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September 2023 PreparednessGuideHelping you prepare for the unexpected September 2023 emerGency information: 503-635-0257 www.lakeoswego.city/EmergencyManagement PreParedness National Preparedness Month September is National Preparedness Month, a time to raise awareness about preparing for disasters and emergencies before they happen. In Oregon, the impacts of a changing climate, coupled with the ever-present threat of a 9.0+ magnitude Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake, emphasize the need for everyone in the state to be prepared. Oregon’s Department of Emergency Management and the City of Lake Oswego urge everyone to take active steps to plan and prepare today to be ready for future emergencies and disasters. This Preparedness Guide will help you think about things you should consider. Being ready means having an emergency plan, staying informed and aware of risks, and knowing how to get information during an emergency. There are many practical low-cost and no-cost actions Oregonians can take today, including: • Sign up or update your contact information for local emergency alerts. • Enable Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) on cell phones. • Make and practice an emergency plan that outlines what to do before, during and after an emergency. Talk with your support network about the plan. • Pack an emergency kit with two weeks’ worth of food, water, supplies and necessities like medications, copies of important documents and phone chargers. You probably already have many necessary items for an emergency kit in your home. Preparing for this length of time (two weeks) may seem daunting. We recommend thinking about LW WKLV ZD\ FRQVLGHU ZKDW ZRXOG \RX QHHG LQ WKH ÀUVW WZR PLQXWHV IROORZLQJ D GLVDVWHU WKH ÀUVW WZR KRXUV ÀUVW WZR GD\V DQG WKHQ WKH ÀUVW WZR ZHHNV 7KLV ZLOO KHOS \RX WR SULRULWL]H KRZ \RX would respond and help you identify what would be important to you and your family until formal response arrives. • Check with neighbors and loved ones before and during severe weather, power outages, or other emergencies. A disaster can happen anywhere at any time. Once it occurs, it may take days or even weeks for responders to reach everyone impacted. For every person that is prepared, that’s one fewer person ÀUVW UHVSRQGHUV QHHG WR DVVLVW VDYLQJ SUHFLRXV WLPH DQG DOORZLQJ WKHP WR SULRULWL]H OLIHWKUHDWHQLQJ situations and vulnerable people. Emergency Preparedness Fair Preparing for Emergencies Everyone's responsibility The City is in the process of updating its Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and its Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan (NHMP). The EOP establishes guidance for the City's actions during response to, and short term recovery from, major emergencies and disasters. The EOP describes the roles and responsibilities of City departments and personnel when an incident occurs. The EOP recognizes the importance of residents being prepared in an emergency. Residents have the responsibility to be aware of hazards, take proactive steps to mitigate the impact of anticipated hazards, and ensure preparations for personal and IDPLO\ VDIHW\ DV ZHOO DV WKH VHOIVXIÀFLHQF\ RI neighborhoods. The EOP update is expected to be complete in late 2023. 7KH 1+03 LGHQWLÀHV WKH YXOQHUDELOLWLHV DQG risks a community is susceptible to from natural hazards and determines actions to reduce those risks. In addition to being a proactive step in reducing risks, having a plan is a condition for receiving certain types of mitigation-related funding from FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The NHMP update is expected to be complete in April 2024. 2QFH ÀQDO ERWK SODQV ZLOO EH DYDLODEOH RQOLQH DW www.lakeoswego.city/citymanager/emergency- management-program. Thursday, September 14 5:30-7:30 p.m., City Hall September is National Preparedness Month. To celebrate, and to learn how to care for yourself DQG \RXU IDPLO\ LQ WKH HYHQW RI DQ HDUWKTXDNH ÁRRG ZLQWHU VWRUP RU RWKHU GLVDVWHU MRLQ XV DW WKH Emergency Preparedness Fair on Thursday, September 14. Stop by this family-friendly fair anytime between 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. to visit approximately 20 informational booths. You will also get to meet one of our K9’s and, for kids, participate in our Fire Safety Obstacle &RXUVH 3OXV JHW DQ XSFORVH ORRN DW YHKLFOHV \RX VHH HYHU\ GD\ LQ WKH FRPPXQLW\  D ÀUH WUXFN SROLFH vehicles, street sweeper and mobile water treatment trailer. The Fair will take place at Lake Oswego City Hall, 380 A Avenue - in the upper parking lot and inside City Hall. For more information, visit www.lakeoswego.city/community/emergency- preparedness-fair-2023. • FRS/GRMS Radio Demo • Water Container & Bag Giveaway • Pet Preparedness • Hands-Only CPR • :LOGÀUH +RPH Assessments • Emergency Supply Kits • Emergency Tool Giveaway • Portable Sanitation • Emergency Food Options • 5HWURÀWWLQJ <RXU +RPH • Sand Bag Demo • Sign up for Public Alerts • And More! Public Alerts Sign up to get Emergency Notifications The City of Lake Oswego uses the ClackCo Public Alerts emergency QRWLÀFDWLRQ VRIWZDUH V\VWHP D V\VWHP WKDW GLVWULEXWHV HPHUJHQF\ PHVVDJHV via telephone, text or email to registered participants at a rate of 1,000 calls per minute. Important messages that could be relayed include notices WR HYDFXDWH RU VKHOWHULQSODFH LQIRUPDWLRQ UHODWLQJ WR ÁRRGLQJ ZDWHU contamination, shelter locations, gas leaks, missing children or elderly people, and other important information. To enroll, click on the QR Code or visit: www.clackamas.us/publicalerts. You can also sign up for PublicAlerts at the Emergency Preparedness Fair on Thursday, September 14. You play a significant role in emergency preparedness and building resilience within your home and community! Install and maintain carbon monoxide (CO) alarms to avoid the risk of CO poisoning. Let’s Talk Power Unplug Electrical Appliances Unplugging your appliances if power is lost will prevent any potential damage from a power surge once power is restored. Do you know you can save hundreds of dollars by unplugging appliances you don’t use frequently? Safety Tips for Using Generators If winter weather causes extended power outages, many PGE customers turn to back-up generators to power appliances and equipment. Generators may be of benefit during an outage, but if used improperly, they may cause tremendous damage, injury and even death. PGE offers these tips: • Never plug a generator into a wall outlet. Doing so may produce a dangerous back-feed of electricity into utility lines. It may also destroy your generator, damage your house wiring, start an electrical fire or electrocute a PGE lineman working outside on your lines. • Instead, plug appliances and other electrical equipment directly into your portable generator using an indoor/ outdoor, three-prong, grounded extension cord. • Set up your generator in a well-ventilated area. Because generators are fueled by gasoline and propane, they generate toxic and potentially deadly exhaust. • If you've invested in a permanently-installed generator to power all or part of your home, you must utilize an approved transfer switch to prevent the danger of electricity back-feeding into utility lines. In order to install this type of generator, you must first receive a permit and undergo a safety inspection by a local electrical inspector prior to operation. Permanently-installed generators must also comply with National Electrical Code requirements as well as local electrical codes. • Prior to operation, thoroughly read the manufacturer's instructions to safely operate your generator. Research has shown that just 25% of older adults who use essential medical equipment requiring electricity have a backup power source for it. Talk to your doctor or medical supply provider about alternate or backup equipment options, such as a manual wheelchair or an oxygen tank that does not require electricity. When you rely on something as much as electricity, it can be unnerving when your power goes out. Any power outage, whether in summer or winter, can be a little easier to get through if you are prepared. Start with the 3 steps below. Stay in the know Our local power utility, Portland General Electric, offers several ways to get updates or report an outage: • Text updates: Log into your PGE account or call their Customer Service team at 503-228-6322 or 800-542-8818 to make sure your contact information is correct so they can send you updates. • Online: Go to www.portlandgeneral.com/outages to view PGE’s outage map. • Download the PGE app: Link available at portlandgeneral.com/app. • Phone: Call 503-464-7777 or 800-544-1795 to report a power outage or downed line. PGE customers can also request a call back when power is restored. Create an outage kit Build a kit that meets your household needs. Include what you’ll need to stay cool (or warm, depending on the weather), fed and hydrated for several days. Below are a few basic items: • Flashlights or headlamps • Battery- or hand-powered radio and fans • Extra batteries • Car charger for your cell phone, laptops and/or tablets • Water, one gallon per person per day, especially if you rely on an electric pump for water • Nonperishable food and a can opener, pots, pans and utensils • Outdoor barbecue, gas grill or camp stove, plus fuel and a lighter or matches Make a plan • Plan ahead to relocate with a friend, family member or to a shelter, especially if you have a medical condition that requires electricity or you work or learn from home • Always keep ice packs in your freezer to keep food cold until you can get ice • Plan for feeding and watering pets or livestock, if well pumps don’t have power • Consider buying a backup generator For more information, visit www.portlandgeneral.com/outages-safety/be-prepared/ prepare-your-home and www.ready.gov/power-outages. Wildfire Outages & Public Safety Power Shutoffs With the increase in wildfires in the Pacific Northwest over the last few years, many power companies, including Portland General Electric, have implemented Public Safety Power Shutoffs (PSPS) when extreme weather conditions threaten their ability to safely operate the electrical grid. A PSPS is when PGE turns off power in a limited, high-risk area to help reduce the risk of wildfire and to help protect people, property and the environment. A PSPS is a last-resort safety measure and is just one of many strategies PGE uses to reduce the risk of wildfire. For more information on PSPS, go to www. portlandgeneral.com/outages-safety/wildfire-outages. FRS and GMRS Radios The Lake Oswego Fire Department has released a city-wide radio communications plan developed with assistance from neighborhood stakeholders that will provide the community with an organized means to communicate via two-way radios either during a disaster or for training purposes. Through the use of Family Radio Service (FRS) and General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) radios, individuals will have the ability to connect with neighbors in the event other modes of communication are not available. The purpose of the plan is to provide previously agreed upon channels based on neighborhoods or regions of the city. If telephones or the internet become inoperable, community members can turn an FRS or GMRS radio on to a designated channel and share information or needs with their neighbors. The goal is to help community members connect with each other to solve problems at the lowest possible level. This plan is not a substitute for 911 nor does it guarantee someone can request assistance. You can learn more about the communication plan, plus watch training videos and check out training guides online at www.lakeoswego.city/fire/emergency- communications. FRS radios are inexpensive and do not require a license or special skills to operate. The typical range for an FRS radio is one to two miles, depending on geography. The LOFD recommends that an FRS radio be part of your 72-hour disaster preparedness kit. General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) radios use the same operating channels as FRS radios plus are allowed a higher output power level on some channels, have the ability to use an external antenna for improved reception/transmissions and can use a repeater to increase the communication range. GMRS radios do require a no- test, fee-based license from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Communication Know before you go... www.TripCheck.com How you would get important emergency information? Know the Risks The beauty of Oregon makes it a great place to live, but our state has its share of disasters. While government agencies and other emergency organizations will do their best, it is your responsibility to be aware of hazards and risks, and to prepare for the critical period immediately following a disaster. By becoming informed and taking actions to protect ourselves and our community, we can reduce losses and recover quickly. The following natural disasters have been identified as risks in Clackamas County: Wildfire. Oregon has experienced devastating wildfires across the state in recent years. It is everyone’s responsibility to help prevent human-caused wildfires. To find out what you can do any time of year, visit www.lakeoswego.city/fire/wildfire- risk-prevention. Earthquake. Did you know that Oregon is one of the most earthquake-prone areas in the continental United States? Earthquakes can strike suddenly without warning and at any time of the year. Lake Oswego could be impacted by local crustal earthquakes as well as a Cascadia Subduction earthquake. Winter Storms. Oregon experiences these every year. As the February 2021 ice storm reminded us, they can range from moderate cold winds and low temperatures to heavy snowfall, freezing rain and icy roads. Fortunately, in most instances, winter storms can be predicted in advance, allowing you time to prepare. Extreme Heat. While Oregon enjoys a fairly moderate climate, at times temperatures can soar. We have seen this first- hand over the last few summers. High temperatures, humidity and hot indoor environments can quickly cause heat-related emergencies. Drought. As of July 2023, nearly 49% of Oregon was experiencing moderate to severe drought conditions, according to the US Drought Monitor. Flood. When heavy or steady rain soaks the ground over several hours or days, floods may occur. Floods are one of the most common hazards in the country. Windstorm. High winds can cause major power outages. Landslide. In hilly areas with humid climates, landslides are among the most problematic natural hazard risk a property owner faces. Living on a landslide is equivalent to living on an active fault or in a floodplain: the land will move or a flood will occur, but it’s not possible to predict when these events will happen. Volcano. The familiar snow-covered peaks of the Cascade Range are part of a 1,300 km (800 mi) chain of volcanoes, which extends from northern California to southern British Columbia. Volcanoes in our area include Mt. Hood, Mt. St. Helens, Three Sisters, Mt. Jefferson and Crater Lake. Know how officials will communicate with you. Counties and cities often have their local alert systems, the state of Oregon will use the Emergency Alert System and Wireless Emergency Alerts. This will come across all forms of media, TV, radio and smart phones. The City of Lake Oswego and Clackamas County use PublicAlerts, as well as Facebook, Twitter, Nextdoor and other traditional communication methods. Stay informed by enabling Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) on your mobile device, signing up for PublicAlerts. Be Informed Pets Big & Small What About my Garbage? Winter weather and hazardous road conditions can sometimes cause disruptions to waste collection. To make sure you receive service alerts, please take a moment to confirm your contact information with Republic Services (our garbage and recycling hauler). Check your account online or call their local customer service line at 503-636-3011. You can also sign up to receive alerts and collection reminders from Clackamas County at www.clackamas.us/recycling/garbage/company.html or check inclement weather updates at www.republicservices.com/service-alerts. Identification Current pet identification is the single most important thing you can do to help ensure that you will be reunited with a lost pet. Having identification and contact information attached to your pet’s collar makes it more likely that you will be reunited with your pet if he or she is lost. However, collar tags can break or become unreadable, and tattooing can become illegible or covered with hair and difficult to find. In order to improve your pet’s chances of returning home if lost, the Humane Society recommends microchipping. When you have your animal microchipped, it is important to register your information with the microchip company and to keep your information updated. The microchip is not effective if the information is incorrect. In addition to microchipping, make sure to have photographs of your pet. Pet Supplies Kit Whether you are away from home for a day or a week, your pet will need essential supplies. Keep items in an accessible place and store them in sturdy, waterproof containers that can be carried easily. The American Red Cross recommends: • Medications and medical records and a first aid kit. • Sturdy leashes, harnesses, and/or carriers to transport pets safely. • Current photos of you with your pets and descriptions of your pets to help others identify them in case you and your pets become separated, and to prove that they are yours once you’re reunited. • Food, potable water, bowls, and can opener. People need at least one gallon of water per person per day. While your pet may not need that much, keep an extra gallon on hand if your pet has been exposed to chemicals or flood waters and needs to be rinsed. • Pet beds and toys, if easily transportable. • Cat litter box, litter, litter scoop, garbage bags to collect all pets’ waste. • Written information about your pets’ feeding schedules, medical conditions, and behavior issues along with the name and number of your veterinarian in case you have to board your pets or place them in foster care. NOAA Weather Radios Extreme weather events are becoming more and more frequent, and relying on your phone for updates won’t work if it is offline or out of battery power. You need a weather radio - a tool that is critical in an emergency and handy as a durable, weather-resistant source of power, light, music, and news during regular outdoor activities. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather radios operate on emergency cranks or battery power. NOAA Weather Radios (NWR) broadcast official Weather Service warnings, watches, forecasts and post-event information for all types of hazards, including natural (such as earthquakes or avalanches), environmental (such as chemical releases or oil spills), and public safety (such as AMBER alerts or 911 Telephone outages). Go to www. weather.gov/nwr for more information. Public Alerts The City uses the ClackCo Public Alerts emergency notification software system to distribute emergency messages via telephone, text or email to registered participants. All residents who are served by the Lake Oswego Fire Department (including those in Multnomah and Washington Counties) will be covered by ClackCo Public Alerts and are urged to sign up receive these emergency notifications. To enroll, click on the QR Code or visit: www.clackamas.us/publicalerts. Emergency Information: 503-635-0257 www.lakeoswego.city/EmergencyManagement Turn Compassion Into Action Enhance Your Skills After a natural disaster, it may take a while for first responders to reach you. Enhance your skills to help save a life and protect property! Learn first aid and CPR. You can get more information about training from the American Red Cross: www.redcross.org/about-us/our-work/training-education. Learn to use a fire extinguisher. Have at least one up-to-date fire extinguisher and let everyone in your household know where it’s kept and how to use it. Know how to safely shut off utilities. This includes natural gas, electricity and water. Consider taking CERT training. LOFD conducts periodic Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training to educate community members about disaster preparedness and provide response skills for the hazards they may experience during a natural disaster. Offered twice a year, this class fills quickly. For more information, visit www.lakeoswego.city/fire/cert. Older Adults and People with Disabilities Disability intersects every demographic group - there are people with disabilities of all ages, races, genders or national origin. And, disabilities can impact a person in a variety of ways, both visible and invisible. For people with disabilities and their families, it is important to consider individual circumstances and needs to effectively prepare for emergencies. This includes medicines, use of medical equipment that requires electricity, use of assistive technologies, transportation, and more. • Create a support network of people who can help you in a disaster. Keep a contact list in a watertight container in your emergency kit or on your electronic devices. • Inform your support network where you keep your emergency supplies. You may want to consider giving a trusted member a key to your home. • Plan ahead for accessible transportation that you may need for evacuation or getting around during or after disaster. • If you are on dialysis or other life-sustaining medical treatment know the location and availability of more than one facility that can help you. • If you use medical equipment in your home that requires electricity, talk to your doctor or health care provider about what you may be able to do to keep it running during a power outage. • About half of all Americans take a prescription medicine every day. An emergency can make it difficult for them to refill their prescription or to find an open pharmacy. Organize and protect your prescriptions, over-the-counter drugs, and vitamins to prepare for an emergency. • Wear medical alert tags or bracelets. • Have medical information readily available for first responders or caretakers. • If you have a communication disability consider carrying printed cards or storing information on your devices to inform first responders and others how to communicate with you. • If you use assistive technologies, plan how you will evacuate with the devices or how you will replace equipment if lost or destroyed. • Plan for children and adults who may have difficulty in unfamiliar or chaotic environments. Consider your service or support animal or pets and plan for food, water and supplies. If you need to evacuate, you’ll need to know whether your shelter allows pets or not, since some shelters only allow service or support animals. • Keep a list of the nearest medical facilities, local hospitals and nearest transportation. Vulnerable Populations Be a Good Neighbor According to the American Red Cross, there are several factors that make older adults more vulnerable after disasters, including, but not limited to: • a greater likelihood to suffer from chronic conditions and the need for associated medications; • a greater reliance on assistive devices such as walkers or glasses, as well as support from care-givers and others; and • an increased likelihood of social isolation. Take time during extreme heat events, winter power outages or other emergencies, to check on neighbors who may require assistance such as elderly people, people with disabilities and those with small children. Be a good neighbor - stop by to see if they need help, check on them before you go to the grocery store, make sure they are cool (or warm, depending on the weather), and that they have something to eat. Become a Red Cross Volunteer Today! Volunteers carry out 90% of the humanitarian work of the Red Cross. Whether helping one displaced family or thousands, providing care and comfort to an ill or injured service member or veteran, or teaching others how to respond in emergencies, it is through the efforts of ordinary people that the Red Cross can do extraordinary things. The Red Cross welcomes volunteers in all of their service areas. However, at this time, there are a few roles that need to be filled most urgently. • Shelter Trainee - In-person shelter support to assist with reception, registration, feeding, dormitory, information collection, and other vital tasks to help those we serve. • Disaster Action Team Trainee - Provide hope to people who have been impacted by a home fire or flood. Work alongside first responders and deliver comfort and supplies to community members. • Donor Ambassador - Be a welcoming face to blood donors, help them check in to their appointment, help them rehydrate, and encourage them to sign up for another blood donation. • Transportation Specialist - Deliver life-saving blood products from collection sites to processing lab and/or to hospital. To find out more about these opportunities, visit www.redcross.org/ volunteer/volunteer-opportunities.html. For specific questions, please email Anushka Pawashe, with the American Red Cross - Cascades Region, at anushka.pawashe2@redcross.org. Tips During a Disaster Here are a few tips on how to check on friends and family: • Facebook has a “safety check” that can be implemented after a disaster. www.facebook.com/about/safetycheck/ • Change your voicemail welcome message. If calls aren’t going through, friends/family will know you’re safe. • For non-emergencies, texting is best. Even if a call can’t get through, a text message has more of a chance to do so since it uses less bandwidth than a phone call. Create a support network of people who can help you in a disaster. Get to know your neighbors. In a disaster, they are your closest source of help.