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Agenda Item - 2022-05-03 - Number 7.1 - Sustainability and Climate Action Plan Update 7.1 4� D� COUNCIL REPORT �a o ""REDO% Subject:Joint Meeting with the Sustainability Advisory Board Meeting Date: May 3, 2022 Staff Member: Amanda Watson, Sustainability Program Manager Report Date: April 22, 2022 Department: City Manager's Office Action Required Advisory Board/Commission Recommendation ❑ Motion ❑ Approval ❑ Public Hearing ❑ Denial ❑ Ordinance ❑ None Forwarded ❑ Resolution ❑X Not Applicable ❑X Information Only Comments: ❑ Council Direction ❑ Consent Agenda Staff Recommendation: No Council action, informational only Recommended Language for Motion: No Council action, informational only Project/ Issue Relates To: City Council's 2022 goals to combat climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and strengthening the community's resilience to climate impacts; Sustainability and Climate Action Plan. Issue before Council (Highlight Policy Question): ❑X Council Goals/Priorities ❑Adopted Master Plan(s) ❑Not Applicable ISSUE BEFORE COUNCIL At the request of the City Council, the Sustainability Advisory Board (SAB) will be presenting a summary of progress on their 2022 goals and engaging Council in a discussion around climate adaptation and resilience strategies. BACKGROUND SAB advises the City Council in efforts to make City operations more sustainable and in the development of plans and policies to enhance the economic, ecological, and quality-of-life sustainability of the City as a whole. The Board also educates and engages the public in efforts 503.635.0215 380 A Avenue PO BOX 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.lakeosweao.citv Page 2 to make the community of Lake Oswego, including residents, business, and institutions, more sustainable. DISCUSSION The Sustainability Advisory Board will provide an update to City Council on progress on each of the Board's 2022 goals, which include: • Advocate for the sustainable design of the Wastewater Treatment Plant • Improve resiliency and adaptation strategies in the City's Sustainability and Climate Action Plan • Protect and preserve trees and natural resources • Accelerate the transition away from gas-powered landscaping equipment • Advance the adoption of electric vehicles • Host a community-wide Earth Day celebration SAB members will provide a brief overview of their approach and initial recommendations for Council related to each goal. SAB will also engage Council in a discussion of climate adaptation and resilience strategies for Lake Oswego. Improving resiliency and climate adaptation strategies in the City's Sustainability and Climate Action Plan is a shared goal of City Council and SAB for 2022. The objective of this discussion will be for SAB to share their initial recommendations and hear about City Council's priorities, input, and any questions that SAB can help to provide recommendations for. Background on Climate Adaptation and Resilience Climate adaptation refers to the process of adjusting social, economic, and ecological systems in response to current and expected changes in the climate to reduce vulnerability to the impacts of climate change.1 Resilience is the capacity to anticipate, withstand, recover from, and adapt to changing conditions, stresses and disruptions. Increased resilience is an outcome of climate adaptation. The City's Sustainability and Climate Action Plan includes strategies for both climate mitigation—reducing greenhouse gas emissions—and climate adaptation. Adaptation strategies in the plan focus on updating emergency preparedness and response policies for current and anticipated climate impacts, and reducing community vulnerability to wildfire smoke. SAB provided recommendations on additional short- and long-term actions to improve resiliency and climate action to Council at their March 2021 Study Session on Climate Action Planning (see Attachment 1, pages 2—4). ATTACHMENTS 1. SAB Memo from the March 2021 Council Study Session on Climate Action Planning 1 UN Climate Change, "What do adaptation to climate change and climate resilience mean?", httos://unfccc.int/topics/adaptation-and-resilience/the-bia-picture/what-do-adaptation-to-climate-chance-and- climate-resilience-mean 503.635.0215 380 A Avenue PO BOX 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.lakeoswego.city ATTACHMENT 1 MEMORANDUM meowHof TO: Mayor Joe Buck Members of the City Council FROM: Members of the Sustainability Advisory Board (SAB) SUBJECT: March 2021 Council Study Session on Climate Action Planning DATE: March 2, 2021 The Sustainability Advisory Board (SAB) has been asked by the City to share recommendations for prioritizing implementation actions from the City's Sustainability and Climate Action Plan (S/CAP), which was formally adopted by City Council under Resolution 19-54, on May 5, 2020. We are excited to be supporting the Council's work of building a vibrant and resilient city—now and into the future. We look forward to continuing this partnership and are pleased to present our ideas for consideration at the upcoming Council Study Session on Climate Action Planning, scheduled for March 16, at 3:00pm. In preparation for the Council Study Session, the SAB has prepared this memo to outline poten- tial benefits, impacts, and challenges of implementation of the recommended climate actions, both short term and long term. To that end, this memo identifies (1) specific focus areas from the S/CAP for consideration as priority areas of implementation, and (2) key questions to con- sider for each focus area, including: • What action can be accomplished in the near term? • What actions will require a more work and investment, and should be included in near- term planning stages? • What are possible concerns or sensitive topics that may have mixed support, or dispro- portionate impact on members of our community? We have selected our recommended priorities in alignment with the recent goal-setting work completed earlier this year (see SAB 2021 Goals Memo attached), as well as from the challeng- ing experiences of the past year including COVID-19, wildfires, ice storms, power outages and disruptions in water service. 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us Page 2 Our recommended priorities and related considerations include the following: (1) Improve Resiliency and Enhance Climate Adaptation: As we reflect on 2020, and all the challenges that we have endured and overcome as a commu- nity, the SAB feels strongly that we need to strengthen our community and City policies toward the goal of improved resiliency and robust climate adaptation strategies. While we remain in the grips of the coronavirus pandemic, we have already overcome significant obstacles relating to the conditions created by the summer wildfires and winter ice storms. The incredible re- sponse of City staff and community members to come together is inspiring. We want to build on all of the great work and lessons learned from these recent events to strengthen our infra- structure, policies, and response plans to minimize the impact and disruption of catastrophic events in the future. Several priority areas for improving resiliency and climate adaptation include preparing for im- pacts from: • Wildfires • Ice storms • Extreme temperatures • Heavy Rains/ Floods • Earthquakes • Windstorms • Droughts • Airborne pathogens • Impacts from a shifting climate. Short-term Actions: Several actions for the short-term relate to leveraging existing Emergency Response Planning and incorporating climate-related adaptation and resilience. • As there were no Emergency Preparedness fairs this past year due to COVID, consider hosting a virtual session, and including steps to prepare for wildfires, ice storms, and ex- treme temperatures, among other emergency events. • Prepare informational materials to support citizens in preparing for potential disaster scenarios, such as "tightening" residential spaces to deal with extreme temperatures or hazardous air quality. This will also benefit residents in non-emergency times by im- proving energy efficiency. • Encourage and facilitate pre-planning during non-emergency times to identify people who will need extra help in an emergency—climate-related or otherwise. Some Neigh- borhood Associations have begun the process of mapping their neighborhoods, using 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us Page 3 resources like Map Your Neighborhood guidelines.' Additionally, PrepLO (preplo.org) has created teams of Neighborhood Associations to help prepare for disasters. • Identify for the public the communications networks available through the City (e.g. re- verse 911, ClackCo Public Alerts Notification System, etc.). Work to get citizens signed up for these communication networks in advance of emergencies, using multiple chan- nels to reach people with different backgrounds, interests, and needs. Some citizens who are at high risk may not be familiar with using technology, so traditional methods should also be used (e.g. HelloLO, LO Review, LO Monthly Magazine, the LO Parks and Recreation Activity Guide, a sign-up slot on voter ballots, and information placement through school bulletins). • Coordinate with LOSD and City Departments to use schools and public facilities as essen- tial facilities or "safe zones" in a variety of emergency/disaster scenarios, such as cool- ing shelters in the summer, heating centers in the winter, safe air shelter during periods of hazardous air quality, seismically sound shelters in an earthquake, places to charge up devices or access power and Wi-Fi hotspots during extended power outages, etc. These "safe zones" should be equipped with N95 masks for periods of hazardous air, Wi-Fi hotspots in the event of a power outage, and a source of clean water. This would allow for a streamlined, one-stop location for people to seek shelter and/or obtain critical sup- plies. • Create visual aids to community members for emergency situations similar to the way that coastal communities have clear signage for tsunami evacuation routes and safe zones. Examples include: o Posting signage on designated emergency evacuation routes, earthquake/ smoke safe zones, and public Wi-Fi hotspots. o Offering optional signage for homes that currently store evacuation kits for com- munity use. o Offering residents signage, much like we have 'No Solicitation' signs, to desig- nate people with medical needs or to indicate a request for assistance, such as lifting garage doors manually so a mobility-challenged or senior resident can use their car during a power outage. For example, the Map Your Neighborhood bro- chure has a sign that can be placed in windows facing the street that say "Help" or "OK." This action could be implemented through partnering with Neighbor- hood Associations. 1 https://mil.wa.gov/map-vour-neighborhood 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us Page 4 • Begin planning for a changing climate. Examples include adjusting what trees are rec- ommended for planting based on what will survive in current and future weather condi- tions and adjusting design parameters for heating and cooling to account for current and future weather patterns. Long Term Actions: In the longer term, the City should be planning for "hardening" its infrastructure to withstand more frequent and more severe weather events and natural disasters: • Power lines. Evaluate undergrounding power lines and cable/internet services to mini- mize impacts from ice and trees, while remaining resilient to earthquake impacts. Con- sider the total lifetime cost of ownership—beyond just the capital cost to install and the ongoing cost to maintain—to ensure an accounting for likely disaster recovery costs of increasingly frequent extreme weather events. • Large-scale batteries. Provide back-up power for emergency use through large-scale batteries combined with solar arrays. Back-up power will also help with charging EVs during an emergency. • Ventilation. Partition HVAC in building designs to enable improved safety response to airborne pathogens. • Water (both access and availability). Evaluate options for back-up power (e.g. solar panels, storage batteries, etc.) in the event of a full or partial grid failure to power pumps and related critical water systems. In normal times, the unused solar could be sold back into the grid for revenue or shunted to other City facilities to lower PGE costs. Additionally, evaluate options for alternate water supply sources and demand reduction strategies that may enhance the resiliency of water availability. • Build-in redundancies for critical infrastructure. In the recent ice storm, the City acti- vated our emergency water intertie with the City of Tigard at the Waluga Reservoir site, ensuring that our community did not go without water and that our emergency re- sponders had ample storage for responding to fires'. This type of resilient planning should be implemented across all critical infrastructure. 2 https://twitter.com/LakeOswegolnfo/status/1364009621904527360?s=20 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us Page 5 (2) Assess and Articulate the Sustainability Impact of City Policies and Initiatives: Sustainability and climate impacts are becoming increasingly severe and costly. Improving the City's sustainability and resiliency—and reducing our GHG emissions that are contributing to climate change—will contribute positively to the City's fiscal position3 4 and overall quality-of- life for our community. We propose that the City include an assessment of sustainability and climate impacts into its decision-making process, similar to the way that fiscal impact is clearly assessed and articulated as part of policy making processes. A "Sustainability and Climate Impact" assessment could be included alongside the "Fiscal Impact" information provided for every policy proposal and Council report. This would allow decision makers—both in the City and the public—to make fully informed decisions in support of or against proposed policy changes and City actions. A similar approach could be applied to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) impacts. Too often the environmental and social impacts of policies remain externalities that are not ac- counted for in each decision. The impacts are felt by all—and ultimately paid for through in- creased healthcare costs, disaster clean-up costs, increased bond rates, etc.—but the costs are not directly attributed to the actions and policies that created the impacts. Short Term Actions: • Identify areas where the "Sustainability and Climate Impacts" assessment would be pre- sented, such as in voter pamphlets outlining policy options with details on Fiscal Impact and Sustainability and Climate Impacts. Long Term Actions: • Determine the evaluation criteria for assessing the "Sustainability and Climate Impacts." • Require that assessments of"Fiscal Impacts" account for costs beyond traditional capital and operating costs, but also to account for the embedded costs of externalities, such as increased healthcare costs, disaster recovery costs, and credit rating impacts associated with all new policies. 3 City credit ratings may soon account for effectiveness of climate action strategies. (https://www.bloom berg.com/news/articles/2019-10-15/city-bonds-may-be-hit-bv-cl imate-change-moodv-s-can-now-see- how) 4 According to Michael Wertz,a Moody's vice president,"Cities are increasingly adopting plans that detail specific projects de- signed to strengthen infrastructure and minimize economic disruption from natural disasters and long-term climate change. Cities'increasing focus on climate risks is a credit positive,particularly as climate change is forecast to increase the frequency and severity of extreme weather events." (https://www.moodvs.com/research/Moodvs-Largest-US-cities-take-proactive-steps-to-mitigate-credit--PBM 1158519) 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us Page 6 (3) Advance Adoption of Electric Vehicles: As Electric Vehicles (EVs) continue to grow in popularity and as technology continues to im- prove, there will be increasingly more options for EVs in terms of size and functionality. This market shift will enable more types of City vehicles to be replaced with EVs over time. While the market will drive some of the transition away from internal combustion, the SAB would like the City to actively seek to transition all City-owned vehicles to EVs as soon as feasible. Addi- tionally, the City should evaluate and create infrastructure that encourages and supports com- munity members that transition to EVs. Short Term Actions: • Implement a mandatory evaluation of all replacement vehicles, requiring a rationale as to why EVs would not work for the designated purpose before an internal combustion vehicle can be purchased as a replacement.This evaluation would include which EVs were considered and the reasons why they were excluded, as well as an assessment of the total cost of ownership (i.e. including the cost to operate and maintain the vehicle, not just purchase price). • Implement guidance or policy that requires the same EV evaluation by all private con- cerns supplying services to the City. For example, if the LO emergency response assets are converted to EV, then City suppliers, such as AMR ambulances, should be required to convert also. The City's recent landscaping contract renewal requiring all-electric landscaping equipment is an excellent example of how the policy could be structured. • Evaluate options for how the City can best support community transition to EV (e.g. public charging stations, preferred parking, infrastructure investments for EV charging at multi-family housing, etc.). Long Term Actions: • Design and build alternative charging capabilities (Solar, Batteries, Emergency Genera- tors) to act as back-up charging of standard fleet vehicles in the event of power outage. These alternatives would need to be capable of charging the fleet for 1-2 weeks. • Plan for significant resiliency of any critical service EV vehicle that would be needed in natural events like fires, earthquakes, ice storms, ensuring that there is an established recharging system that can operate off-grid for extended periods of time with sufficient capacity to meet peak needs of essential vehicles. For example, provide chargers, with battery storage at all fire stations, police stations, maintenance yards, etc. The last thing any community would tolerate is its emergency responses grinding to a halt because the vehicles cannot be charged. As an intermediate step, consider plug-in hybrids for essen- tial services if that provides greater resiliency. 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us Page 7 • Eventually, implement a moratorium on non-hybrid, internal combustion vehicles for replacement of City fleet vehicles once the market has proved out the technology for each functional vehicle type and sufficient back-up power has been acquired. (4) Residential Sustainability Certification Program This January, the City's Community Sustainability Interns started work on a project called the Residential Sustainability Certification Program. While it is currently in development, the end goal is the creation of a certification program through which residents are encouraged to make their homes more environmentally friendly by meeting certain criteria, like installing low-flow shower heads or conducting an at-home waste audit. The program will function much like Clackamas County's "Leaders in Sustainability" program for businesses. As residents meet more and more of the criteria,they qualify for higher levels of certification. In addition to the changes implemented through the certification track, once certified, resi- dents will have the option of being placed into a "pod" of participants who will meet regularly to discuss their sustainability accomplishments and goals. This will allow more experienced par- ticipants to help less experienced ones, and it will also provide a source of community account- ability for those who are trying to form sustainable habits. Ultimately, the goal of the program is to encourage residents to take the sustainability of their homes into their own hands and give them the resources and support to do so. The program will also provide a blueprint for other cities and communities that want to establish similar programs. Short Term Actions: To support and engage Lake Oswego residents in improving the sustainability and resiliency of their homes, consider creating and offering the following resources broadly in the community: • Informational materials on strategies and incentives for saving resources (e.g. low-flow showerheads, shower timers, moisture meters for lawns/gardens, LED lights, Energy Trust incentives for energy efficient appliances, insulation, smart thermostats etc.). • Specific guidance for landlords and residents of multi-family communities on how they can make sustainable changes to their homes, recognizing that some actions must be implemented by building owners and others can be implemented by the tenants. This guidance could be structured for optional use on the multi-family community's website or in new tenant welcome packages to help generate interest in participation. • Regularly scheduled Community 'Repair Fairs,' as were provided in 2019.5 s https://www.ci.oswego.or.us/librarv/repair-fair 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us Page 8 (5) Monitor and Advocate for State Legislation affecting sustainability and climate-related considerations. As the City continues to monitor and track legislation at the State level, the City, SAB, and citi- zens can advocate for smart, sustainable solutions at the State level. Additionally, by staying ahead of legislation, the City will be well positioned to respond to forthcoming requirements in a proactive and informed manner. For example, two high-visibility policies currently being considered at the State level include: HB 2001: The City is actively evaluating the best ways to incorporate HB2001 into its policies. The SAB wanted to highlight several sustainability related topics associated with HB2001 to inform this planning process. • Tree Protection. As density increases, larger building footprints on smaller lots lead to an increase in tree removal. The trees are such an important part of the character and quality of life of Lake Oswego. The trees provide many ecosystem services as well, in- cluding stormwater management, carbon sequestration, shade in the summer, privacy, air quality, noise mitigation, etc. It is critical that the City includes protections for our incredible tree canopy as part of its response to HB2001. • Walkability. Another potential impact from HB2001 is increased traffic, which can af- fect the walkability of our neighborhoods. As the City continues its efforts to create Safe Routes to Schools and improved connectivity of sidewalks and pathways, it will be im- portant to consider and address impacts from HB2001. • Deconstruction vs. demolition. As HB2001 creates opportunity for greater density, it is likely that older houses will make way for larger multi-family units. When houses are demolished there is a significant amount of still-useful material that is routed to the landfill. Creating incentives to deconstruct older houses (i.e. to take apart and reuse still-useful housing materials), the City can minimize the environmental impact of this trend. Gas Powered Landscape Equipment (GPLE): The SAB would like to applaud the City for its commitment to sustainability through its recent landscaping contract renewal which requires use of all-electric landscaping equipment. This move aligns with the SAB goal of promoting cleaner air quality and will benefit the health of all people, wildlife, and natural resources that would have been exposed to toxic air emissions 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us Page 9 from gas-powered landscaping equipment. This decision also positions the City to be well pre- pared for forthcoming State legislation that will move the state toward electrical landscape equipment. We look forward to working with City Council at the forthcoming Study Session to identify and evaluate climate action planning priorities. Respectfully, Stephanie Glazer, Co-Chair Kathleen Wiens, Co-Chair Buzz Chandler Jay Hamachek Susan Mead Mark Puhlman Matt Schaeffer Paul Soper Benjamin Connor, Youth Kelsey Yutan, Youth Attachments: SAB 2021 Goals Memorandum 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us A. s MEMORANDUM meowHof TO: Mayor Joe Buck Members of the City Council FROM: Members of the Sustainability Advisory Board (SAB) SUBJECT: SAB 2021 Goals DATE: December 16, 2020 The Sustainability Advisory Board's priority for 2021 is targeted implementation. We recognize the incredible efforts on the part of the City and our community to adapt to life during a year with a global pandemic, record-breaking wildfires, and deep economic and social challenges within our community. There has been a necessary shift in priorities to address these immediate needs. We also recognize the importance of focusing our recovery efforts and any new actions and investments on sustainable solutions. It is with this in mind, that we have focused our goals on several key actions that will have significant impact on the well-being of our community. The Sustainability Advisory Board's primary objective is to promote a sustainable economic and ecological quality-of-life in our community. To this end, the Sustainability Advisory Board shall: • Advise and assist the City Council in efforts to make City operations more sustainable. The Sustainability Advisory Board is guided by the Sustainable City Principles embodied in the Sustainability and Climate Action Plan for Lake Oswego. • Promote plans and policies that enhance the sustainability of the City as a whole. • Educate and engage the public in efforts to make the community of Lake Oswego, including residents, businesses, and institutions, more sustainable. For 2021, the SAB will focus our efforts on the following 3 goals and our ongoing advisory and outreach functions. 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us Page 2 2021 SAB Goals: Goal 1: Advance Climate Action Planning: Continue work on the Sustainability and Climate Action Plan by making updates, revisions, and providing annual progress report. • Review Climate Adaptation section with a focus on resilience, particularly goals around wildfire smoke. Assist with the development of preparation strategies and response plans in the event of wildfires. • Provide annual progress report to City Council. • Focus on achieving solar goal, as set in Resolution 16-28, and repeated in SCAP. Goal 2: Promote Cleaner Air: Evaluate options for limiting use of Gas-Powered Landscape Equipment (GPLE) in Lake Oswego. • Prepare for City Council study session to identify and recommend various options for reducing city, commercial, and private use of gas-powered landscape equipment (GPLE). • Develop outreach materials for homeowners on green landscaping. Goal 3: Advocate for Electric Vehicle adoption in Lake Oswego • Continue partnering with the Lake Oswego Sustainability Network (LOSN) and Portland General Electric (PGE) on electric vehicle infrastructure investments at multifamily housing developments. • Assist the City in transitioning the city fleet to electric vehicles by providing informational resources and reporting on purchasing in annual progress report. 2021 Advisory and Outreach Role: Though SAB does not to intend to bring new topics to the City Council in the following areas, we will continue to act in an advisory role for the following projects and areas of community concern. • Provide educational pieces covering topics from the SCAP, including: GPLE, EVs, green landscaping, recycling, deconstruction, and Home Health Kits & Home Energy Efficiency Kits. • Assist SAB Youth members in their roles on the high school green teams and empower the Youth members to act as liaison between SAB and LOSD. • Update and review SAB website to offer more information to residents about energy efficiency programs, climate action updates, and waste reduction. 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us Page 3 • Support Metro initiatives on recycling education and outreach, with a focus on multifamily housing developments. • Continue to review information and policy around green building in Lake Oswego, through reviewing the demolition tax, City building projects, and advocating for the expanded use of high-performance building principles. • Partner with City Boards and Commissions, Homeowners Associations and Neighborhood Associations on sustainability topics, including: green landscaping, demolition and remodeling, and options for improving walkability/bikeability. We look forward to working with City Council in 2021. Respectfully, Stephanie Glazer, Co-Chair Kathleen Wiens, Co-Chair Buzz Chandler Jay Hamachek Susan Mead Mark Puhlman Matt Schaeffer Paul Soper Benjamin Connor, Youth Kelsey Yutan, Youth 503.635.0291 380 A Avenue PO Box 369 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 www.ci.oswego.or.us