryon Creek subbasin in general, because this is the single basin within the City currently known to support native anadromous salmonids protected under the Endangered Species Act. ODOT. ND. 2012-16 Stormwater Retrofit Program. http://www.oreeon.gov/ODOT/HWY/GEOENVIRONMENTAL/pages/stormwater retrofit program.aspx 8 ODOT.2006.Water quality mitigation.Operational notice PD-05.April 4. 11 July 1,2015 z _. J I 1 I I r y -�� _.. t ` !. City of Lake Oswego ZoningI r 1 J . f r IMI Commercial ( Industrial 7-"j rMixed Use 1Parks and Open Spaces (/ ;Residential-High Density !Residential-Medium Density �, _ , J it Residential-Low Density / ,. f/ :���� '. ' 7 ' *NO 11 �� ip. Functional Street Classes `1 r F. r 4- � ►�i —Freeway a Hwy Ramp i tiPIPf16 �� 7:-4 r � 1.�ti—Major Arterial —J—Minor Arterial III Y 3l.:, yl —Major Collector I 1 —1 4P ing p Neighborhood Collector s s �110 . , / irldi —Local t NM Mr ke Urban Service Boundary �,, y A r ^ Ulu. . i 4 AO4 ,o Lake *`�"" ' . ,__ A.._ iiri OS\N. AMOR lia. 1122 N. ,omom ff"" ..� .0,1 r ipOV - at...4.• 17 „a ill/ A A / ' 4*-.4 ' . -� r 211 i , w. 1 E- -I gip, _ lt,i, 0., LTA, • Rir�, s _ M ), _. • i k ,Z t '- -',--- ..---\ Tu la ' -' i o o.2s o.s I ter Miles Figure 2. Lake Oswego zoning and functional street classification 12 1 I I , . I __.y,111 ,__,1 14--L__ ,A...,___-_,_ . 2014 ADT �L� 'T�Portlyin N .+ _ m 35,000 } =30,000 —� f d i P 20,0004_. N ,t rpm rji s,000 'F' I � + r . !Y/ . _� '''' Data Source: S 3a N,g �1;,. r C#=Clackamas County . ik, +, , Oa 4� P#=Portland 4$3 p r' #=Lake Oswego 6 ��—� 381 18 t 4. 12 1 P H Z Urban Service Boundary 1 _ 44 ��� 1"z 35 f W °]3 f CityLimits •�- — .-,+- I fhb y�7 r —. r \` ..r S. 33 i - :3I 7 • U[t'd c3 o Lake 4 AZ-'1,41 ;' 1 K.-.--N.-t 5..,__- j- ..." yrF r Inz' S� „ .... 5, 01P M /'I Oilr 4 alps - P I 4..ii.i , --5 4 I 0. fr .:•• -c-Y � I v f l 53 LIdif '- f iri*___ThE _ .ft's I ,'s IN „,Vitt _jahaL ,..,r R9� 52 C9 1 5_____...\\ i , ',.,/ CB - + --1 1 ,I ,,,,,, 1111 1 cij LOW t..,...:r' . f ite i' / , C_J '-)L-_ __,_ it 9— l /),4? ...07,} -191 I " :04),-, 1.1 TaA[l!l U N" ç25 . t--. ' i_J ,i ) -I J I- - , ,Jam' Figure 3.2014 Average Daily Traffic(ADT)on Lake Oswego streets. 13 July 1,2015 • City facilities that are undergoing extensive exterior redevelopment such as the Operations Facility on Jean Road or the Water Treatment Plant in West Linn, where there is an opportunity to showcase LID and other approaches to treating stormwater in a high traffic commercial environment. 5.0 Retrofit Alternative Evaluation and Priority Project List 5.1 Consideration of New Storm water Control Measures Table 1 lists the ranked surface water capital projects from the 2015-2016 to 2020-2021 CIP, along with three in-progress or upcoming projects with substantial stormwater components: the City's potable water treatment plant located in West Linn, the Boones Ferry Road Improvement Project, and the replacement of the City's Operations Facility. Projects arising from the Clean Streams Plan and subsequently added to the City's CIP list are described in this and the following sections. Most of the surface water projects identified in the current CIP have a water quality or hydromodification mitigation component to them; these are listed in Table 2. 5.2 Preferred Structural Control Measures Upcoming changes in the City's stormwater code will favor LID/green infrastructure approaches wherever possible, at least for stormwater quality treatment, and reduce the impervious surface area triggering required stormwater treatment. Preferred structure types include swales, planters, and rain gardens. New City-sponsored projects are being designed to these new standards,though the standards have not been adopted yet by the City Council. Subsurface conditions that limit infiltration of stormwater, or of volumes associated with the water quantity storm, may require other facility types to manage overflows, including dry wells. Overflows to piped systems discharging to Oswego Lake,the Tualatin River, or the Willamette River,will not require management of water quantity. Several of the prioritized CIPs are surface detention facilities. These are located opportunistically (i.e.,where open parcels are available and in public ownership) and are not yet prioritized by area treated.As a last resort, subsurface detention vaults to handle water quantity can be coupled with filter-cartridge based BMPs to provide water quality treatment. Costs to adequately maintain these systems remain a barrier to their widespread use, but they are effective for many pollutants including bacteria. 5.3 Retrofit Project Priority List Table 2 presents the subset of projects listed in Table 1 that are water quality retrofit projects. This table also lists the primary pollutant class that each retrofit could be expected to manage based on the expected pollutants from the source area and the 14 July 1,2015 proposed retrofit structure. The locations of retrofit projects across the City are shown on Figure 4. Project labels on this figure are keyed to the CIP Rank on Tables 1 and 2. This figure also shows the location of the Kerr Parkway designated retrofit project. At an aggregated cost of over$14 million, this list represents well more than a decade of projects at the current rate of expenditure,with no allowance for emergency repairs of other surface water infrastructure such as aging culverts. City staff will continue to adaptively manage retrofit priorities based on the priorities articulated in Section 3.0 to allocate available resources toward this effort, identifying new projects as needs and opportunities arise. Surface water and development review staff actively follow research on BMP effectiveness and optimum BMP deployment strategies to determine the most appropriate BMP measures at the time of project design. Surface water engineering staff also actively coordinate with Operations staff to identify maintenance needs as a means of increasing stormwater treatment effectiveness of existing BMPs to limit the amount of needed re-design or reconstruction. The City's Engineering Department is structured to include staff responsible for roadways, pathways, the potable water distribution system and wastewater collection system, allowing opportunities for water quality retrofits to be identified early in the design process for other capital projects. Finally, Engineering Department staff coordinate closely with staff from Facilities, Parks and Recreation and the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency, allowing cost-effective stormwater retrofit components to be incorporated into projects managed by these departments. 15 July 1,2015 Table 1. Surface Water Project Prioritization FY15-16 to FY20-21, Ordered by Master CIP Rank Surface Water CIP Ranking Criteria and Score to c E al ++ al v .0 ar L x a, L 7 ._ u L al u � 1 w 4, 3 C E u L i C N C CC u al L N Y • 3 C Li)) C. J 3 E aH, + L �.a.i, + 2 -c o a .4-ris 0 L �- 0 la V Cost in c Q- Gil3 ! 'Fs w E t N ko 0 FY15-16 to o- u o =a .0 c`3a 4• - 3 L c ,n u FY20-21 CIP u a3 Q. c LL c L ? ▪ R s w u a` N 0 or CSP(2015 a, a u u 3 y m c 0. c O. $for CSP } a}' a}' c 0 3 y =a a c� . a 3 u_ C c +, v •� tiA a - a, 0- m o w 3 c Project Name/Location u, o Projects)1 SubBasin 1/1 c aL aL _u caLc2 2 E > Notes Rockinghorse Lane Drainage Improvements - $ 660,000 Tryon Creek Staff Y 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 10 1 Outfall improvements with 401 certification requirements TBD Cornell/Laurel/Bickner - $ 210,000 Willamette N 2 2 2 1 1 8 2 Tie to Laurel Pathway WO 191,which has SW requirements D Avenue Storm System (includes 1st St, E Avenue) TC5 &TC6 $ 802,000 Tryon Creek CSP Y 2 2 2 1 1 1 9 3 Includes E Avenue upgrade CSP/ Small Works Drainage Improvements ON $243,000 City-Wide Staff Y NR 4 Standing CIP item to reduce local street and public facility flooding Catch Basin Retrofits ON $ 243,000 City-Wide CSP Y 0 5 Replace unsumped catch basins with catch basins Ash Street to ODOT Drainage Imp.-Hwy 43 - $ 116,000 Willamette CIP Y 2 2 2 1 1 8 6 Drainage causing recurring slope failure to Hwy 43 ROW Replaces pipe under Country Club and rehabilitates existing pond,assuming Country Club Road near Dolph Court TC1 $ 435,000 Tryon Creek CSP Y 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 9 7 access is granted. Develop consistent management of conveyance and water quality along ROW as Goodall Ditch Redesign - $ 300,000 Tryon Creek Staff N 2 2 1 1 1 7 8 allowed by available space and grade Springbrook Creek culvert analysis SB6 $ 373,000 Springbrook CSP Y 9 9 Flood control study/modeling Upper Drive-west of Bryant - $ 325,000 Oswego Lake Y 2 1 1 4 10 Add stormwater infrastructure upon annexation. Bryant Road-frontage to Upper inc.Sunset - $ 175,000 Oswego Lake Y 2 1 1 4 11 Add conveyance and water quality.Space may be limited for quantity control Outfall Inventory& Restoration ON $ 300,000 City-Wide CSP Y 2 2 2 1 1 1 9 12 Evaluate stability and potential for treatment on existing outfalls routed to ravines Project funding extends beyond approved CIP list.Tied to annexation and new Regional SW Facility-Bergis/Stafford LD1 $ 671,000 Lost Dog Creek CSP N 2 2 2 1 1 8 13 development.Also referred to as"Regional Storm Facility-Lost Dog" Redfern Avenue Drainage Improvements - $ 193,000 Oswego Lake Y 2 1 3 14 Includes drainage improvements,UICs,and possible pervious pavement First Addition Neighborhood Catch Basins TC7 $ 125,000 Tryon Creek CSP N 2 2 1 1 1 7 15 Replace existing CBs with sumped and snouted CBs A Avenue Upgrade at Hwy 43 TC3 $ 125,000 Tryon Creek CSP N 2 2 2 1 7 16 Combine with TC4;conveyance upgrade only scheduled due to LOTigard B Avenue Storm System TC4 $ 595,000 Tryon Creek CSP Y 2 2 1 5 16 Combine with TC3;conveyance upgrade only scheduled due to LOTigard Lakeview Blvd Roadway& Drainage - $ 637,000 Oswego Lake Staff Y 2 2 1 1 1 1 8 17 Not including infiltration due to landslide potential;drains directly to Oswego Lake Incorporate treatment into road rebuild;coordinate with Parks activities in Wembley Park/Crest Drive - $ 215,000 Springbrook Y 2 1 1 1 1 1 7 18 Springbrook Park Project funding extends beyond approved CIP list.Focus on water quality not Blue Heron Rd Rehab& Drainage - $ 547,000 Oswego Lake Y 2 1 1 1 5 19 quantity;drains directly to Oswego Lake Storrmwater upgrades to City's pending LID-based stds.within ODOT Local Project Boones Ferry Road in Lake Grove area - - Oswego Lake LORA Y 2 2 1 1 6 R1 -proportion of$5.135M project not yet determined Operations Facility Replacement - - Oswego Lake staff Y NR F2 Stormwater improvement proportion of$13M budget not yet determined. Approach to be taken awaiting issuance of pending general small municipality UIC Decomissioning or Upstream Treatment ON $1,325,000 City-Wide CSP Y 1 0 U01 permit issuance Southwood Park(Mtn Park) BL2 $ 135,000 Ball Creek CSP Y 2 1 1 1 4 UO2 Add LID. 16 July 1,2015 Table 1. Surface Water Project Prioritization FY15-16 to FY20-21, Ordered by Master CIP Rank Surface Water CIP Ranking Criteria and Score oa c E cu +.• Q U v v ar L x a, L 3 ._ u L ar u " W Y in 3 c . E L i C N 0 fa u aJ L N a+ a) v� C 7 > y C to O. J §j E tO al 13 O t p L �i L a 0 O L C fa Q- O fa V Cost in c Q- to 3 ! 'fa w E -C N ,O 0 FY15-16 to a u 4-, 1/3 .0 al +, 3 L c ,n u FY20-21 CIP 3 •L o +. J� > O LLre CIS iT Z ��— x 4_, t3i E,-. O a Q LT- C Q fa w t� C i a N 0 or CSP(2015 a) a u u 3 a' fa o E L +� C a` $for CSP i } a}' CU a U c 0 % > CO y =a c� -V a 3 U. Q Q a+ -a •( tiA a — a) Q to 0 w 3 C Project Name/Location u, Li Projects)1 SubBasin °, c aL aL _" cac oc 2 Cue E > et rz 8 c en2 a2 Notes Bickner to McVey Stormwater Replacement — $ 450,000 Oswego Creek N NR UO3 Add LID. Tanglewood Drive Open Space(Mtn Park) SB2 $ 140,000 Springbrook CSP Y 2 1 3 U04 Add LID.May accelerate with Nature in Neighborhoods Metro grant Elizabeth M Gress Park(Mtn Park) SB4 $ 226,000 Springbrook CSP Y 2 1 3 U05 Add LID. Preakness Court Hammerhead (Mtn Park) SB1 $ 140,000 Springbrook CSP Y 2 2 1 1 1 7 U06 Add LID. Sediment Basin Retrofits ON, BC1-5 $ 404,000 Various CSP N 1 1 1 1 4 U07 Includes Blue Heron Canal,Southshore/Cedar,and Mt.Park Cherry Crest Detention &Municipal Golf Course LD2 $ 615,000 Lost Dog Creek CSP N 2 2 1 1 6 U08 Add parking lot/material management retrofit to CSP description Churchill Downs(Mtn Park) SB3 $ 53,000 Springbrook CSP Y 2 1 4 U09 Evaluation for drainage improvements,catch basin upgrades Touchstone Drive(Mtn Park) SB5 $ 89,000 Springbrook CSP Y 2 1 4 U10 Evaluation for drainage improvements,catch basin upgrades Melrose Street BL1 $ 265,000 Ball Creek CSP Y 2 1 1 1 5 U11 Regrade channel and revegetate riparian area Bayberry Road TC2 $ 604,000 Tryon Creek CSP Y 2 2 4 U12 Rebuild roadside swales Eena Road — $ 242,000 Oswego Lake Staff Y 0 U13 Solution for local flooding TBD Lower Boones Ferry-Lake Grove BF1 $3,260,000 Oswego Lake CSP Y 1 1 0 U14 Within urban services boundary.Add stormwater infrastructure upon annexation Water Reservoir Disconnect ON $ 721,000 City-Wide CSP Y 0 U15 Improve options for contingency overflows at 16 City reservoirs Regional Water Quality Facility Retrofit — $ 372,000 Oswego Lake Staff Y 1 1 1 3 U16 Rebuild of ODOT Built Lower BFR facilities between Pilkington and RR tracks Douglas Circle — $ 392,000 Springbrook Staff Y 0 U17 Capture local flooding and route to Springbrook Creek Install sediment sump at end of South Shore Blvd.Add to FY16-17 CIP.May add to South Shore/Blue Heron Sediment Ctrl. Facil. — ND Oswego Lake Staff N 1 1 1 3 NR Blue Heron Rd.rehab. Total $16,723,000 Notes: 1 Funded from Surface Water Utility unless noted NR Not ranked CIP Capital Improvement Plan ON ongoing activity described in Clean Streams Plan CSP Clean Streams Plan(City of Lake Oswego,2009) R1,F2 Rank in other CIP sections;R-Roadway&Bridge Improvements; F—Facilities.Not funded by surface water utility. ND Not determined U Unfunded 17 July 1,2015 Table 2. Water Quality Retrofit Project Prioritization FY15-16 to FY20-21, Ordered by Surface Water CIP Rank bp c N_ n W Cost in FY15- c . E' C4 a c a 16 to FY20-21 ac •v '3 E c to o CIP,FY14-15 a 13 ° a) v7 r ra u CIP,or CSP in 0 LL > Z .r a ° 0 o (2015$for v v m m > E w c a` Unfunded 5 r g Y % 3 0 3 y o 20. . Project Name/Location Projects)' Basin ,° c E g = Pollutants Targeted' cc Notes Tualatin & Project construction completed;now in plant establishment phase for LIDA Kerr Parkway Rehabilitation — $3,200,000 Springbrook Staff Y 1 1 2 2 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M 6 0 swales and planters. Rockinghorse Lane Drainage Improvements — $ 660,000 Tryon Creek Staff Y 2 2 2 1 1 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS 7 1 Outfall improvements with 401 certification requirements TBD Cornell/Laurel/Bickner — $ 210,000 Willamette Staff N 2 2 1 2 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M, B 6 2 Tie to Laurel Pathway WO 191,which has SW requirements that will use LID D Avenue Storm System (includes 1st St, E Avenue) TC5 &TC6 $ 802,000 Tryon Creek CSP Y 2 1 1 1 2 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M, B 6 3 Includes E Avenue upgrade;LID pavement solutions contemplated Catch Basin Retrofits ON $ 243,000 City-Wide CSP Y 1 1 P, Hg, DO/TSS, HC, M 1 5 Standing CIP item to reduce local street and public facility flooding Replaces pipe under Country Club and rehabilitates existing pond,assuming Country Club Road near Dolph Court TC1 $ 435,000 Tryon Creek CSP Y 1 1 2 P, Hg, DO/TSS, B 4 7 access is granted. Develop consistent management of conveyance and water quality along ROW Goodall Ditch Redesign — $ 300,000 Tryon Creek Staff N 2 1 1 1 P, Hg,TSS 5 8 as allowed by available space and grade Upper Drive-west of Bryant — $ 325,000 Oswego Lake Staff Y 1 1 1 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M, B 3 10 Add stormwater infrastructure upon annexation. Bryant Road—frontage to Upper inc.Sunset — $ 175,000 Oswego Lake Staff Y 1 1 P, Hg, DO/TSS, HC, M 2 11 Add conveyance and water quality.Space may be limited for quantity control Evaluate stability and potential for treatment on existing outfalls routed to Outfall Inventory& Restoration ON $ 300,000 City-Wide CSP Y 2 1 1 1 1 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, M 6 12 ravines Lost Dog Project funding extends beyond approved CIP list.Tied to annexation and new Regional SW Facility-Bergis/Stafford LD1 $ 671,000 Creek CSP Y 2 2 P, Hg, DO/TSS, M 4 13 development.Also referred to as"Regional Storm Facility-Lost Dog" Redfern Avenue Drainage Improvements — $ 193,000 Oswego Lake Staff Y 2 1 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M, B 3 14 Includes drainage improvements,UlCs,and possible pervious pavement First Addition Neighborhood Catch Basins TC7 $ 125,000 Tryon Creek CSP N 2 1 P, Hg, DO/TSS 3 15 Replace existing CBs with sumped and snouted CBs Not including infiltration due to landslide potential;drains directly to Oswego Lakeview Blvd Roadway& Drainage — $ 637,000 Oswego Lake Staff Y 1 1 P, Hg, DO/TSS, HC, M 2 17 Lake Incorporate treatment into road rebuild;coordinate with Parks activities in Wembley Park/Crest Drive — $ 215,000 Springbrook Staff Y 2 1 1 2 2 P, Hg, DO/TSS 8 18 Springbrook Park Project funding extends beyond approved CIP list.Focus on water quality not Blue Heron Rd Rehab& Drainage — $ 547,000 Oswego Lake CSP N 1 2 P, Hg, DO/TSS 3 19 quantity;drains directly to Oswego Lake Storrmwater upgrades to City's pending LID-based stds.within ODOT Local Boones Ferry Road in Lake Grove area — — Oswego Lake LORA Y 2 2 1 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M, B 5 R1 Project—proportion of$5.135M project not yet determined Operations Facility Replacement — — Oswego Lake Staff Y 2 2 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M 4 F2 Stormwater improvement proportion of$13M budget not yet determined. P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M Approach to be taken awaiting issuance of pending general small municipality UIC Decomissioning or Upstream Treatment ON $1,325,000 City-Wide CSP Y 2 1 3 U01 permit issuance Southwood Park(Mtn Park) BL2 $ 135,000 Ball Creek CSP Y 2 1 2 1 2 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M 7 UO2 Add LID. M DO/TSS, Hg, , HC, Tanglewood Drive Open Space(Mtn Park) SB2 $ 140,000 Springbrook CSP Y 2 2 2 P, 6 UO3 Add LID.May accelerate with Nature in Neighborhoods Metro grant Elizabeth M Gress Park(Mtn Park) SB4 $ 226,000 Springbrook CSP Y 2 2 1 2 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M 6 U04 Add LID. Preakness Court Hammerhead (Mtn Park) SB1 $ 140,000 Springbrook CSP Y 2 1 2 1 2 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M 7 U05 Add LID. Sediment Basin Retrofits ON, BC1-5 $ 404,000 Various Staff Y 1 1 P, Hg, DO/TSS, HC, M 2 U06 Includes Blue Heron Canal,Southshore/Cedar,and Mt.Park 18 July 1,2015 Table 2. Water Quality Retrofit Project Prioritization FY15-16 to FY20-21, Ordered by Surface Water CIP Rank ea C a, N_ 7 W != X 3 E C Cost in FY15- c . a£i ce Q. c a 16 to FY20-21 ac '3 v v o n' �= a 3 ns N r�-1 o CIP,FY14-15 u o u ce L Lil u CIP,or CSP in 0 W z Z .a 15 ° 0 o (2015$for w Cr v m m > 0 w c a` Unfunded r = Y c 3 0 3 y 2 20. Project Name/Location Projects)' Basin „°, c E > 3 > Pollutants Targeted' cc Notes Lost Dog Cherry Crest Detention &Municipal Golf Course LD2 $ 615,000 Creek Staff Y 2 2 P, Hg, DO/TSS, HC, M, B 4 U07 Add parking lot/material management retrofit to CSP description Churchill Downs(Mtn Park) SB3 $ 53,000 Springbrook CSP Y 2 1 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M 3 U08 Evaluation for drainage improvements,catch basin upgrades Touchstone Drive(Mtn Park) SB5 $ 89,000 Springbrook CSP Y 2 1 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M 3 U09 Evaluation for drainage improvements,catch basin upgrades Melrose Street BL1 $ 265,000 Ball Creek CSP Y 2 1 1 2 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, M, B 6 U11 Regrade channel and revegetate riparian area Bayberry Road TC2 $ 604,000 Tryon Creek CSP Y 2 1 1 P, Hg, DO/TSS, HC, M 4 U12 Rebuild roadside swales Eena Road — $ 242,000 Oswego Lake Staff Y 1 1 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M 2 U12 Local flooding and treatment solution TBD Within urban services boundary.Add stormwater infrastructure upon Lower Boones Ferry-Lake Grove — $3,260,000 Oswego Lake Staff Y 1 1 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M, B 2 U14 annexation Water Reservoir Disconnect ON $ 721,000 City-Wide CSP Y 1 2 P, Hg, DO/TSS, HC, M 3 U15 Improve options for contingency overflows at 16 City reservoirs Regional Water Quality Facility Retrofit — $ 372,000 Oswego Lake CSP Y 1 1 1 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, HC, M, B 3 U16 Rebuild of ODOT Built Lower BFR facilities between Pilkington and RR tracks Install sediment sump at end of South Shore Blvd.prior to discharge to Oswego South Shore/Blue Heron Sediment Ctrl. Facil. — ND Oswego Lake Staff N 1 2 P, Hg,T, DO/TSS, M 2 NR Lake.Add to FY16-17 CIP Total $14,429,000 Notes: 1 Funded from Surface Water Utility unless noted 2 Scoring: 2—High:serves large area with effective treatment,has high potential to mitigate existing or future hydromodification impacts;1—Medium:serves smaller area,has limited treatment,or uncertain or moderate hydromodification potential;0—No additional treatment or hydromodification Pollutants: P=phosphorus;Hg=mercury;T=temperature;DO/TSS=dissolved oxygen and total suspended sediment(DO surrogate);HC=hydrocarbons;note that treatments useful for hydrocarbons also are applicable for other organic compounds such as pesticides; M=metals,primarily 3 copper and zinc; B=bacteria CIP Capital Improvement Plan CSP Clean Streams Plan(City of Lake Oswego,2009) ND Not determined NR Not ranked R1,F2 Rank in other CIP sections;R-Roadway&Bridge Improvements;F—Facilities.Not funded by surface water utility. ON ongoing activity described in Clean Streams Plan U Unfunded 19 July 1,2015 / i f uo7c i i7f Uo6• • Uo9 1 / j 0 • U ' , Uo4 KERB PKWY.• /�UO2' U11 (DESIGNATED 0 - ..—__' PRJ.) U10— 0 8 ' O \ 7 Utz 36 • Q �/ 3A • 0150 \,....1 / . P 3� :. Z,._____- 18 �j 3D f110 _Cd-0 �, Ra it �7 j ake � , /// U14A • (.L'.' .":/__ 7 Os, Uo7B `i I....-,:; '- U14A• to r r$ , 3.9 • r`rUi4A Uo8B l ����� U16 U�3 `NR �3 1 1 / 14 U Uo7A F1 • f U084 A .— N f Uo7A 'r . .... 00 1 or FYa5-1�P Rank Willamette River +1 ro Retrofit Projects Tryon Creek �I I l4si,,, . imarem r - Permit Area Tualatin River L/ N : : ?f O _ �i" v-cl p - r Streams Oswego Lake 1 ---,------\ _ Springbrook Creek 0 0'25 .5 0.75 a _ /Miles \ H 15vrfa[e W etePRegulatorylMSp PER M1TlAdd Nona!Requlrereents Retrofit ProgramlretfofltCI P mxd e63m5 am Figure 4. Locations of Lake Oswego's designated and CIP prioritized retrofit projects.See Table 2 for key to additional project details linked to this figure by CIP rank. 20 July 1,2015 THE RIVER \ STARTS HERS LAKE OSWEGO wa r Stewardship for a Sustainable Future