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March 2021 2020 Year in ReviewCity of Lake Oswego www.LakeOswego.city 503-635-02572020YEAR INreview City of Lake Oswego City Manager’s Office In the Council-Manager form of government, the city manager is appointed by the City Council to serve as the City’s chief administrative officer. The City Manager’s Office houses the Public Affairs Office, City Recorder’s Office, and programs for Sustainability and Emergency Planning & Management. The City Manager also serves as the Executive Director of the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency. COVID-19 Response Throughout 2020 and the City’s COVID-19 response, the health, safety, and wellbeing of our community was a top priority. From utility assistance programs to business assistance grants to virtual programming, we remained committed to finding innovative and creative ways to serve our community. As we faced COVID-19 together, it is abundantly clear that we are strongest when we work together as a community - even from a distance. Diversity, Equity, Inclusion The Diversity, Equity, Inclusion (DEI) Task Force work went underway in 2020. During the year, the Task Force conducted research, focus groups, and surveys to address the broader set of questions focusing on: X Changes in community engagement practices. X Ways to make City facilities and services more welcoming to diverse people. X How can we hire, train, retain, and support a diverse workforce? X Ways to build relationships with people and groups who haven’t been traditionally involved with City services. The final community-centered report with recommendations was presented to City Council in December. As a part of their 2021 Council goals, the new City Council have directed staff to “implement the ‘overarching’ recommendations of the DEI Task Force.” The City produced a number of Shop Local videos to help support Lake Oswego businesses. Message from the Mayor A few City highlights from 2020 2020 Council Goal Accomplishments Even through adapting to 2020 challenges, City Council and staff continued to prioritize provided high quality city-services every day. Council completed initiatives include: X Overseeing the City Hall project X Adopting the Climate Action Plan X Approving the project list for the voter-passed Lake Oswego Parks Bond X Beginning work to comply with HB 2001 and HB 2003 X Developing a cultural events calendar Many goals that were adopted by the City Council for 2021 are building upon and enhancing many of the goals from the last year. Lake Oswego’s story is of a town re-inventing itself in the face of challenge and changing times. Not surprisingly Oswegans of today demonstrated the same spirit of resilience and fortitude as did Oswegans of the past when we collectively experienced a year unlike any other. In 2020, we saw tremendous support for community members in need: organizations like the Lakewood Center and Rotary organized constant support of local restaurants, individuals supported neighbors in need with donations to Hunger Fighters and other non-profits, the City provided business grants and relief programs to residents. In 2020, community members also stood up for racial justice and for one another. In 2020, we learned that even in the most challenging of times we can continue moving forward. Last year, the City also moved forward on a number of significant projects. We are near completion of our new City Hall building, we partnered with the Lake Oswego School District to commence planning for a community recreation and pool facility, made immense progress on the Boones Ferry Road project, completed two new City parks, and worked hard to set an example to keep everyone safe. We have much to look forward to in the year to come, and may we allow the inspiration of our past accomplishments amidst a tumultuous year propel us as we grow together and rebuild in the year to come. Planning & Building Even though City facilities were closed to walk-in traffic as a result of the pandemic, the Building and Planning Departments, including the Permit Center, continued to assist permit customers via phone and email. Assisting Local BusinessIn addition to ensuring continued City operations, the Planning Department also identified innovative ways to support businesses through the pandemic. To support our local Lake Oswego business community, the City Council approved the use of $250,000 for a one-time Business Assistance Grant Program aimed at assisting Lake Oswego’s small businesses impacted by the COVID-19 crisis. This resulted in aiding and supporting 118 Lake Oswego businesses. Roughly 60% of the grants were awarded to businesses with 1-5 employees. Additionally, through Business Oregon, the State provided the City with an additional $138,000 to disburse to Lake Oswego small businesses that had not received Federal CARES Act funding. These funds have helped maintain a diverse array of small businesses and sole proprietorships that are woven into the fabric of the Lake Oswego community. Lastly, City Council approved code amendments that would further aid the business community, without compromising public safety. Signage allowances were made to help businesses let patrons know they are still open. In addition, canopies and temporary shelters were made permissible for certain commercial use during the pandemic. These changes, like expanded restaurant seating areas, allow businesses some relief to safely increase capacity, while maintaining physical distancing requirements. In Lake Oswego, we continue to be open for business!Expanded outdoor restaurant seating area. Year In Review2020 City of Lake Oswego www.LakeOswego.city 503-635-0257 Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency This has been a busy year for the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency, marking significant progress with two major projects in the East End Urban Renewal District (URD) and one in the Lake Grove Urban Renewal District (URA). East End URD Public Works Through all the challenges that 2020 brought, the Public Works Department was able to continue to provide essential services to the residents of Lake Oswego. This includes water distribution, wastewater collection, street and stormwater maintenance, city beautification and internal services for the City’s fleet. Along with completing preventative and reactive maintenance work, several projects were the highlight of the year. Water – AMI Project ContinuesThe installation of wirelessly read water meters continued in 2020. The City’s AMI project upgrades outdated, manually read water meters, with new, wirelessly read meters. Though progress was slowed due to COVID-19, crews were still able to install around 1,000 new meters, primarily in the western part of town. Internal software was set up, allowing staff to monitor usage and gather reads from all AMI meters. Work is nearly complete to integrate real time data into the City’s utility billing payment portal, which will allow water customers to be more informed about their water usage. For more information about the AMI project, visit: www.lakeoswego.city/publicworks/smart-water-meter-project. Wastewater – Accessing and Root Cutting ProgramNot all of the City’s infrastructure lies beneath the streets! Many of the City’s wastewater lines run “cross-country”: through backyards, parks, on the shores of Oswego Lake, and other hard to access locations. Inspection and maintenance of these pipes is difficult; the City’s wastewater crew has focused on gaining access, inspecting, and maintaining these hard to reach sewer manholes and lines throughout the year. The crew systematically cleaned and televised lines. Camera footage allowed staff to inspect the inside of the pipe for obstructions, cracks, and root intrusion. As you can imagine, off road pipes have a lot of roots! After gaining access and inspecting lines, crews then focused on root cutting and chemical root treatment work to keep the pipes cleared and flowing, preventing blockages and backups. 133 pipe segments of differing sizes received root cutting work, totaling approximately 23,000 feet. Chemical root treatment was completed on 18,000 feet of pipe. Streets – Streetlight LED ConversionCity of Lake Oswego streetlights are now completely LED! Throughout the past several years, our City Electricians have worked to convert or swap all of the City’s 3,000 streetlights to LED, and the last phase of the project is now complete. Through the LED streetlights project, the City has been able to save money and energy, while simultaneously increasing safety and visibility along roadways. The LED lights consume about 50 percent less energy when compared to their HPS luminaire predecessors, and have a longer lifespan. This translates to ongoing savings in maintenance costs. Switching to LED streetlights will save the City approximately $215,000 in electricity costs each year. City electricians installing new LED streetlights. Engineering & Water Treatment Plant 2020 was a historic year of crises, one in which we all had to make adjustments on how we operate – our Engineering department was no exception. Through every emergency our engineers, technicians, water treatment plant operators, inspectors, crew members, project managers, and administrative staff have continued to deliver essential services to our Lake Oswego community. We were grateful and proud to continue active construction on many of our city projects, keeping the water flowing from our water treatment plant, helping the local economy to stay moving, and providing essential, well-maintained infrastructure to our residents and businesses. Stormwater, sewer, water, utilities, roadway pavement, traffic control devices, lighting, pedestrian crossings, sidewalks – all essential infrastructure that have become even more critical during the coronavirus public health crisis. Major accomplishments, highlights, milestones and projects undertaken during 2020 include: X Reconstructed the entire one mile length of Wembley Park Road and replaced the stormwater system to provide better drainage and improve water quality X Produced clean, safe, and reliable drinking water at our water treatment plant. Plant staff worked 24/7 during the wildfires keeping our water treatment plant fully functional and increasing production to aid neighboring water systems with water supply. They helped ensure our community and region had enough water available for fire suppression, to support firefighting efforts, and the life safety of our neighbors who were heavily impacted by the fires. X Created an interactive ‘open for business’ map to help support local businesses impacted during the pandemic, and updated new features in our Lake Oswego mapping system through our GIS team X Developed COVID-19 safety protocols for inspections and switched to virtual and online review of most permits and applications X Paved more than 8 miles of roadway, slurry sealing over 15 miles of roadway, installing more than 100 ADA curb ramps, and pouring about half a mile of new sidewalk. X Built a new pump station at the corner of 10th Street and C Avenue X Completed undergrounding all overhead utilities between Madrona Street and Reese Road, as part of the Boones Ferry Project improvements X Issued more than 1,000 traffic control and street opening permits X Installed new water, stormwater, sewer pipes, and traffic signal heads Before - looking south at Wembley and Uplands Elementary. After - looking south at Wembley and Uplands Elementary. New pavement, updated signs and speed bumps. New City Hall approximately one month before move in. North Anchor ProjectThe North Anchor redevelopment site at First Street and B Avenue continue to move closer to development of a mixed-use project anchored by a boutique hotel. Urban Development + Partners (UDP), the Redevelopment Agency’s development partner in the project, has partnered with Mosaic Hotel Group to bring a unique boutique hotel experience to downtown Lake Oswego. The project will also include approximately 75 apartment units, ground floor retail and on-site parking. The Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency Board will receive project updates over the next several months. A land use application and disposition and development agreement with follow later in the year. Lake Grove URA Boones Ferry Road Project The Boones Ferry Road Project envisioned transforming the roadway into a safe and inviting pedestrian and business friendly area on the west side of Lake Oswego. Despite all the challenges 2020 brought, our Boones Ferry Project team were thankful to continue making great progress every day on essential infrastructure that is part of the project improvements. In fall, the project reached a major milestone by completing the highly complex utility undergrounding effort between Madrona Street and Reese Road. The project is well past the halfway mark with overall construction on track for completion in late 2021! For more information, or to sign-up for construction news visit boonesferryproject.org. City Hall ProjectMajor milestones for the City Hall Project for 2020 include completion of the building exterior cladding, glazing and moving City departments into the new City Hall in March 2021. The move signals the end of Phase 1 of the project and the beginning of Phase 2, deconstruction of the old City Hall and construction of the upper parking lot and civic plaza. Phase 2 will begin in April 2021 and be completed by the end of August. Year In Review2020 City of Lake Oswego www.LakeOswego.city 503-635-0257 Fire The Lake Oswego Fire Department provides Fire, EMS, Rescue, and Fire prevention/ investigation/inspection services to the City of Lake Oswego and three contract districts. In 2020, firefighters faced many changes and challenges including the COVID-19 pandemic and wildfires close to home. COVID-19 During the pandemic Lake Oswego firefighters changed the way they approached all medical emergencies and the way we live and work together, both on and off the job. All patient contact required an elevated level of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) worn and some of our medical procedures had to be administered differently to protect both the responders and the patients. The fire department worked diligently to acquire PPE throughout this pandemic and currently has enough to provide protection to our firefighters for up to 2 months in the event of a supply chain interruption. Donations were received from the community that helped with the ability for firefighters to respond safely in the beginning when supplies were short. With these donations the Fire Department was able to provide our local care facilities and some business’ with PPE so they could continue to work safely. Clackamas County Wildfires On September 7, 2020 an extreme heat and wind event provided conditions for devastating fires to start throughout Clackamas County and many other parts of Oregon. Lake Oswego firefighters worked for several weeks to help our neighboring departments combat the fires. This year several of our firefighters became certified to lead crews in wildland firefighting. This training along with some new equipment allowed our firefighters to safely and effectively make a difference in containing these devastating fires. In addition to the local fires, some of our firefighters contributed to fighting large fires in other parts of the state as members of an incident management team or as Strike Team leaders fighting fire on the front lines. Recruits 2020 This year we said good bye to several of our long term employees as they retired. As a result of these retirements we hired 6 new employees who bring to us a wide range of firefighting experience. They completed an 8-week training academy and then were assigned to a crew as they worked through their training goals for the next year. Training In addition to putting on an 8-week recruit academy the training division revamped many training programs and is providing a lot of hands-on training in addition to introducing new equipment and techniques. Much of this training ensures that we are able to work seamlessly with neighboring fire departments as we try to standardize regionally. The training division has introduced two new training events to help employees prepare for future promotions. A Driver/Engineer academy was developed and conducted in the spring of 2020 and a Company Officer leadership academy was developed and scheduled but moved to 2021 due to the pandemic. Special Recognition Two Lake Oswego Fire Department members received significant awards in 2020. Training Officer “Coach” Carlson was recognized and honored by the Northwest Association of Fire Trainers in October by being named Fire Trainer of the Year. This is recognizing all that Coach Carlson does. He not only works with and trains up our members but he is also part of the Clackamas County Regional Water Rescue Team where he is instrumental in training many of the boat operators in the region. Fire Marshal Gert Zoutendijk received the Golden Sparky award from the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal (OSFM). Each year, the OSFM recognizes exemplary service through its annual Golden Sparky award. These awards represent the best of service and honor the work of fire service professionals. FM Zoutendijk helped to secure a $250,000 grant from the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Authority for the department and plays an important role within the city in respects to fire safety. Police With services ranging from emergency response to police and critical medical calls, to criminal investigations, to working with our kids, the Police Department is committed to serving the Lake Oswego community. With highly trained dispatchers and police officers, the Police Department is ready to respond to any emergency with confidence, keeping our community safe. Adult Resource Officer Change After 18 years of law enforcement service, Adult Resource Officer Dawn Pecoraro honorably retired in September of 2020. Unique to law enforcement, the ARO serves as a liaison with the City’s older population, persons with physical and/or mental health issues, and those experiencing difficulties with substance abuse by connecting them to appropriate state and local entities specializing in health and wellness, drug use interdiction and other quality of life programs. Officer Pecoraro helped develop this one-of-a-kind position into a great community asset where she was able to help many of the vulnerable members of our community. She is succeeded by Officer Tony Sparling, a 14-year veteran of the department and an officer who embodies the same community assistance goals as his predecessor. Medication Delivery Assistance In March 2020 the Police Department launched a Prescription Delivery Pilot Project; a free prescription delivery service for older local community members or those who had any serious underlying medical condition that would put them at a higher risk of severe illness due to COVID-19. During the early months of Governor Brown’s executive order to stay home officers made numerous deliveries, wearing personal protective equipment and following social distancing guidelines to avoid spreading the virus. Those that participated were thankful for the service saying they were relieved that they didn’t have to go out themselves. Wildfires During the week of September 7, Oregon, like much of the west coast, was battling unprecedented and catastrophic wildfires that devasted communities. Danger to metro and surrounding areas increased, threatening tens of thousands in the fires’ paths. Lake Oswego Police, along with other first responders, jumped into action to help however they could. Days off were canceled and staff was called back to service in 12-hour disaster staffing shifts. Beyond the extra coverage for our city, LOPD officers responded to Molalla to assist local first responders with evacuations as the fires threatened their community. LOPD officers also covered patrol shifts for the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office so their deputies could focus on evacuations. As the fires spread, the Clackamas County Communications Dispatch Center (CCOM) in Oregon City had to evacuate due to the wildfire threat. With the assistance of our Lake Oswego Communications Center (LOCOM) and IT Department a temporary call taking center was set up in the police department conference room and City Hall lunchroom. For almost two weeks all 9-1-1 and non-emergency calls for Clackamas County came into Lake Oswego. Dispatchers from both LOCOM and CCOM worked long shifts with limited days off. The dedication and professionalism of the entire LOCOM staff ensured that the community continued to receive the high level of service they are accustomed to. Lake Oswego's Adult Resource Officer Tony Sparling began his police career in 1998. Officer Mayr assisting with medication delivery during pandemic. PPE donations from the Oregon Chinese American Community. LO firefighters helped neighboring departments combat wildfires. Year In Review2020 City of Lake Oswego www.LakeOswego.city 503-635-0257 Administrative Services X The Human Resources Department is responsible for a full range of comprehensive human resource services and programs to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the organization. These responsibilities include recruitment and selection, benefits administration, classification and compensation, labor relations, training, safety and workers’ compensation, risk management, performance management, and conflict resolution. X The Finance Department provides professional financial services and information to the City Manager, City Council, and City departments in order to promote fiscal stability and integrity. In addition to providing financial services relating to accounting and payroll, this department prepares the annual budget, works with the City’s auditors to prepare the annual audit and Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, performs utility billing and fee analysis, prepares fund projections to support future bond needs, manages the City’s investments and debts, and explores alternative sources of funding. It serves the public through accepting passport applications and issuance or renewal of business and dog licenses. X The Information Technology Department provides computer, network and communications support, and copy and mail center services to all City departments. Additionally, the Department supports mobile and fixed computers that are part of the 911 Center servicing the city of Lake Oswego and the Police Departments of West Linn and Milwaukie. X The City Attorney’s Office provides legal advice and representation to the City Council, the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency, the City Manager, the City staff and various City boards and commissions in all areas, including constitutional law, municipal law, land use, public contracting, public records, public meetings, urban renewal, code enforcement, tort liability, civil rights, taxation and municipal finance. The Office provides advice at public meetings, prepares legal opinions, contracts, intergovernmental agreements, ordinances and resolutions, and handles real property transactions. In addition, the Office prosecutes criminal misdemeanors, traffic cases, and City Code violations in the Lake Oswego Municipal Court. X The Municipal Court adjudicates City code violations, Oregon motor vehicle law violations, and misdemeanor criminal code violations in Lake Oswego. The Municipal Judge is appointed by the City Council and oversees the Municipal Court. Library The award-winning Lake Oswego Public Library offers materials, services, programs and events to educate and delight all ages. With a mission to inspire life-long learning, foster community, and improve quality of life, library staff pivoted as quickly as possible in response to the events of 2020 to develop safe ways to continue delivering on our mission. Providing high-quality information sources was essential, with librarians helping residents find authoritative virus and health guidance information, pandemic relief programs, social services, educational support materials, and so much more. L. O. Reads Lake Oswego began the year reading Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore, with programs expanding on the themes of the book and opportunities for the community to discuss the impacts of climate change. Library Services in a Pandemic When the pandemic shifted our environment in mid-March, library staff needed to adjust service delivery models in order to meet community needs under new safety guidelines. Programs and events moved to a virtual environment, and access was expanded to e-books, e-audiobooks, and streaming films. To support residents without technology at home, the Friends of the Library helped us purchase laptops that library cardholders can now borrow, along with wifi hotspots. Residents can also access free internet and print wirelessly from the library parking lot. Figuring out how to restore materials lending took some time, and staff appreciated the community’s patience. Following national, research-based materials handling guidelines, our county library district implemented a quarantine procedure and books began to flow between libraries and residents once more. Outdoor holds pickup has been going strong since May, with hours expanded to evenings and weekends, and demand nearly tripled. Residents also have the option to request home delivery of holds. From July through mid-November, librarians staffed our “Parking Lot Library” booths, offering services such as limited browsing and borrowing, reading recommendations, tech help, youth programs, craft kits, and more, to over 6K people. In the past six months, the library is very proud to have provided a monthly average of over 41K materials into the hands of our community. Outreach services to LOSD and homebound residents are another example of how library staff support the community and connect people with books and learning opportunities – and have a lot of fun doing it. Please visit www.lopl.org, follow us on social media, or sign up for our e-newsletter to stay informed about library services. Parks & Recreation Living Well ConnectedA virtual network of activities was developed and presented to keep the LO community engaged during the pandemic. There were over 70 virtual courses offered, over 4,000 participants, 2,400 views with 55 hours of content. Numerous Park Projects Commenced in 2020 X Roehr Park trail improvement and bridge are complete. X Iron Mountain Park is completed and open now! A picnic shelter, play area, and restroom along with Soft Surface Trails await visits and enjoyment. X Woodmont Natural Park is also now open and provides access to nature play and an artful nest set back in the woods ready for discovery. X Rehabilitation is also underway at the Adult Community Center and Stevens Meadow property. X As part of Parks bond, an architectural and engineering contract is in negotiation for a multi-sport field at the Rassekh property. X Repairs were made at the Swim Park. X A memorandum of understanding was signed to continue the design of the Recreation and Aquatics Center. The renovation and design of a 9-hole Executive Golf Course, the driving range, and design and construction of a course maintenance facility will coincide with the Recreation and Aquatics Center development. Other Achievements X Parks staff worked to keep sites open and safe and spent 2,505 hours patrolling waterfront properties and educating visitors on COVID-19 guidelines and park rules. X The Lake Oswego Golf Course witnessed an increase of 51% in rounds played and instituted two new programs--Swing King Hole in One on hole #9 and GolfPay reservation system. X The Adult Community Center Meals on Wheels services continued throughout the pandemic and a drive through lunch program was implemented. Respite Services pivoted to offering Zoom classes. The Living Well Talk Series aired to over 550,000+ cable subscribers, was shown 1,350 times and viewed 2,328 times on social media. Nicolette Hume, Community Engagement Coordinator, is the first Native American host on Tualatin Valley TV. X The Lake Oswego Farmers’ Market and the Holiday Market operated safely under OHA guidance to provide access to healthy local foods. Outdoor Fitness & Recreation and Alder Creek Kayak saw increases in rentals and classes at George Rogers Park. X Luscher Farm developed a partnership with Hunger Fighters to collect Adopt-a- Plot and Community Gardener produce donations, and Community Supported Agriculture participation increased 127%. Flicks at the Farm, the first ever drive- in movies at Luscher, included Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, Toy Story 4, and Onward. X Sports and Tennis Camps were successfully held during summer and the Special Olympics program had nearly 100% participation with the help of instructor Gerri Allen and volunteers. X The Arts Council moved and reopened ARTspace with a Holiday Marketplace and exhibitions: Gathering | Pattern a survey of basketry; Plein Air - Chronicling 2020; Delta Hill Riders - Photography by Rory Doyle. Woodmont Natural Park