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May 2021 Historic PreservationMAY 2021NATIONAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION MONTH DEDICATED TO HISTORIC PRESERVATION IN LAKE OSWEGO CELEBRATE NATIONAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION MONTH The hisTorian HISTORIC RESOURCES REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM The City of Lake Oswego is now accepting applications for historic resource rehabilitation grants. Grants of up to $3,000 are available for the restoration, rehabilitation and/or repair of historic buildings that are on the City’s Landmark Designation List. Eligibility Requirements The following standards must be met to be eligible for a grant: • The building must be on the City’s Landmark Designation List or National Register. Please contact Paul Espe in Planning and Building Services at pespe@lakeoswego.city or 503-697- 6577 to determine if your house or building is on the Landmark Designation List (LDL). Structures that are not on the LDL are not eligible. • All work must be performed on the exterior of the structure, and cannot be new construction or an addition. • Projects must meet the Secretary of Interior Standards for Rehabilitation and must be consistent with Lake Oswego Code, Chapter 50.06.009 (Historic Preservation). • Grants are not awarded for materials already purchased or for work that is already in progress or completed. • Grants are not awarded for projects that solely involve repainting or change in paint color. Painting may be a part of the repair and preparation. Grant applications are available in the Planning and Building Services at City Hall Applications must be submitted by 4 p.m. on Friday, May 28. They will be reviewed by the Historic Resources Advisory Board at their meeting on June 9. For more details, please contact Paul Espe, in the Planning and Building Services Department at pespe@ci.oswego.or.us or 503-697-6577, or visit www.lakeoswego.city/planning/historic-resources- preservation-incentive-grant-program. Photo: Trueblood House on Glenmorrie Terrace CELEBRATE PRESERVATION MONTH - MAY 2021 Citizens in Lake Oswego will join thousands of individuals across the country to celebrate National Preservation Month this May with the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. This is a month- long opportunity to showcase the City’s historic places. Preservation month is meant to connect the preservation community and introduce new audiences to the City’s work in preservation of the places that make Lake Oswego special. Here in Lake Oswego, Preservation Month, 2021 will be observed by: • A Historic Preservation Proclamation issued by Mayor Joseph Buck at the City Council meeting on May 4. • Presentation of a Merit Award to Rachel Verdick for her work on the Historic Resource Advisory Board and the Lake Oswego Preservation Society. • A public outreach effort raising awareness of the importance Lake Oswego’s past with the real estate community, building community, historic property owners and other members of the public. Questions can be directed to Paul Espe, Associate Planner and staff representative for the Historic Resources Advisory Board at (503) 697-6577 or pespe@ci.oswego.or.us. Learn more about National Preservation Month at: NATIONAL TRUST FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION www.PreservationNation.org/PreservationMonth OREGON STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/SHPO/Pages/index.aspx LANDMARK HOMEOWNER’S GUIDE WELCOME TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD! HRAB announces the production of the landmark homeowner’s guide to historic properties. The Historic Resources Advisory Board has produced a preservation handbook that provides answers and guidance to questions that owners of historic property often ask when they have purchased their new historic home. It is an excellent resource that provides information on historic designation and what it means to own a City Historic Landmark. The handbook also navigates the City code and answers questions about maintenance, rehabilitation and remodeling of your historic property. A built community represents our collective history, including where we came from, developments in technology, and the evolution of society. Your home is part of this history. Lake Oswego, Oregon, is located eight miles south of Portland, Oregon. It was originally founded as the town of Oswego in 1847. In the early 1860s, the town experienced rapid development when iron was discovered and there was hope that Oswego would become the “Pittsburgh of the West.” In 1862, the Oregon Iron Company was formed and the first charcoal smelter began working. Oregon Iron and Steel, the next owners, began to wind down operations in 1912. OI&S hired Atchison & Allen to market and manage the sale of its real estate ventures, which included acreage in Oswego. In 1923, Atchison & Allen began its work transforming the city by converting land from the William M. Ladd Iron Mine Farm, where prized Jersey cows once grazed, to an eighteen-hole golf course designed by renowned golf course designer Henry Chandler Egan. In 1925, the same year the Lake Oswego Country Club was completed, the first of the Forest Hills plats was platted with the goal of creating the ideal neighborhood: country living with easy city access. Its 1920s motto “Live Where You Play” still resonates with the community, which is a thriving city of approximately 37,000 that boasts some of the best schools and highest real estate values in Oregon. Congratulations! You are the owner, or potential owner of a significant property in Lake Oswego, which is designated in the City’s Landmark Designation List. HRAB hopes that this new handbook helps you learn more about the benefits of living in a historic property, how to preserve it, and who to contact with questions of any kind. Photo: Mulder-Lake House, 1927 “Preservation month is meant to connect the preservation community and introduce new audiences to the City’s work in preserving the places that make Lake Oswego special.” ~ Paul Espe, City of Lake Oswego Associate Planner, HRAB Staff Representative MUSEUMS OSWEGO HERITAGE COUNCIL Built in 1920, and located at 398 Tenth Street, the Oswego Heritage House is the site of historic archives, a small library and museum, and meeting space. The Oswego Heritage Council is committed to the recognition and preservation of local history. Visit www. oswegoheritage.org or call 503-635-6373. LAKE OSWEGO PRESERVATION SOCIETY The Lake Oswego Preservation Society, founded in 2011, is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit corporation. Housed in the City’s last remaining Iron Company Worker’s Cottage at 40 Wilbur Street, its mission is to preserve, protect and advocate for Lake Oswego’s built environment and historic assets. Visit www.lakeoswegopreservationsociety.org. NATIONAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION MONTH, MAY 2021 -- 2 WALKING THE FIRST ADDITION AND DISCOVERING LO’S BEGINNINGS August 17, 2020 by Joan Moore In 1978, When my husband and I were house hunting in Lake Oswego for a home for our family, I fell in love with the First Addition with its many cottage-style houses and its historic feel. At that time, we decided on a bigger house and yard and a view overlooking the lake, but I determined that someday, when it came time to downsize, I wanted to live in the First Addition. So, in 2008 we bought our Someday house: a 1920 arts and crafts bungalow. Much has changed about the First Addition in the past forty years but walking through this unique Lake Oswego neighborhood everyday with my dogs, I have come to appreciate how happy it makes me to indulge my passion for old houses that tell the history of the place I live. Lake Oswego is not a suburb of Portland; it’s a unique city with its own enormously interesting history. Starting as an unincorporated mining town owned by the Oregon Iron and Steel Company, it was re-invented in the early 1920’s into a resort-like community featuring up-scale homes, golfing, horseback riding and water skiing. The marketing slogan was “Live Where You Play” and it still seems to sell. But the First Addition was more “live where you work”. In the wake of the Panic of 1893, the economic crisis that brought about the end of the iron era, many residents left, but those that stayed became the back bone of Lake Oswego’s early days as a city. Historically, my First Addition neighborhood, (originally called New Town), was actually the third population center after Old Town and South Town. Platted by the Iron and Steel Company to make additional housing for the workers of the second furnace, the First Addition was up-river from the original furnace and Old Town. As businesses, churches, and schools grew up, the community built their homes and barns and housed their chickens and horses close by. They began to need mail delivery and a volunteer fire department to protect them—and some control over the biggest social issue of the day: prohibition. Promoting the interests of small businesses over the opposition of the powerful Oregon Iron and Steel company, they managed on the fourth try, to incorporate in 1910 as the town of Oswego. Everyone likes to walk in the First Addition with its level sidewalks and wonderful houses with beautiful gardens. After all, in 2006, “Cottage Living” magazine voted it one of the ten best cottage communities in the country. But with a list of landmark houses in one hand and dog leashes in the other, it’s easy to visualize what it might have been like to live in this neighborhood in the early 1900’s. First of all, it was mostly rural; the Iron and Steel company was left with a lot of vacant lots they were trying to sell for $25. That’s no longer the case, but thanks to the diligent work of early Lake Oswego historians and preservationists, we have some good examples. I think my favorite is the red Johnson Barn at 490 G Avenue across the street from the Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, the last remaining barn in the First Addition. This barn was once part of a farm complex which covered most of the block between 4th and 5th Street. It is believed to have been constructed around 1910. Clifford “Happy” Johnson, the first early postal carrier to procure a delivery wagon, used it as a horse barn. The story goes that the first day the horses saw the bright white wagon, they kicked the $90 vehicle to pieces. Happy re-built it, and the horses got used to it. The Johnson Barn is typical of early 20th century barns usually located in more populated areas. Today, the building continues to reflect many of the character- defining features associated with Vernacular, or functional, style dwellings used in the early development of Lake Oswego. The barn features include board-and-batten siding, small multi-light wood windows, basic forms, and reserved window cases, a gambrel roof design, an overhead sliding door on the sidewall and hinged door to the loft. Families from Happy Johnson’s to the McCurdy’s and the Vose’s have lived and raised families in the property. The Voses were well known in LO’s early history for their impact on education. Another example of the vernacular style – with a few Queen Anne elements – at 791 4th Street, known as the Brown-Vose House (circa 1885), is also on the City’s Landmark Designation list. The current owners – including Molly, the beautiful German Shepherd – are preserving the barn and allow us, as we walk by, to peek into our past a bit. It’s a huge benefit to Lake Oswegans that the early citizens realized the importance of preserving our history for future generations. So, if after you walk, you want to dive into the fun of tracking down information on the First Addition (or other Lake Oswego historic houses) there is a treasure trove of information on the Preservation Society website, at the library, on the City’s web site and in books like Iron, Wood & Water, an illustrated History of Lake Oswego. State Street, 1913. Johnson barn, 1963. Johnson barn at 5th and G Avenue. LOOKING FOR HISTORIC PHOTOS? The Lake Oswego Public Library has a collection of more than 6,000 historic photographs from the late 1800s to today. In addition to digitaized photos, the Library has documents, newspaper indexes and oral history recordings. Check out the collection at www.lopl.org/local-history. If you have historic photos you would like to add to the Library’s collection, please contact Carissa Barrett at cbarrett@lakeoswego.city or 503-534-4237. At its best, preservation engages the past in a conversation with the present over a mutual concern for the future. ~ William Murtagh NATIONAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION MONTH, MAY 2021 -- 3 FAVORITE PLACES: HUNT CLUB April 11, 2020 by Rachel Verdick One of the buildings I love in Lake Oswego is the Oswego Hunt Barn located at 2725 Iron Mountain Boulevard. Built between 1936 and 1938, the Hunt Club is listed on both the National Register of Historic places and is a Lake Oswego Landmark. It is a symbol of the time when Lake Oswego transitioned from a mining town to the town we know today, in which the motto “Live where you play” still aptly applies. The Hunt Club maintains its significance because of its status as “the largest and most intact example of a historic sports facility of its type in the Portland metropolitan area” (Oregon Inventory of Historic Properties, Historic Resources Survey Form 12/2002). In addition, it represents one of the few polo clubs in the western United States. The indoor riding arena measures 240 feet by 106 feet and is constructed with bowstring arch trusses which create its beautiful barrel roof, one of my favorite features of the building. 1936 Lake Oswego Hunt Club Exterior of the Lake Oswego Hunt Club The bowstring arch trusses inside the Hunt facility. Still being enjoyed today. TAKE A HIKE HAZELIA AGRI-CULTURAL HERITAGE TRAIL Dedicated in 2017, the Hazelia Agri-Cultural Heritage Trail is a self-guided walking trail linking ten sites to Hazelia’s historical and agricultural past. The trail consists of ten interpretive panels and commemorates the unique historic, agricultural, and cultural beginnings of the Hazelia area. The ten-panel trail lies within the Stafford Hamlet north of the Tualatin River and begins at Luscher Farm. This area is a mosaic of historic, cultural, geographic and rural scenic landscapes that is unique to the Willamette Valley. For more information including a map, visit www.lakeoswego.city/ parksrec/hazelia-agri-cultural-heritage-trail-luscher. OSWEGO IRON HERITAGE TRAIL The Oswego Iron Heritage Trail is a self-guided walking tour to seven sites where you get a glimpse of mining and iron making in Oswego in the 1800s. The trail features colorful interpretive signs at each site. Along this trail you will learn about the first iron blast furnace on the Pacific Coast, the pipe foundry, the narrow gauge railroad that transported ore from the Prosser mines (no longer accessible),the Worker’s Cottage, the Oswego Pioneer Cemetery, an old charcoal pit that once produced fuel for the furnace, and much more. For more information including a map, visit www.lakeoswego.city/ parksrec/oswego-iron-heritage-trail. NATIONAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION MONTH, MAY 2021 -- 4 CITY OF LAKE OSWEGO 380 A Avenue Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.lakeoswego.city 503-635-0257 Paul Espe, LO Associate Planner, HRAB Joan Moore, Lake Oswego Preservation Society Rachel Verdick, HRAB This Publication is Brought to you by the City of Lake Oswego’s Historic Resources Advisory Board SPECIAL THANKS TO: HISTORIC PRESERVATION MERIT AWARD PRESENTED TO RACHEL VERDICK On May 4, 2021 the Historic Preservation Merit Award will be presented to City Councilor, Rachel Verdick. Councilor Verdick has contributed to the community’s historic preservation program through her participation with the Historic Resource Advisory Board, the Lake Oswego Preservation Society and many other community groups. Rachel Verdick is a building designer, local business owner and community volunteer. She is a native Oregonian, growing up in Southwest Portland and moved to Lake Oswego with her husband, Jonathan Puskas, in 2000. Councilor Verdick earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from Saint Mary’s College (Notre Dame, IN), a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Notre Dame, a Master’s in Design Studies from Boston Architectural College, and an Associate degree in Architectural Design from Portland Community College. As an active volunteer, Rachel has served on the Historic Resources Advisory Board, the Board of the Chamber of Commerce, the Board of the Lake Oswego Veterans Memorial, the Gallery Without Walls Committee, and on her neighborhood association board. Prior to being elected to the City Council, she served as the president of the Lake Oswego Preservation Society. Rachel was instrumental in making historic design review and resource designation process more approachable by spending countless hours with staff updating the historic preservation code to be consistent with model code guidelines provided by the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). Her efforts in revising the code helped Lake Oswego become consistent with National guidelines while making the code more user-friendly and easier for landmark owners to understand. She also applied her time and expertise revising the survey documentation of all of the properties that are now on the Landmark Designation List. HISTORIC PRESERVATION RESOURCES LOCAL City of Lake Oswego Planning Department: The Planning and Building Services Department oversees a variety of municipal functions that directly affect the day- to-day quality of life of Lake Oswego residents, including planning, building, permitting, code enforcement, historic preservation and neighborhood grants. More information: www.lakeoswego.city/planning. Landmark Designation List (LDL): City of Lake Oswego’s official list of buildings, structures, sites and objects deemed worthy of preservation based on their historical significance, architecture or history, that contribute to the City’s historic context. More information: www.lakeoswego.city/planning/ landmark-designation-list Historic Resources Advisory Board (HRAB): Lake Oswego’s citizen advisory board appointed by the City Council. It meets to promote and foster the historic, educational, architectural, cultural, economic and general welfare of the public through the identification, preservation, restoration and protection of those building, structures, sites and objects of historic and cultural interest within the City. More information: www.lakeoswego.city/boc_hrab Lake Oswego Preservation Society (LOPS): A privately funded, nonprofit organization whose mission is to preserve, protect and advocate for Lake Oswego’s built environment and historic assets. More information: lakeoswegopreservationsociety.org Oswego Heritage Council (OHC): A privately funded, nonprofit organization whose mission is to promote the history and culture of Lake Oswego. More information: www. oswegoheritage.org Restore Oregon: Founded as the Historic Preservation League of Oregon in 1977, the nonprofit was later renamed Restore Oregon as the group’s focus moved toward preserving the places that make Oregon, OREGON: historic homes and neighborhoods, bridges and barns, churches and Main Streets. More information: restoreoregon.org STATE Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO): Created by the United States federal government in 1967 under Section 101 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), SHPO was established to manage and administer programs for the protection of the state's historic and cultural resources and operates under the auspices of Oregon Parks and Recreation. More information: www.oregon.gov/oprd/ HCD/SHPO/Pages/index.aspx NATIONAL National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP): a privately funded, nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C., that works to save America’s historic places. Its mission is to protect significant places representing our diverse cultural experience by taking direct action and inspiring broad public support. More information: savingplaces.org National Park Service: one of the leading agencies the United States for the preservation of history and culture. In addition to preserving important historic sites within national park boundaries, the National Park Service works beyond those boundaries to ensure that everyone’s history is saved. More information: www.nps.gov/index.htm National Register of Historic Places (NRHP): Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America’s historic and archeological resources. More information: www.nps.gov/subjects/nationalregister/what-is- the-national-register.htm DEMOLITIONS TAX TO GO TOWARD PARKS In December 2019, the City Council adopted Ordinance 2831, requiring a $15,000 tax on home demolitions with revenue dedicated to parks maintenance. Homebuilders receive a $5,000 discount for using a certified home deconstruction contractor and salvaging building materials. In addition to supporting parks, the tax is intended to encourage remodels of existing homes over tear-downs. Last year, the city adopted financial incentives to encourage the retention of existing housing. These measures include fee waivers and a streamlined permit process for construction of accessory dwellings. The city has adopted similar fee waivers for development of multifamily affordable housing. In 2016, the city begin requiring a 14-day waiting period for all residential demolitions, with notice of the demolition mailed to adjacent property owners and posted on the site. Builders are also required to provide certification and abatement of asbestos and lead-based paint as part of the demolition process, in compliance with State Department of Environmental Quality requirements. Alteration or removal of a city historic landmark requires land use approval by the Historic Resources Advisory Board. Additionally, the city will begin requiring non landmark houses that are greater than 45 years old to be photographed before the home is removed. For more information, call the Building Department at 503-635-0390. We shape our buildings; thereafter, our buildings shape us. ~ Winston Churchill Photo: Council Rachel Verdick Photo: Muro Deconstruction in First Addition, 2010