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Agenda Item - 2021-10-05 - Number 15.2 - Approval of LORA Meeting Minutes 15.2 D-.j'p` 4� REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY REPORT r 42, dRLdd� Subject: Approval of Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency Board Meeting Minutes Meeting Date: October 5, 2021 Staff Member: Kari Linder, Recording Secretary Department: City Manager's Office Action Required Advisory Board/Commission Recommendation ❑X Motion ❑ Approval ❑ Public Hearing ❑ Denial ❑ Ordinance ❑ None Forwarded ❑ Resolution ❑X Not Applicable ❑ Information Only Comments: ❑ Council Direction ❑X Consent Agenda Staff Recommendation: Approve minutes as written Recommended Language for Motion: Move to approve minutes as written Project/ Issue Relates To: ❑Council Goals/Priorities EAdopted Master Plan(s) ❑S Not Applicable ATTACHMENTS 1. April 20, 2021, Draft LORA Meeting Minutes 2. June 1, 2021, Draft LORA Meeting Minutes 3. August 3, 2021, Draft LORA Meeting Minutes 503.635.0215 380 A Avenue PO BOX 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us ATTACHMENT 1 �� d`� LAKE OSWEGO REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY � � MEETING MINUTES \L') ° APRIL 20, 2021 12. CALL TO ORDER Chair Buck called the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency (LORA) meeting to order at 5:45 p.m., following the first portion of the regular City Council meeting on April 20, 2021. The meeting was held virtually. Present: Chair Buck and Board Members Mboup, Manz, Nguyen, Wendland, Verdick, and Rapf Staff Present: Martha Bennett, Executive Director; Evan Boone, LORA Counsel; Sid Sin, Redevelopment Manager; Kari Linder, Recording Secretary Others Present: Sarah Zahn, Urban Development + Partners (UDP); Mick O'Connell, MJOC, LLC; Scott Barton-Smith, Chris Hodney, and Corey Martin, Hacker Architects 13. BOARD BUSINESS 13.1 North Anchor Project Conceptual Design Endorsement Mr. Sin noted that Mr. O'Connell, the Board's real estate consultant, was present and then introduced Ms. Zahn. As discussed in the Redevelopment Agency Report (North Anchor Conceptual Design Endorsement), the LORA Board would be asked to endorse the preliminary conceptual design (Attachment 1 to the report) for the two North Anchor Project components, following the design team's presentation.This would confirm that the design was moving generally in the right direction. Later in the summer, the Board would have the opportunity to approve the final conceptual design that would be provided with the disposition and development agreement. He clarified that endorsement in no way constituted a review or approval of compliance with the development standards of the zoning code. Subject to endorsement at this time, the land use application was scheduled to be submitted in May, initiating the formal process for land use approval, including a public hearing conducted by the Development Review Commission (DRC), likely in the fall. Taken together, staff believes that the proposed conceptual design and the architectural design in general embodies the vision for the downtown area; it is consistent with both the East End Redevelopment Plan and the Urban Design Plan. Accordingly, at this time staff's recommendation was that the Board endorse the proposal. Redevelopment Agency Special Meeting Minutes Page 1 of 5 April 20, 2021 As advised at the prior Board meeting, at this meeting the design team from Hacker Architects would outline the concept for the hotel component in more detail, Ms. Zahn explained. Together with the concept for the multifamily component, this would enable the Board to consider endorsement of conceptual design within the desired timeframe for submission of the land use application. Updating recent UDP/Hacker efforts, she noted their frequent meetings with stakeholders, notably City staff and also with the FAN/Forest Hills Neighborhood Association (NA). Mr. Martin, a principal with Hacker, would present information on the project as a whole; Mr. Hodney, design principal for the residential project, and Mr. Barton-Smith, heading up the hotel design, would also be presenting. Mr. Martin reiterated Ms. Zahn's appreciation for the responsiveness of City staff. The City's desired connection to nature and community is reflected in the vibrant downtown core, hence the team has focused heavily on the ground floor of both the multifamily and hotel buildings. Their other priority has been to seek a way to align, evolve, and celebrate the ideas of Lake Oswego styles and character. His colleagues would provide background on their efforts to design buildings that are both compatible with what has been done so far, while also adding new dynamics to the downtown. In seeking to define the Lake Oswego character, he outlined the team's efforts to identify key values, as illustrated in a slide presentation (Presentation - North Anchor Design Endorsement). The connection to recreation and to nature is apparent; the roles of the timber and iron industries and the water that is central to the community's history is clear. These elements, therefore, had been integrated by the team into the conceptual design. They also sought to emphasize the transparent ground floors and other features of downtown redevelopment, as illustrated by additional slides, while developing new interpretations that would be both compatible and authentic. The corner treatments and roofscapes, in particular, were seen as fundamental. An updated rendering was first reviewed by Mr. Hodney, showing refinements made to the multifamily project since the prior Board meeting: (1) enhanced scale and details on window openings and (2) additional outdoor seating at the southwest ground-floor corner and ongoing efforts to activate that space despite challenges of the 8% grade. He reported on the team's work to ensure their design meets zoning code requirements, including those specific to the Lake Oswego Style. They were now proposing a design that would be deemed a modern expression of the Oregon Rustic style. Aided by staff, challenges were being addressed by the design team to reconcile the specific Lake Oswego Style requirements with the need for a design that is reflective of the current downtown building program, while also connected to their interpretation of the city's character. Reviewing additional slides, he discussed parallels they had found between Oregon Rustic, e.g., Timberline Lodge, and Lake Oswego's community character. Elements of this style, detailed in LOC 50.11.001, included moderately-pitched and gabled roofs, large stone chimneys, asymmetrical composition, numerous small windows, and use of natural local materials for first-floor foundations. As currently conceived, the building's design calls on several Oregon Rustic elements, e.g., gabled roofs, nature-inspired colors, fiber cement siding complementary to other materials that would be reminiscent of wood siding, functionally-driven windows in a variety of configurations and sizes, and a basalt-inspired masonry base. The team continued to focus on making connections to Lake Oswego's topography, early iron industry, and to the flow of water in the region, he concluded. Mr. Barton-Smith advised the Board that the principal entry to the hotel at the corner of 1st Street and B Avenue remains key to the design shown a month earlier. That corner provides access both to the restaurant on the building's east side and to the hotel lobby on the west, and the covered outdoor area offers space for seasonal seating. From those concepts, the design has continued to evolve. With accompanying slides, he described the team's focus on ensuring adherence to the planning code's intent and also having it make sense for the program of the Redevelopment Agency Special Meeting Minutes Page 2 of 5 April 20, 2021 hotel. They want the building to contribute variety and vibrancy to the streetscape, hence their intentional decision to look different from the multifamily project. This led to consideration of lighter exterior color for the hotel that would draw attention to it as an "extroverted" building. After in- depth study of the same code section addressing Lake Oswego Style, specifically Appendix A.1, they selected the Arts and Crafts style as most consistent with their goals for the hotel. This style also looked to local traditions and nature for inspiration, in the form of natural materials and craftsmanship, as opposed to classical ornament. He next discussed photographs reflecting key elements of the style, including: steeply-pitched asymmetrical roof forms, usually with one roof sweeping closer to the ground; casement windows; use of arches for accent; and stucco, particularly in white. Patterns, often inspired by the work of architects Charles Voysey and Wade Pipes, were found in specific historical examples of residences in the area that the team had studied. He underscored the common features by noting details seen in a Pipes-designed house in Lake Oswego. Their study had led to the design now presented to the Board. Employing the Arts and Crafts architects' inspirations of nature and local traditions, he cited the example of Mt. Hood with regard to the hotel's form and its white stucco and contrasting Willamette Valley basalt material, along with warmth added by references to the historic lumber and iron. These inspirations, they believe, will provide a deeper kind of architecture that pushes the boundaries. Next, he discussed a sequence of images that highlighted aspects of the exterior from various perspectives: (1)A notable change from earlier views is the introduction of arches at the anchoring 1st and B corner. It conveys features of the Arts and Crafts style, notably the asymmetry. (2) Also new is a number of balconies incorporated as subtractions to the form, also consistent with the style. In a concluding series of slides, details of the team's interpretation of Arts and Crafts style elements in this building were provided: nature-inspired form and material, asymmetry, casement windows, prominent chimney for fireplace in the lobby. The white stucco from ground to roof was intentional, but as this was not in accord with applicable Downtown Redevelopment Design District requirements, they would be requesting a variance. Detail of the arches marking the entry corner were described; these and other openings were a high priority and continued to be explored by the team. The design also reflected a voluntary 10-foot setback from the north property line. This would preserve a view corridor for residents of the 555 condominium complex on the same block and also provide a pedestrian cut-through from the alley to 1st Street. The change was responsive to neighbors,while also enhancing the building's"fit" in the neighborhood. Further accentuating the 1st and B corner was the placement of hotel rooms with windows on all four sides and also balconies placed to erode the form advantageously. Fifth-floor luxury rooms were proposed, providing views eastward to Mt. Hood; to accomplish this, a variance would be requested to add the fifth floor. A particularly exciting feature, he concluded, was a lightwell extending all through the building, from the ground-floor lobby to the rooftop. In total, the team believes their vision offers complementary yet vibrantly-different buildings for the North Anchor. Board Member Manz expressed appreciation for the creativity leading to a unique hotel design and for drawing in local and natural elements. Noting the earlier reference to it as an "extroverted" building, she asked about the kind of material that would frame the windows and provide contrast. Mr. Barton-Smith indicated that this was being explored; at the current schematic phase, it was specified as a clad wood window, i.e., a window made of wood, but clad on the exterior with a more durable material. They would begin to explore color options for the cladding, suggesting that inspiration might be found in the local association with the iron and lumber industries. Member Wendland echoed Member Manz's comments about uniqueness of the hotel design, also noting his appreciation for the basalt-look stone work that linked it to the multifamily building. While liking the archways as presented, he indicated that additional refinements by the team Redevelopment Agency Special Meeting Minutes Page 3 of 5 April 20, 2021 would be welcome. He asked if the extensive amount of foliage shown on the images was considered essential to the design or if the building would be regarded as acceptable without it. Hacker, on the whole, regards connection to the landscape as key, Mr. Barton-Smith advised. As they worked with their landscape architect, adjustments to the landscaping on the different sides of the building would likely need to be made, so the amount of foliage might vary from the current. images. He expressed confidence that the building form and ideas are strong enough to stand on their own, especially in the first couple of years as the landscape starts to mature. Member Wendland inquired about the potential delay that might be involved with the fifth-floor variance request in terms of public response, assuming the conceptual design was endorsed by the Board at this time. Their endorsement of the conceptual design was preliminary, Mr. Sin reminded the Board, but the eventual design submission would be subject to the public-review process through the DRC. The design team has worked closely with City staff on this and other variances; while the outcome is an unknown, the Hacker team has looked at this variance in the context of code and believes they have a substantial argument to support it. Ms. Zahn also had sought input through the NA and abutting property owners. The variance related to the fifth floor, he opined, offered some uniqueness to the building with somewhat low impact in that it would not be seen from either B Avenue or 1st Street. Ms.Zahn emphasized that the variance request would be for an additional story, but would not be for additional height. Therefore, the design would stay within the height limit prescribed in the zoning code. The partners would enter into the land use process knowing that some calculated risk was associated with a variance. Member Wendland indicated support for suitability of the design; a fifth floor was not apparent to him from the outside. Member Verdick expressed thanks for the thoughtfulness of the hotel design. As something unique and meaningful to the city, it would contribute to the unique downtown being created. She conveyed approval of the team's "tweaking" of the arches, as well as the allowance for a pedestrian walkway on the north side; the latter was beneficial to the neighborhood and also supported the desire for a walkable community. On the street level, where some storefronts had been pulled back and greenery added, the softening effect made the building more approachable. She commended the choice of architects Pipes and Voysey as sources of design inspiration. Member Nguyen thanked the team for the informative presentation. Regarding the stucco proposed for the hotel and recalling past difficulties with durability and maintenance of the City Hall exterior, he asked if stucco technology had improved over the years. Mr. Barton-Smith acknowledged that stucco's reputation had suffered in recent years. This was because certain artificial stucco products with lower costs had proven to have much shorter life. These foam-based products were not under consideration for the hotel. Stucco was selected specifically because of its durability, and the team was confident that the proposed product would stand the test of time. Chair Buck echoed other Board members' comments expressing support for the project design. Affirming positive comments he had conveyed to the project team earlier, he highlighted its contribution to the unique downtown. The uniform development standards, he indicated, were being interpreted in a way that allowed for the variety that was desirable to the community and would attract people to downtown. In doing so, the project would be a source of pride at the city's northern gateway and would meet the objective of an anchor in the downtown. Chair Buck moved to endorse the conceptual design plans and drawings. Board Member Rapf seconded the motion. Mr. Boone stated that this endorsement of the conceptual design was not a determination of its compliance with the underlying zoning or zone standards. Redevelopment Agency Special Meeting Minutes Page 4 of 5 April 20, 2021 A roll call vote was held, and the motion passed, with Chair Buck and Board Members Mboup, Manz, Nguyen, Wendland, Verdick, and Rapf voting `aye'. (7-0) Chair Buck reiterated his thanks to Ms. Zahn and the Hacker design team. Member Wendland commended Mr. Sin for the positive remarks about City staff heard from UDP and Hacker. 13.2 Approval of LORA Meeting Minutes February, 18, 2021, LORA Meeting Minutes March 2, 2021, LORA Meeting Minutes Board Member Wendland moved to approve the LORA minutes as written. Board Member Manz seconded the motion. A roll call vote was held, and the motion passed, with Chair Buck and Board Members Mboup, Manz, Nguyen, Wendland, Verdick, and Rapf voting `aye'. (7-0) 14. ADJOURNMENT Chair Buck adjourned the meeting at 6:40 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Kari Linder, Recording Secretary Approved by the LORA Board on Joseph M. Buck, Chair Redevelopment Agency Special Meeting Minutes Page 5 of 5 April 20, 2021 ATTACHMENT 2 (VN E a LAKE OSWEGO REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY MEETING MINUTES JUNE 1, 2021 EGO� 11. CALL TO ORDER Chair Buck called the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency (LORA) meeting to order at 7:21 p.m., following the regular City Council meeting on June 1, 2021. The meeting was held virtually. Present: Chair Buck and Board Members Wendland, Verdick, Rapf, Mboup, Manz, and Nguyen Staff Present: Martha Bennett, Executive Director; Evan Boone, LORA Counsel Pro Tem; Sidaro Sin, Redevelopment Manager; Kari Linder, Recording Secretary; Shawn Cross, Treasurer Others Present: Mick O'Connell, MJOC, LLC; David Lintz, DAY CPM; Aaron Braun, Howard S. Wright 12. PUBLIC HEARING 12.1 LORA Resolution 21-03, A Resolution of the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency (Urban Renewal Agency) Adopting the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency Budget for the Biennium Commencing July 1, 2021 (2021-23 Biennium), Making Appropriations, and Certifying the Division of Tax Revenues Pursuant to Section 1 C, Article IX of the Oregon Constitution. Mr. Boone advised that adoption of the Resolution is a policy decision within the LORA Board's discretion. After summarizing the time limits for testimony shown in the agenda, he asked the Board members to declare any financial conflicts of interest. No declarations were heard. Mr. Cross, noting that Board members had participated in all of the Budget Committee meetings, indicated he had no further update; this LORA biennium budget had not been changed, as reflected in the Redevelopment Agency Report (LORA Resolution 21-03 - Adopting the LORA Biennium Budget). Chair Buck called for any testimony on the Resolution. None being heard, he closed the public hearing. Board Member Wendland moved to adopt LORA Resolution 21-03, adopting the budget for the 2021-23 biennium. Board Member Manz seconded the motion. Redevelopment Agency Meeting Minutes Page 1 of 6 June 1, 2021 A roll call vote was held, and the motion passed, with Chair Buck and Board Members Wendland, Verdick, Rapf, Mboup, Manz, and Nguyen voting `aye'. (7-0) 13. BOARD BUSINESS 13.1 LORA Resolution 21-04, A Resolution of the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency Approving an Intergovernmental Agreement with the City of Lake Oswego Relating to Projects Within the East End District. As detailed in the Redevelopment Agency Report (LORA Resolution 21-04- IGA with City of Lake Oswego), Mr. Cross noted that the Resolution relates to the City Council decision in its June 1, 2021, regular meeting to loan LORA $3 million to be repaid from the North Anchor land sale proceeds (City Council Resolution 21-17). Board Member Wendland moved to adopt LORA Resolution 21-04, authorizing LORA to accept a loan from the City of $3 million, to be repaid from the North Anchor land sale proceeds. Board Member Manz seconded the motion. A roll call vote was held, and the motion passed, with Chair Buck and Board Members Wendland, Verdick, Rapf, Mboup, Manz, and Nguyen voting `aye'. (7-0) 13.2 Approval to Increase the City Hall Project Budget Mr. Sin introduced two additional meeting participants with key roles in the City Hall project: Mr. Lintz, representing DAY CPM, owner's representative for LORA, and Mr. Braun, senior project manager with Howard S. Wright, the general contractor. Mr. Braun updated the Board on the project, discussing an accompanying slide presentation (Presentation — City Hall Project Update). Major milestones had been met successfully in the months since his last update in December, including completion of the new city hall building, move-in, and demolition of the former building. He highlighted significant challenges in meeting the project schedule: COVID-19 impacts, the September 2020 regional wildfires and related air- quality issues, and the February 2021 ice storm with a prolonged loss of power to the site. Despite the challenges, he reported the project to be relatively on schedule. Phase 2 structures would be complete in July, and the upcoming major milestone of substantial completion of the overall project is scheduled for early September. He emphasized the team's focus on safety, reporting that 140,000 man-hours had been worked without a recordable injury. As a result of their COVID- 19 protocols, there had been no outbreaks on site. Aerial and other photos of the new building were reviewed, followed by slides showing demolition of the old building; significant planning for the demolition had been required because of the proximity of the two buildings. As to infill, he described the mass excavation and shoring of surrounding walls that had been required. Renderings of the public plaza and parking were displayed, followed by a review of construction activities to be completed within the next few months. Mr. Sin recapped the request for approval of a $500,000 increase to the overall project budget. The original $43 million budget, approved in July 2019, was based on an estimate made at that Redevelopment Agency Meeting Minutes Page 2 of 6 June 1, 2021 time. Staff believes that, given the change orders and other construction-related items in progress, the additional $500,000 would help in achieving substantial completion by early September, as scheduled. As he had reported previously, the funds would be directed to changes related to construction, design, and value-added items initiated by LORA as owner. Included were some consulting costs and a small additional cash reserve for unexpected expenses that might arise before project completion. As discussed in the Redevelopment Agency Report(Increase City Hall Project Budget), the $500,000 would come from the City's capital reserve fund; any unused portion of that amount would remain in that fund. Referring to reasons for the higher Phase 2 project cost cited in the Report (p 2), Member Rapf asked about the specific items that had been omitted from the original estimate. Mr. Sin explained that both phases of construction had to be included in the budget estimate. The Phase 1 estimate had been prepared for work that was going out for bid initially. For Phase 2, the estimate did not include actual bid amounts because that was not feasible so far in advance of the construction start, hence less certainty with costs. Mr. Braun indicated that he did not recall specific items omitted, but discussed important reasons that the Phase 2 bid process had been deferred for two years: (1) Costs for bringing in the large quantity of soil for infill were subject to wide swings in trucking and fuel costs over time; (2) Paving being a major component of this phase,the petroleum content of asphalt was among escalation risks. Rather than carrying a very high budget, the decision had been made to carry a budget including estimated Phase 2 costs based on the construction documents prepared at the 60% point in design development. Member Rapf expressed his lack of enthusiasm for approving additional money for a $43 million city hall project, especially given that it was not a facility for broader community use. He was unlikely to be comfortable deciding on the request without seeing an itemized list showing how every dollar of the $500,000 would be spent. Noting concern about possible "scope creep", he suggested that the money could be used to greater community benefit elsewhere. Acknowledging the desire to complete the project within budget, Member Wendland questioned the feasibility of not approving the increase. Mr. Sin advised that it would be necessary for staff to take a hard look at costs and other effects of items currently being worked on, including those for value-added items; another option might be simply to make cuts across the board. In any event, detailed analysis would be needed to determine whether or not the project could be finished with the remaining budgeted funds. Much of the contingency amount is already earmarked, though not committed. Staff had considered these factors in making their request for the$500,000 increase, he reiterated. The goal was not to spend that full amount; it was simply seen as enough to ensure completion. Any unspent monies in the contractor contingency or in this reserve of $500,000 would be returned to the project. Member Wendland complimented the entire project team for the outstanding outcome of their hard work. He did not want to quibble about the small amount of additional expense, and expressed his support for approving the increase. In his view, the project had been managed very well. Chair Buck noted that the project had been funded mostly with LORA dollars, and to a lesser degree, from the general fund. He asked why the proposed $500,000 increase was to come from the capital reserve fund. Mr. Sin advised that, as the project has accelerated, the anticipated tax increment funding has been spent. City Finance Director Cross had advised the LORA Board earlier in the year that the City could make some funds available from its capital reserve fund, and this was now being tapped for the project. Chair Buck indicated he would support the request for Redevelopment Agency Meeting Minutes Page 3 of 6 June 1, 2021 the budget increase. However, rather than being asked to consider an aggregate dollar amount, he would have preferred receiving a list of the specific items and associated costs to support that total. This was of particular concern at this point late in the project timeline. Lacking the detail on this request, his expectation was that every dollar of the increase would be spent. Member Manz noted that her involvement in the major infrastructure project of the Lake Oswego- Tigard Water Partnership had acquainted her with glitches in large construction projects. In the case of City Hall, the Board would have benefited from having a list of potential threats and their financial impacts as the project moved along; having the information might have resulted in different choices. She stated that the new facility would be a beautiful place in the community center and that she would vote in favor of the increase, though she found herself troubled. Having worked with Mr. Sin on the project for the past two years, Mr. Lintz congratulated the Howard S. Wright team for their commitment to stringent COVID-19 protocols throughout the construction period. As a 40-year veteran of the construction industry, he regards the on-schedule project delivery to be remarkable. Also noteworthy were the various expenditures and operational changes that resulted in zero infections. Notwithstanding Mr. Sin's humility, there was a long list of scope changes that had been addressed since the job began. For this, he commended Mr. Sin and Mr. Braun for their work in bringing the project to its current status with no schedule change. Member Manz thanked Mr. Lintz for making these points and also acknowledged Mr. Sin. Member Mboup expressed great satisfaction with Mr. Sin's work on the project. In his view, the $500,000 was not material in comparison to the total cost of this project and its value to the city. He likened the public plaza and other features to town halls seen in major cities in other parts of the world. He urged his Board colleagues to join him in approving the increase and thanking Mr. Sin, other staff, and the contractor for their part in creating this beautiful community asset. While recognizing and agreeing that the buildings will be beautiful, Member Rapf clarified that his issue was more a desire for transparency for the Board and citizens. He offered the analogy of a restaurant visit, where one receives an itemization of what will be paid for, rather than simply a sum of money. The Board's duty to Lake Oswego was to know where every dime was going, hence he would be voting `no' on the matter. He wants to understand all components of the $500,000 increase and the related rationale; perhaps some of the changes could be foregone or modified to reduce cost. Half a million dollars was not insignificant, considering that much smaller amounts had merited lengthy discussion by the City Council. The Board's duty is to analyze it thoroughly, especially at this late stage of the project, he concluded. Member Nguyen acknowledged the importance of the Board's fiscal responsibility in such projects. However, even in the private sector, he believed it was rare to complete a construction project at or below budget. Additionally, circumstances of this project environment had presented challenges that should be recognized. With the facility already being occupied and completion in sight, it also is necessary to recognize one difference between a government entity and private business: government, with its many unknowns, is inherently less efficient. On the other hand, staff has worked hard to manage risk and related potential high costs, e.g., prevailing-wage issues. At this point, the Board should simply recognize these facts. Redevelopment Agency Meeting Minutes Page 4 of 6 June 1, 2021 Chair Buck expressed the Board's recognition that Mr. Sin and the team had saved money in other areas in the course of the project. Without those savings, the Board would now be considering a different financial picture. Member Mboup moved to approve a budget increase of $500,000 for the City Hall Project for a total project amount of$43,493,242. Member Nguyen seconded the motion. Member Verdick commended Mr. Sin for effective handling of the project, with its difficult challenges. She concurred with Mr. Lintz, hailing the achievement of keeping such a huge project on schedule during the pandemic. As a new Board member, she would have found some specific project data helpful, e.g., where money was being saved or where there might be additional expenditure or cost exposure; high-level, rather than detailed information would suffice. This might be considered as a lesson learned for future projects, she suggested. To Member Rapf's point about communicating with constituents: Having this information would benefit her in speaking about future projects. She reiterated her thanks to staff for delivering an on-time project. A roll call vote was held, and the motion passed, with Chair Buck and Board Members Wendland, Verdick, Mboup, Manz, and Nguyen voting `aye'. Board Member Rapf voted 'no'. (6-1) 13.3 City Hall Project Approval to Increase Guaranteed Maximum Price Mr. Sin, thanking the Board for feedback related to the previous agenda item, noted that it would be applicable also to this item. As discussed in the Redevelopment Agency Report (City Hall Project Increase Guaranteed Maximum Price), this request was to increase the construction guaranteed maximum price (GMP) by$504,000,from approximately$36.4 million to$36.9 million. Since these funds were already budgeted within the $43 million project budget approved in July 2019, there is no increase to that budget. As to supporting detail for the GMP increase, he advised that an itemized list of 124 items would be provided. At this time, he would appreciate and recommend the Board's approval of the revised GMP amount. Board Member Wendland moved to authorize the LORA Executive Director to amend the existing contract with Balfour Beatty Construction, LLC dba Howard S. Wright by$504,007 to establish a new construction Guaranteed Maximum Price of$36,965,146 for the City Hall Project. Board Member Manz seconded the motion. A roll call vote was held, and the motion passed, with Chair Buck and Board Members Wendland, Verdick, Mboup, Manz, and Nguyen voting `aye'. Board Member Rapf voted 'no'. (6-1) 13.4 Approval of LORA Meeting Minutes March 16, 2021, Draft LORA Meeting Minutes April 6, 2021, Draft LORA Meeting Minutes Board Member Manz moved to approve the LORA minutes. Board Member Wendland seconded the motion. Redevelopment Agency Meeting Minutes Page 5 of 6 June 1, 2021 A roll call vote was held, and the motion passed, with Chair Buck and Board Members Wendland, Verdick, Rapf, Mboup, Manz, and Nguyen voting `aye'. (7-0) 14. EXECUTIVE SESSION: Under authority of ORS 192.660 (2)(e) Conduct deliberations with persons designated to negotiate real property transactions and (f) Consider records that are exempt by law from public inspection. Mr. Boone announced that the City Council and the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency would move into Executive Session, respectively. Both Executive Sessions would be under authority of ORS 192.660 (2)(e), as outlined. After reviewing related parameters, he advised that following the Executive Session, the LORA Board would move directly to adjournment rather than returning to public session. The Board met in Executive Session beginning at 8:09 p.m. and ending at 8:58 p.m. 15. ADJOURNMENT Chair Buck adjourned the meeting at 8:58 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Kari Linder, Recording Secretary Approved by the LORA Board on Joseph M. Buck, Chair Redevelopment Agency Meeting Minutes Page 6 of 6 June 1, 2021 ATTACHMENT 3 (VN E a LAKE OSWEGO REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY MEETING MINUTES August 3, 2021 EGO� 13. CALL TO ORDER Chair Buck called the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency (LORA) meeting to order at 4:07 p.m., during recess of the regular City Council meeting, on August 3, 2021, in the City Council Chambers, 380 A Avenue. Present: Chair Buck and Board Members Manz, Nguyen, Wendland, Verdick, and Rapf Excused: Board Member Mboup Staff Present: Martha Bennett, Executive Director; Jason Loos, LORA Counsel; Kari Linder, Recording Secretary 14. BOARD BUSINESS 14.1 LORA Resolution 21-06, A Resolution of the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency (Urban Renewal Agency) Adopting the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency Budget for the Biennium Commencing July 1, 2021 (2021-23 Biennium), Making Appropriations, and Certifying the Division of Tax Revenues Pursuant to Section 1 C, Article IX of the Oregon Constitution. Board Member Wendland moved to adopt LORA Resolution 21-06. Board Member Manz seconded the motion. A voice vote was held, and the motion passed, with Chair Buck and Board Members Manz, Nguyen, Wendland, Verdick, and Rapf voting `aye'. (6-0) 14.2 LORA Resolution 21-05, A Resolution of the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency (LORA) Making Appointments to the LORA Budget Committee. Board Member Wendland moved to adopt LORA Resolution 21-05. Board Member Verdick seconded the motion. A voice vote was held, and the motion passed. with Board Members Manz, Nguyen, Wendland, Verdick, and Rapf voting `aye'. (5-0) Redevelopment Agency Meeting Minutes Page 1 of 2 August 3, 2021 15. ADJOURNMENT Chair Buck adjourned the meeting at 4:08 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Kari Linder, Recording Secretary Approved by the LORA Board on Joseph M. Buck, Chair Redevelopment Agency Meeting Minutes Page 2 of 2 August 3, 2021