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April 2021 Community ForestryForestryUrban & CommUnityApril 2021 arbor month Arbor Day is America’s National Tree Holiday, observed on the last Friday of April to celebrate the role of trees in our lives and to promote tree planting and care. For the first time ever, the City Council has proclaimed the entire month of April as Lake Oswego Arbor Month, following Governor Kate Brown’s state-wide proclamation of Oregon Arbor Month. Visit lakeoswego.city/planning to read the City’s proclamation. Find out more about Oregon Arbor Month at oregoncommunitytrees.org. The City looks forward to celebrating trees with Urban & Community Forestry Workshops, Heritage Tree Dedications, Heritage Tree Walking Tours, and other in-person events and activities in the near future. In the meantime, a variety of less formal, socially-distanced activities are being brought to you by the Parks and Recreation Department, Lake Oswego Public Library (LOPL), and Oswego Lake Watershed Council (OLWC). Celebrating 32 years Tree City USA For 32 years, the City of Lake Oswego has earned Tree City USA (TCUSA) designation from the National Arbor Day Foundation. The TCUSA program recognizes cities for demonstrating a strong commitment to managing and caring for trees. Cities earn TCUSA status by meeting four standards: maintaining a tree board (the Parks, Recreation and Natural Resources Advisory Board), having a tree ordinance, spending a minimum $2 per capita on urban forest management, and proclaiming and celebrating Arbor Day annually. There are currently 69 TCUSA communities across Oregon. Visit www.arborday.org/programs/treecityusa to learn more. For more information on Arbor Week or Urban and Community Forestry events, visit www.lakeoswego.city/planning, email planning@lakeoswego.city, or call 503-635-0290. Ways to CelebrateTree Pruning WorkshopSaturday, April 24, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Foothills Park Pavilion, 199 Foothills Road Understand why, what, and how to prune to develop healthy, strong, and attractive trees and shrubs. Explore pruning types, proper cutting tools and techniques, and tree responses to pruning. This workshop is led by ISA Board Certified Master Arborist Damon Schrosk of Treecology, Inc. Pre-registration is required and capacity is limited to 20 Lake Oswego residents due to social-distancing measures. Please call 503-635-0290 or email planning@lakeoswego.city for free registration. Explore Our Parks Throughout Arbor Month, visit parks across the City and keep your eyes peeled for displays highlighting individual trees with fun facts and maybe a joke or two. How many can you find? When you find one, take a picture and post it on social media by tagging @cityoflakeoswego and using the hashtag #LOArborMonth. Go explore! The Gnomes in Nature Hunt is Back The wily Stewardship Gnomes, Blossom, Greenie and Oak, will hide in three different natural area parks from April to October. Come out and find them, you may win a prize! Here’s what to do: • Find three gnomes in three natural park areas from April to October. • Take a photo of you, your dog or anything by a gnome! • Post your gnome photos on social media using the hashtags #LOparksgnomes for a chance to win your very own gnome in October. Visit lo-stewardship.org for monthly park locations, gnome clues, and to learn more about each gnome and the City’s 460 acres of natural park areas. Read below to find out where the Stewardship Gnomes will be hiding during Arbor Month. April Locations • Foothills Park - Wave to bald eagles that soar overhead as you hunt for gnomes along the Willamette River path! The three clever gnomes may peek out from trees or be near native species, like redosier dogwood and salal. Enjoy reading poetry etched on tall basalt columns near the path. Location: 199 Foothills Road. • River Run Park – This tucked away 7-acre natural park hosts winding trails above the Tualatin River. Cross the footbridge and pass by native species, like mock orange and Pacific ninebark, as you search for gnomes. Look up in the trees for frequently seen northern flicker, osprey and red-tailed hawks! Location: 19698 River Run Drive. • Stevens Meadows – Our three friends in red pointy hats love this 20.5-acre natural area with sweeping views of the Stafford landscape. Follow the meadow trail and cross a footbridge as you pass by native Oregon white oaks. If you’re quiet, you may spot some black-tailed deer and brush rabbits! Location: 18600 Shirley Drive. learn aboUt trees, Wildlife and the great oUtdoors Celebrate Arbor Month with a book! LOPL librarians have carefully compiled Arbor Month-themed book lists for all ages through our Pinterest accounts. Links to the Pinterest book lists are provided below, along with a suggested title from each list. For Children: Arbor Day (www.pinterest.com/lakeozyouth/arbor-day/) – direct links to picture books, information books, and chapter books about trees for children. The Lost Forest by Phyllis Root and Illustrated by Betsy Bowen A forest, of course, doesn’t need a map to know where to grow. But people need a map to find it. And in 1882 when surveyors set out to map a part of Minnesota, they got confused, or tired and cold (it was November), and somehow mapped a great swath of ancient trees as a lake. For more than seventy-five years, the mistake stayed on the map, and the forest remained safe from logging--no lumber baron expects to find timber in a lake, after all. The Lost Forest tells the story of this lucky error and of the 144 acres of old-growth red and white pine it preserved. (grades k-3) For Adults: Celebrate Nature (www.pinterest.com/lakeozadult/celebrate-nature/) – Direct links to e-books, e-audiobooks, and streaming videos on nature. The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate by Peter Wohlleben Forester and author Peter Wohlleben convincingly makes the case that the forest is a social network. He draws on groundbreaking scientific discoveries to describe how trees are like human families: tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, support them as they grow, share nutrients with those who are sick or struggling, and even warn each other of impending dangers. Wohlleben also shares his deep love of woods and forests, explaining the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in his woodland. After learning about the complex life of trees, a walk in the woods will never be the same again. (Available as an e-book, e-audiobook, and print book.) heritage trees A 55’ tall Japanese zelkova measuring 6’10” in circumference with a 60’ crown spread is the first of its species to be designated a Lake Oswego Heritage Tree. The Parks, Recreation, and Natural Resources Advisory Board voted unanimously to approve the nomination during its March 2021 meeting. The tree is located at 3209 Lake Grove Avenue on private property, but is easy to see from the street near the intersection of Lake Grove Avenue and Upper Drive. A Heritage Tree plaque will be installed soon and the tree will be added to the list of 40 other Heritage Trees that have been designated since 1998. Visit lakeoswego.city/planning/heritage-tree-program to view the Heritage Tree Guide, browse the on-line Story Map, and learn more about how you can nominate a tree for Heritage Tree designation. Information: 503-635-0290 www.lakeoswego.city Creating PartnershiPs and habitat Four years ago, Parks started working on invasive species removal in the easternmost section of Luscher Farm known as the Brock site. In February of 2019, volunteers came together with project partners to plant 110 native Oregon white oaks and 6,000 native shrubs to start a grove as shown on the Luscher Area Master Plan. Since then, the trees and plants have been mulched and a watering system was created to help the oaks establish during our warm summer months. Over the summer of 2019, invasive species removal continued in the fields at Luscher which in turn prepped the next site for a second oak grove planting at the Crowell Property just west of Brock. On February 29th, over 170 volunteers came together with Friends of Trees, Friends of Luscher Farm, and Portland Garden Club to plant an additional 150 Oregon white oaks at Luscher Farm. This planting consisted of 60 one-to-two-inch caliper trees and 90 two-to-three-gallon size trees. Each of the larger trees had to be removed from its pot, metal basket and burlap before being planted at the proper depth, and was loosely staked for support since wind gusts can be high at Luscher. It took just two hours for this incredible group of volunteers to install all these trees with tender loving care. Since then, we have had two planting parties with volunteers including the Portland Garden Club who have added additional natives to the Brock planting that will attract pollinators and provide a variety of habitats for wildlife. Look for pollinator-friendly wildflowers to make their appearance this spring. This Arbor Month, take a walk through the oaks and pollinator habitat at Luscher and dream about how awesome these groves will be for generations to come! 100,000 thanks to the arbor day foUndation Lake Oswego Parks and Recreation was awarded the gift of 100,000 bareroot native trees and shrubs by the Arbor Day Foundation through the 2021 Columbia Basin Tree Planting Partnership Program! The Arbor Day Foundation will have funded over 936,000 native plants that will go into the Willamette Basin and parts of the Columbia River System supporting their long-term watershed conservation and restoration efforts in 2021. This work covers over 700 acres and we are so proud that Lake Oswego is included! The City extends its gratitude to Ash Creek Forest Management, Scholls Valley Native Nursery and Bonneville Environmental Foundation, who support this project and our work in Lake Oswego. Ash Creek Forest Management has planted 16,000 tree seedlings in various natural areas with species such as Oregon white oak, cascara and western crabapple, as well native shrubs such as Pacific ninebark, oceanspray and mock orange, to name a few. Please join us in thanking these great organizations and partners for all their help in restoring and enhancing our parks! remove ivy, be an lo tree hero! Throughout Arbor Month, OLWC is encouraging community members to make a difference by connecting with their local Urban Forest Committee to gain the super powers needed to successfully remove tree ivy in their neighborhood - tools, education and leadership. Being an urban forest superhero is hard work and OLWC wants to recognize the tireless efforts of our community super heroes. Take a photo of trees that you saved from ivy and send them our way by tagging @oswegolakewc on social media (Facebook, Instagram) and using the hastags #LOTreeHero and #UrbanForestSuperhero. OLWC will be posting updates on how many trees the community saved from ivy throughout Arbor Month. Visit www.oswegowatershed.org to connect with your neighborhood Urban Forest Committee and for information on how to safely remove tree ivy. tree inventory training Have you ever wondered how trees within Lake Oswego’s urban forest can help mitigate the effects of climate change, or the measurable benefits of our urban forest? Are you looking for a meaningful community science project that will contribute to our knowledge of the health of Lake Oswego’s urban forest? Oswego Lake Watershed Council (OLWC) has developed a new community science program that will train volunteers on how to measure and collect data on trees growing throughout Lake Oswego to contribute to a dataset that will provide a snapshot of the health and diversity of our urban forest. Data collected by our community will provide arborists, scientists, community members, and city planners with information about the economic and ecological benefits of our urban forest. Lake Oswego’s urban forest is comprised of an abundance of trees, so OLWC is relying on our passionate volunteer community scientists (like you!) to make this project a success. OLWC will be hosting two online training sessions during Arbor Month: • Saturday, April 10, from 10-11:30 a.m. • Wednesday, April 14, from 5:30-7 p.m. Training for this program will occur online (via Zoom) and registration is required in advance. Dates and times are subject to change. Please visit www. oswegowatershed.org for the most up-to-date information on the project and to register for a training session or contact OLWC Watershed Coordinator, Jack Halsey, at jack@oswegowatershed.org for additional information. soil yoUr Undies What happens when you bury a brand-new pair of 100% cotton underwear in your garden under 6-inches of soil, wait 60 days, and then dig them up? Now is your chance to find out! Coinciding with Earth Day and Arbor Month this April, the Oswego Lake Watershed Council (OLWC) is encouraging our community to get their hands dirty and participate in the “Soil Your Undies” challenge! Find out what role healthy soil plays in creating a healthy forest. Learn about the microscopic organisms that break down organic material for food, returning vital nutrients back to the ecosystem. Join the community in a fun experiment that shows how healthy our soil in Lake Oswego is through the Soil Your Undies campaign. • Get to Know Your Dirt (Virtual Zoom) Workshop on Earth Day, April 22, 2021, 5:00 to 6:30 pm • Soil Your Undies Kickoff on Saturday, April 24, 2021. Register to pick up materials from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm at Luscher Farm or Lake Oswego or Lakeridge High Schools. • Share your results on July 7, 2021. Visit www.oswegowatershed.org to register. tree Care & maintenanCe Visit www.lakeowego.city/trees for seasonal tree care and maintenance tips. This webpage is updated quarterly by an ISA Board Certified Master Arborist. Explore the archives to learn about trees and storm damage, what an arborist is and does, soil management, soil mulching, retaining and creating wildlife snags, and so much more!