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PP2040 Needs Assessment_RevisedDraft_021624_reduced SAFE CLEAN SUSTAINABLE CONNECTED THRIVING 1 .- Ne— Thor r R I1 f t 'I L 1, d 4 i 1 A • • r^ T. '6.110'.. f . r __ . ' Alli' .'' ..,,.. ,, • 4 T if if 3- .... . x: 4,, . ,.. , ., . _ . 4- - ii, i 4 ii- ' ' #,. , " ir • 4' IL • . d d 4* A rr. r w�'R. ... f' Piet k °Ai• 44 1111- a 4 I. -� _ _ - aa�- -�- _ _fib r� 'T e ;y Needs f o,v)..os� 4/ Assessment 0RFG„. ..._ LAKE OSWEGO PARKS PLAN 2040 February 2024 Draft Section 1. Introduction and Community Vision Purpose and Overview The City of Lake Oswego is updating its Parks, Recreation, and Natural Areas System Plan (Parks Plan 2040)to define goals and priorities through the year 2040.This document summarizes community needs for Lake Oswego's parks, recreation, and natural areas system based on metrics, data, and analyses; identifies gaps in access to parks, recreation facilities, and activities; and recommends potential opportunities for future investment.The Needs Assessment provides an in-depth assessment of the city's system to determine what is missing and identifies possibilities to create more vibrant parks and recreation experiences for everyone in the community. This document summarizes the work completed in phases 1 and 2 of the five phased planning process. It considers public preferences and priorities, as identified through outreach activities, along with needs identified through the technical analysis for parks, trails, recreation, and programs.This information will guide the development of Lake Oswego's recommendations for the parks and recreation system in the second half of phase 3. What does the Needs Assessment Include? 1. Introduction and Community Vision, introduces the document and key components and articulates the draft vision and goals that will form the basis of the updated plan. 2. Community Engagement Summary, highlights the broad spectrum of community input heard during the first two phases of the project and identifies key themes consistent across outreach events. 3. Recreation Trends, provides a high-level overview of relevant recreation trends in Lake Oswego. 4. Equitable Park and Recreation Access Analysis, evaluates park and recreation access in Lake Oswego by examining which areas of the City can access different park system features and who lives in those areas. 5. Park and Facility Needs, identifies relevant benchmarks for the parks and recreation system and identifies needs and potential trends for different types of recreation facilities. 6. Recreation Activity and Service Needs, identifies needs and potential trends for several aspects of Lake Oswego's recreation programs and activities. 7. Moving Forward, identifies key considerations moving forward and next steps. Appendices,which include Statistically Valid Survey Results, Community-wide Online Survey Results, Community Event Summary, Focus Group Summaries, and Additional Full-Size Maps. 2 �•s� �`� s� Win_ • • "r`1.47 111 0 C. 'ten.. } 11► Adak: rye r __ p f. ry -:) x iS a 4 YOar.'r. yy��� ..✓`� -c-y rt:. - „x.. R •" w_ '�',"°, 6�::�A ._ Community Vision The public engagement process helped identify several common visionary themes for the future.The following visionary elements relate to the qualities people appreciate in the parks and recreation system,the types of facilities and activities participants would like to see expanded, and the big ideas that resonate with the Lake Oswego community. The City of Lake Oswego provides an inclusive park and recreation system that is enjoyed by all neighborhoods, community members, and visitors. Parks, natural areas, recreation facilities, activities, events, and services are integral to the fabric and character of the community and provide memorable and enriching experiences, connections, and contribute to a healthy environment. The interconnected park and recreation system is sustainable and resilient, and supported by collaborative community partnerships. The seven goals on the following page provide system-wide guidance to achieve the community vision. The vision and goals, along with more specific planning objectives build and expand on the guidance in Parks Plan 2025.Two new goals have been added, along with a variety of new and revised objectives to reflect community input, Parks staff experience, changing recreational trends, and other factors.This strategic framework will provide guidance for developing and implementing Parks Plan 2040 to ensure that decisions align with the community's vision and priorities.The strategic framework of goals and objectives provides a foundation for the system wide recommendations, which will be developed in later phases of the planning process based on community member input, advisory committee guidance, and the findings in this needs assessment document. 3 GOALS 1 Access to Essential Services Ensure that all residents have equitable access to essential recreation services. 2 Invest in Parks, Natural Areas, and Recreation Facilities Invest in the renovation of existing parks and facilities and strengthen the health of natural areas to preserve existing assets. Serve All Ages and Abilities Create unique and diverse recreation facilities, programs, and parks that serve people of all ages, abilities, and backgrounds. Stewardship, Maintenance, and Operations 4 Establish, maintain, and operate parks, facilities, and programs to ensure public safety, provide appropriate public access and use, and protect ecological and recreational assets to ensure their continued contribution to the city's high quality of life. 5 A Sustainable and Resilient System Provide resilient and sustainable parks, trails, and natural areas. 6 A Connected System Prioritize trail connections that support active recreation and transportation, connecting key parks and natural areas with city destinations. Community Partnerships and Engagement 7 Collaborate with a full range of community members and stakeholders to enhance and protect the character, function, and natural resources of the parks and recreation system. 4 Essential Services Lake Oswego Parks& Recreation strives to provide equitable access for all community members to some of the most essential park and recreation services.These "essential services" are park and recreation activities or amenities that have been identified as the most important to Lake Oswego community members.Three of the essential services were identified by the previous Parks, Recreation, and Natural Areas System Plan (Parks Plan 2025) in 2012 and still align with the community's priorities today: Exercise and Sports, Play for Children', and Experience Nature. Community feedback gathered during more recent Parks Plan 2040 outreach activities revealed Trail Connectivity as a fourth essential park service that is important to many community members. In particular, trail connections have been identified as a priority to Lake Oswego's aging community as well as teens and youth. In addition,the increased desire for safe, passive, outdoor recreation opportunities following the Covid-19 pandemic supports trail connectivity as a top community priority. PLAY FOR CHILDREN Play happens in many formal and informal settings. In this case, play for children is defined as an activity supported by a space or feature that is designed specifically to encourage playful interactions for children. Examples include developed play areas (slides, swings, platforms and installed toys), nature play areas, and interactive water features. EXPERIENCE NATURE Nature surrounds park users even in the most developed parks in Lake Oswego but the act of experiencing nature focuses on the opportunity to be surrounded by trees, provide water access, come into direct contact with unique habitats or natural features or observe wildlife.This activity can include a wide range of possibilities from bird watching in a grove of trees to exploring a native planting area within a developed park. TRAIL CONNECTIVITY Trails provide people of all ages the opportunity to connect with the outdoors, stay *1%9 active, improve community health, and safely travel from place to place.This activity includes walking, biking, or rolling on paved multi-use paths, as well as soft-surface nature trails. Park and recreation sites that include 0.1 miles of trails or more are considered to provide trail connectivity. • EXERCISE AND SPORTS These include individual, group or team activities that support general health, 41111 individual fitness goals, competition, or teamwork.These activities can be supported by a range of active recreation facilities — from sports fields to sport courts — that help people enhance or maintain their overall physical fitness, health, and wellness. 'While natural areas can support play where policies allow park access, exploration, and interaction (digging, hiding,climbing,splashing in a creek,skipping rocks,walking,or biking off-trail,etc.), most natural areas in Lake Oswego are not designed or managed to support these types of play activities. For purposes of this assessment, only formal play areas are considered as providing this essential service. 5 Section 2. Community Engagement Summary During the first phase of community engagement in 2023, Lake Oswego community members provided valuable insight to shape the future of the parks and recreation system. The planning approach encouraged participation from a broad range of stakeholders, including residents across the city, neighborhoods, and representatives from Boards, Commissions, and diverse interest groups. Community input helped to define values, needs, and aspirations for the parks and recreation system. This input will continue to inform the development of Parks Plan 2040. Outreach and Opportunities Parks Plan 2040 will be built on a robust public engagement process involving a variety of events and activities for all ages. The City and MIG team offered opportunities for lively discussions and interactive outreach to stimulate participant thinking about needs, preferences, and new ideas. Common threads from the community input will form the basis of strategies that set the direction for Parks Plan 2040. Detailed summaries from outreach events and activities are documented separately in the appendices. Similar activities will continue to be conducted during subsequent stages of the planning process. Parks Plan 2040 Engagement Goals • Identify barriers to participation. Cultivate an understanding of existing or potential barriers to the full participation of all community members. • Leverage local networks and existing community engagement efforts. Build on the variety and depth of existing community involvement initiatives within Lake Oswego to engage the public effectively and efficiently in the development of Parks Plan 2040.Tap into existing community-based networks and groups to connect with a wider range of community members. • Ensure an accessible planning process.The community involvement process will be accessible, understandable, and welcoming to all who wish to participate. • Collaborate and inform decision-making. Collect useful and relevant public input that reflects local knowledge and values and informs decision-making related to the Plan update. • Build long-term capacity for civic engagement around park design, development, and programming. Continue to build and reinforce the support network for those engaged through the planning process to stay involved and share not only needs and issues, but also priorities and strategies necessary for a thriving and inclusive park system. • Ensure accountability. Provide summaries, updates, and useful information to report back to the community and decision makers about how their input was used to shape the Plan and make adjustments as needed. 6 Focus Groups To help assess needs and opportunities associated with existing and potential future parks, Engagement Snapshot recreation facilities, and natural areas, members of the Parks Plan 2040 Team conducted small 10 community member group group meetings with a variety of groups who represent specific neighborhoods, interests, and interviews including representatives perspectives.The Team met with 10 groups over from the following topic areas, groups, the course of approximately three months and organizations: between October 2023 and January 2024. The • Luscher Farms Stakeholders Team also met with representatives from the Lake • Friends of Parks Oswego School District to discuss existing operations and potential opportunities for • Pickleball increased coordination. • Natural Resources and Sustainability Pop-Up Events • Recreation and Sports Partners • Accessibility The City hosted a series of fun, informal pop-up events at the Lake Oswego Farmer's Market, Lake • Diversity,Equity,and Inclusion Grove Farmer's Market, neighborhood meetings, • Youth Action Council and other events at different locations across the • Youth Advisory Board Members City. Participants were encouraged to place • Youth Leadership Council stickers on different types of park improvements, programs, or events they would like to see more 1 183 of in Lake Oswego. survey respondents, including 403 for a statistically valid Community Event survey. A citywide event on November 14, 2023, provided an open house, family-friendly forum for 4 presentations and meetings with attendees where they could spend time reviewing advisory committees and boards. and commenting on project information and talking with the Parks Plan 2040 Team. The 1 citywide open house. purpose of the event was to provide an opportunity for Lake Oswego residents to learn more about the Plan update, including the planning process and what has been completed so far, and provide their input to help shape the vision and goals and identify any gaps or opportunities in the system. Statistically Valid Survey From September 26 to October 18, 2023, project team member DHM Research (DHM) conducted a survey of 403 Lake Oswego residents to assess resident priorities for parks and recreation activities. Respondents were contacted randomly from a list of registered voters. Surveyors contacted respondents through a text-to-online process, supplemented by phone calls with a live interviewer. In gathering responses, DHM employed a variety of quality control measures, including questionnaire pre- testing and validation, and established quotas by gender, age, educational attainment, race and ethnicity, and area of the City to ensure that a representative sample of the population was reached. Communitywide Online Survey Following the statistically valid survey, Lake Oswego Parks and Recreation opened the survey to all community members.The city s! shared the online survey link though various communication ` channels to ensure the widest reach. An additional 780 residents N„,,- and community members completed the communitywide online I - . survey. r 0 Community Advisory Committee and Technical • . . ( -, Advisory Board 0 ,� * i The City convened a Community Advisory Committee (CAC) . r►, �� tI composed of community stakeholders and interest group AO AIM' gi ka representatives to help guide the process while the City's existing 4 _. Parks, Recreation, and Natural Resources Advisory Board (PRNRAB) dam serves as the technical advisory board. From the start of the Dream Big'What do you like to do for fun in parks. project,the Parks Plan 2040 Team has presented to the CAC And Th:kd•...�.why y..g.mp..b.Whm.nk..d..m 6m.ed.u'e:.ax PRNRAB at key points in the process. Each presentation included a Hose o dot s,ider on Ming+you want ra do is parka facilitated discussion in response to the materials presented, and -:� ;"A- questions related to what participants like about the parks and -�,1M Ali recreation system, what may be missing, and how they envision the - system evolving over the next 15 years. Swinging and Sliding Playing Sports fyil , 71 d Informational Materials ` The project team developed informational materials to share with Playing in Water Climbing the community including a two-page FAQ and created a webpage J " .a, ;t �:. to share latest project happenings, upcoming meeting information, -t .- ___. and links to surveys and other project materials. PO ,, ... . 4 .. olici", Biking.Skating.Scootering Building and Expiaring EiLalswo BIM 1 a •♦ • 1 , .{ y • Y r�� - Ten I imono..._11=111111111111111111111111111144 x Tail as ItZ ` who g. _ ci -� _r what you think! rr : :: ... a ye : S _� • • 0 • • -. .. - x ••• •T�.,+��Ak 1. ■ • ram■ - _J�^ }_' ,},;4 ` �IF . - • • M ■• •,,•a..�, .a.'aela..i 3� 4- r - :'''': I - '"'7: - ►Z;:r. >-'1:;r. ... ..-4-;jai-•. .. o-. .. 8 Key Themes Based on findings from the statistically valid survey, Lake Oswego residents appreciate the existing parks and recreation system and have high levels of satisfaction with it.They recognize the scale and variety of recreation facilities in Lake Oswego requires ongoing investment and maintenance. Generally, residents are Residents had high or very happy with parks and high levels of satisfaction recreation... with the following park are satisfied with parks features... 86% across the City 90% landscaped areas 83% are satisfied with parks in their neighborhood 87% natural areas 75% are satisfied with 86% paths and trails recreation activities and services 2023 DHM Statistically Valid Survey for Parks Plan 2040 While community members value the park and recreation system, community members also have a variety of different ideas for the future. Key themes identified and described further below emerged through the comprehensive outreach conducted for Parks Plan 2040 to date. 0::9 Trails and Pathways The popularity of and desire for more trials and pathways was echoed in findings across outreach events. Frequent park users "More biking trails around the noted that walking to their favorite parks often felt unsafe due to city and connecting key the lack of pedestrian connectivity. While outreach respondents corridors." noted Iron Mountain and Luscher Farms as popular sites to walk - in, expanding trail connectivity within other parks and between Communitywide online City parks was identified as a priority by many. survey comment 9 Itt Park Improvements While community members expressed their satisfaction with what Lake Oswego has, several improvements were consistently noted during outreach events.They included increasing water access, unique and inclusive play opportunities, and making accessibility improvements (e.g., signage, parking, play equipment, seating, etc.) as well as adding some places to play pickleball. Participants also noted amenities like restrooms, durable and easy to clean picnic tables, and improved lighting for safety. 0 Information Sharing Many residents shared their desire for improved information about parks, natural areas,trails, available programs and events, and accessibility features. Residents noted that the City's website is not always user-friendly, and some community members shared how they would like to see program and event information on social media platforms, or a mobile app. Lake Oswego's youth also noted how they and their peers like going to City events like movies in the park and the Farmer's Market but do not always know about events beforehand. ft. Accessibility During outreach events, many participants noted that Lake Oswego parks, "I'd like parks facilities, and events are not always accessible.Aside from physical with adequate improvements to remove barriers and implement universal design practices, parking for some participants felt that the biggest obstacle is the lack of information ahead disabled to use of time (e.g., information about accessible parking, restrooms, benches along the the facilities. trail, how muddy it is likely to be, etc.). Another obstacle identified by focus Close to picnic groups is signage that gives people with disabilities enough information about tables and seats what they might encounter once they are on the trail or have traveled down it for watching a for some distance (e.g., steep grades, lack of benches or shade, narrow paths). sport." Other desired improvements noted during outreach events included adding accessible parking, play areas, and seating and gathering areas. Participants also -Communitywide noted the importance of reaching community members who spoke languages online survey other than English through and ensuring parks, recreation facilities, and programming was accessible to them. io Z= Athletic Facility Use Sports fields and courts are popular in Lake Oswego. While some participants stated their desire for new fields, others noted their preference for changes in approaches to scheduling and prioritizing community-based organizations over private clubs. Focus groups noted that soccer fields were particularly sought after, and supply is limited. Many participants noted that turf fields and lighting would extend the playability of Lake Oswego's sports fields later into the wet weather season. 0 Healthy Parks and Climate Resilience Many participants in outreach events noted they would like to see increased climate resilience in parks,their infrastructure, "Sustainability and environmental and operations practices. Others noted their desire for protection should be top priorities. increased invasive species management, habitat restoration, Reducing/eliminating chemical use and proactive approaches to pests such as the Emerald Ash in parks and common spaces Borer. Increasing partnerships and grant funding efforts for should be standard practice." natural resource protection projects was identified as - important for several participants. Communitywide online survey Year-Round Recreation Some participants in outreach events brought up their desire for more year-round recreation opportunities.This included turf fields to prevent drainage problems, covered areas to protect recreation activities from the weather, and indoor spaces that provide different programs or things to do during winter. Access to Nature A recurring theme across outreach events was residents' appreciation for the City's natural areas. Some respondents identified that they would like more opportunities to connect with nature and highlighted keeping the natural feel of many areas in the city as a priority. While developing new park features was important, outreach participants also prioritized preserving and enhancing the City's natural areas. Maintenance Community members think it is important to focus on improving and maintaining what already exists within the parks and recreation system. Advisory committees and boards noted the importance of financial sustainability of the park and recreation system over the long term. Section 3. Recreation Trends Recreation trends at the national and local levels provide context for new or emerging activities or experiences, and help us understand how people play, use parks and trails, connect to nature, and relate to one another. Referencing the Oregon Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP), this section outlines national and local trends relevant to the Lake Oswego Park and Recreation System. There are many trends in parks and recreation planning, down to the maintenance and operation of specific facilities. The trends identified on the next two pages reflect those most relevant to Lake Oswego and do not capture any and all design or programming trends. Key Trends Active & Aging Population Addressing a Variety of Youth With a growing population of older adults, Needs there is a heightened demand for Many park agencies are expanding recreational activities and spaces that services and enrichment activities for accommodate uses ranging from physical teenagers, young adults, and parent- exercise to learning and enrichment child groups.They are taking a more classes, healthy living programs, and holistic view of youth development that social services. In some cases, low-impact goes beyond physical exercise, into programs and accessible facilities are intellectual growth, socialization, needed for declining vision, hearing, professional development, and coordination, and mobility. Sometimes leadership skills.The aim is to produce older adult care centers fulfill this need; in early adult outcomes such as economic other cases, individuals turn to their local self-reliance, healthy family and social parks and program providers. This is a relationships, and community diverse age group that cannot be offered contributions.This approach also a one-size-fits-all approach. involves young people in local decision- making, empowering them to shape their future environment in which they may Universal Design & Accessibility Universal design is an approach for creating environments that exceed Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility standards and are inclusive to all levels of ability.This might include people with disabilities in vision, hearing, mobility, and sensory input.This also includes consideration of different users, such as people with strollers, people with walking aids, couples or groups, variations in sensitivity to heat or sun, etc. Recreation systems based on universal design standards encourage access, independence, safety, and comfort for all people.This approach is being integrated into recreation programming, public parks, indoor and outdoor recreation elements, and infrastructure to meet the needs of people of all abilities. 12 Climate Change Resiliency Equity, Diversity, & Inclusion Governments, businesses, and Cities are recognizing the longtime communities are working to reduce the marginalization of certain resident risks and costs associated with climate populations and cultures in how parks and change. Parks and recreation agencies are recreation programs have been designed, well-positioned to be key players in this planned, and structured in the past.They effort by advocating for designs and are making efforts to address these programs that align with their local climate inequities and to intentionally foreground needs. For example, cities are incorporating these populations in discussions of future water-wise, drought-tolerant, and native park systems,to make parks and plants into landscape designs, lessening programs more diverse, welcoming, and harmful biological agents from the use of inclusive. Parks and public spaces must pesticides/herbicides, and co-locating flood reflect the spirit of place, and that water storing facilities within parks. Trail includes the people and cultures within infrastructure—including parkways, bike that place.To this aim, culturally- lanes, walking paths, and other active appropriate and adaptable programming transportation methods—is increasingly —including recreational activities, classes, seen as vital to reducing urban carbon and events—are increasingly being footprints. Further strategies include tree provided by city departments. canopies to decrease urban heat island effects, parks to reduce stormwater flooding, soil amendments (such as compost) to sequester carbon from the atmosphere, and forest management to Parks as an Economic mitigate wildfire destruction. Development Tool Many cities are beginning to reposition their parks and recreation as a driver for economic development, becoming a Trails & Non-Motorized Mobility destination for tourism and large events. Access to trails and pathways within and Rented spaces, event hosting, and tourism between parks continues to be a priority amenities are becoming top for communities across the country and considerations as cities begin to see how Oregon, including in Lake Oswego. Trails they should invest in parks and recreation and pathways offer numerous benefits for to both promote their cities while also the health and well-being of people and seeing financial returns from a major the environment. Creating safe, accessible tourism industry. connections to parks and recreation facilities increases exercise and physical fitness and reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other negative environment impacts associated with vehicle travel. 13 ` 4` SM1 • y - • -. :•If :ice'-... P - r . ,.. - •I, rb • �"= . : mot: •.' . - Section 4. Equitable Park and Recreation Access and Gaps Analysis Lake Oswego can promote an equitable park and recreation system by addressing the quality and quantity of services across the city and focusing on neighborhoods or populations that are traditionally underserved by public services.This section presents results of a geographic-based analysis that examines park access and equity, based on three factors:2 1. Access to Parks and Essential Services 2. Equitable Access Analysis 3. Additional Constraints and Considerations Access to Parks and Essential Services Park proximity has a significant impact on frequency of park use, as well as maximization of the economic, social, and health benefits that parks provide.The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) and the Trust for Public Land (TPL) have championed the national standard for providing parks within a 10-minute walk(or 1/2 mile) of all residents.This distance is the maximum distance most people will walk to a park. In 2018,the TPL, NRPA and Urban Land Institute launched a national campaign to ensure all people have access to a quality park within a 10-minute walk from their home. According to TPL's ParkServe data, nearly one quarter(22%) of Lake Oswego's residents do not have a developed park within a 10-minute walk from their home. To evaluate areas that are currently served and unserved by parks,the consultant team used a digital mapping program (ArcGIS Network AnalystTM)to consider the actual paths of travel to reach pedestrian access points into existing parks. Map 4-1 illustrates areas served within a 10-minute and 5-minute (or 1/4 mile) walk to existing parks, natural areas, and recreation facilities.The analysis methodology factors in physical barriers such as disconnected street networks and Oswego Lake. However, it does not account for topography and additional time, or energy needed to walk uphill. 2 The park access analysis uses regional,county,City, and U.S. Census data to identify areas of Lake Oswego that area currently served and unserved by existing parks, as well as other gaps or service inequities in the system. 14 WHY IS EQUITABLE PARK ACCESS IMPORTANT? Parks promote healthy, connected, & resilient communities. Parks increase physical activity, reducing the risk of chronic diseases, obesity, and cancer. Parks improve mental well-being and productivity by reducing stress, anxiety, and depression. Parks encourage community connectivity by decreasing social isolation and the associated risks of dementia, heart disease, and stroke. Parks reduce crime rates and encourage community safety, trust, and capacity. Parks improve environmental health and climate resilience by providing cleaner air and water, reducing urban heat, and protecting against natural hazards and disasters. Parks promote economic activity, a high quality of life, and place-based tourism. Source: The Health Benefits of Parks and Their Economic impacts (Urban institute) 15 MAP 4- 1 : " k Kerr1 All Parks & Facilities Tigardral , �I_ Area Portland Access • McNary, ---- .('. ,Park' -t_ r f._: %',-- is Hide A Way ;., • "; fli:. '� Pine Cone Park „, .. _. ._,:: Park TrysfaC�rcck Lake Oswego Parks and Recreation ,,.._, Natural •• SOUYhW OOd .__I' ▪ 1-- . _. Arta ��`, I +''!+, , "9 Park Stafford •� ,'?, Regional Park ` L, Woodmont , ., : *U..4 Willa tte I. Community Park s-;;' Natural.Park Grove Park I to .' i4, ver -�: : 1 4..,;, ME Neighborhood Park Westlake .6 •- '�� • ' •• I ;+ •'-- Pocket Park Park Adult b Community'•• 1:••• Natural Area 4 . '. • i Center 'r: ;Tryon -- Cove Park Trail Corridor Indoor Rossman -`, ;j Tennis o oza Parks 1 = Undeveloped Open Space �q Center Springbrook .ouzdyca Kincaid Foothills M:lwuakie fih�) l Curlicue Park: Urban Plaza Corridor i Ftoehr Recreational Facility Plazas Park - I '•� Pennington Iron Mountain �undeleaf ;r i - "-'1 ;: g Par;•' West is. Brown �/ Water Sports Center r;;, . Waluga Park ldf, E0swe o Willamette E 1/2 Mile (10 minute walk) ' a h'��`•,_•,� Waluga • Swim Par River Greenway `. ., Park % ,, • ,; Base Map Features ,.,1. , --,, YGeorge -J 1 a. Rogers•Park it Schools :1310,,,,g0 L,,ke ~~ Hallinan ' I.: . ••1.,rr.!- ;: South Shore, Water Bodies + .,,r „ . . Reservoir w00 • I �,,� .• rCamontSprings ! Glenmorrie`\ Non-City Parks and Open Sapces .•� • Greentree Greenwayenmorr ` Natural Area l_: � •; �' Park Aspen ; City Boundary '•.�� C Park Zeponsi ,��',- Recreation and __ �, Park _ Metro Urban Growth Boundary ss. 1 ) Aquatic Center_ CO ING SOON! ,'s•t°-;' Glenmorrie Trails and Pathways Municipal ` �' ' Park k.-. Lake Oswego School District Boundary __ :• .:L_ Hazelia ' . '• gt; ' y yy Field ._ ; • �i __11/�j ,i Luscher Farm : , • :V Parkland t, -- „ Westridge Rassekh Park T j 4:::`"• n C4 ���111111 Park Cooks ! I Natal -�... ti{y^` 1 Butte(:�� COMING SOON. M I, ' West If Linn 0., mil.•raw` ""``� ^" '•' Bryant Woods . Stevens II Pilkington ,^, Nature Park r r_"-4 —_ _ Meadow • •-1. `A-Park - _ 7 et:: Canal Acres Sunnyslope Tualatin Rivergrove Natural ] ,` Open Space — I River ti I � ,, Run Park El D R f r ..... L • ° eco`lk •' Scurces: City of Lake Oswego and rI O 0 0.25 0.5 1 Miles LAKE OSWEGO Metro RLISDatabase, 2023. PARKS PLAN 2040 Date: January 2024. Essential Service Access Analysis An ideal park system is one in which parks are evenly TOTAL PARKS WITH EACH distributed to provide equitable access for all community ESSENTIAL SERVICE members to the four identified essential services.To assess this distribution, each park and facility was evaluated to EXERCISE AND SPORTS assess its capacity to provide each essential service.' 15 sites Only parks and facilities that are owned and operated by A. PLAY FOR CHILDREN Lake Oswego Parks& Recreation were included in this 22 sites analysis. However, some facilities that are not operated by the City but that are in or near Lake Oswego may help EXPERIENCE NATURE support access to essential services for residents.These 34 sites include public and private schools, homeowner association- owned open spaces, and Tryon Creek State Natural Area. Q TRAIL CONNECTIVITY These partner facilities are discussed in more detail later in this report. �•�*= 30 sites Three of Lake Oswego's existing parks currently provide all four essential services: George Rogers Park, East Waluga Park, and West Waluga Park. In addition, Rassekh Park is currently under development and once completed it will also provide all four essential services. Parks that provide opportunities to experience nature are the most prevalent (34 total sites) and parks that provide active recreation opportunities such as sports fields and sport courts are the least prevalent(15 total sites). Utilizing the Essential Park Service Analysis, Figure 4-1 illustrates the geographic distribution of the four essential park services by parks, recreational facilities, and natural areas throughout Lake Oswego. To demonstrate access to each essential service, Figure 4-1 also illustrates the 10-minute (or 1/2 mile) and 5- minute (or 1/4 mile) service area reach for each essential service, regardless of park classification. Full size versions of the maps shown in Figure 4-1 can be found in Appendix E. Understanding where essential service inequities are located within the system will help inform future investments to target these service gaps. Key findings from the essential service access maps include: • There are greater opportunities for experiencing nature and trail connectivity distributed throughout the City than play for children and exercise and sports. • Access to parks with play for children is fairly well supported throughout Lake Oswego although there are large gaps in the southwestern and northwestern portions of the City. • Parks offering opportunities for sports and recreation are the least well distributed across the City of all four essential services with large gaps in the southwestern and north-central portions of Lake Oswego. Gap Areas The Park Access Analysis revealed that there are 14 areas in Lake Oswego that are not currently served by any parks or facilities within a 10-minute walk.The boundaries of each gap area are defined as the 3 Undeveloped open spaces were excluded from the essential service access analysis as they do not provide public access to any of the four essential services. 17 areas visualized in Figure 4-1 that are not served within a 10-minute walk to any of the four essential services. As shown in Map 4-2,the gap areas vary in size across Lake Oswego and the majority are located on the western side of the city. Gap areas with the highest severity of need include a black hatch.The approach to determining severity of need is discussed further in the next section. Figure 4-1: Essential Service Access Play for Children oil1gi� Service Area `‘ _ Ana,. �.° 1/4 Mile (5 minute walk) 1/2 Mile (10 minute walk) wooamord ," 1 s" I4. hl�oH I ka j Tinlu i i�.i Povem„rers � �_ -r y �� , '9! Exercise and Rh„a Sports Access _ _ Service Area F T —f - — 1/4 Mile (5 minute walk) r 1/2 Mile (10 minute walk) a 1 11400.441jillt 1 , .1.- '' tr.' 4 -/- ,,,,e ,,,„, 1 - ,.,.- ::: ",,? - ty 0.46 , _,...._,,,,,.„ ,. ,,, , .,,,,,,, so rt,,..,.. R7 Tiiilif Vie�R-rr,n rr _ I I 18 Experience ,,..a rezor . .:, Poraand Nature Access Service Area . . F ( ..., - •... .; ... '; Pine Cone 6".gr., ',„, 1/4 Mile (5 minute walk) Ng 1/2 Mlle (10 minute walk) i. ...., .. . , 1 111 ril 1,,4.trukii. ., li.:ol.ortrf rj::: '-' '.':-'-, -rl P::..T • . ;t [ .. 1 ' Luscheir Farm B,,Ct. ,:t..1-1,-,-- ..,,,„7:•=i,,, H.-,- IVesf Lhu-r —...,—,--/ [anal Am : R'Spa'ce . T.1.fa. Rtrerp:org "AO ' : Trail ,. Vort.lanrf Connectivity ..:. . : Access _t— -_._ : Service Area - , ' 1/4 Mile (5 minute walk) . L I qi 1 iiiitspe. . * l:-, "l'l:l" WI 1/2 Mlle (10 minute walk) • . ., ,---- n1). Foljo. 11L1,11ennarri., Plaza 5 Surcleleaf ''ark re' Memel, .1 1116..... . -. G.0.3. . .. w.U. 11 . :,-..•.. fft. tenmerrie I, Poll .,., L_- ';:,-----..--,', -\;-----.1--- , . . , • t,al: :: . dr / i 11-.1 Lnog ,, . Stevens I itkinglon,.7--) ',. .-1 TenilLt, RR orv,rir.r, 4711, . 11141k i 4.Szare c_j i • •._.,i1Nr.14.' --\:— _1 01 . o 3 1 o I I s , , , I Mlles 19 MAP 4-2 : Ti1.aYd Kerr ; Gap Areas g �`„. Natural � . , `Y Area . Portland O MNary r_ as '� mark' --t_: ...... .. 1 11 • =;=-' Hide-A-Way , ` Pine Cone Park i�• 4 =' Park Tryon Creek Lake Oswego Parks and Recreation 1 p '"S r' Natural ti;-: southw ��ooAdAA t , $ •_ Arca •,; Regional Park Park i ' Woodmont Stafford `s, .• C ':.�4 Willa tte MN•: ,1,' Natura4 Park Grove Park i'12'+ ver Community Park A TJ; _l, - •, L. 'a ;��.`,, = Neighborhood Park it Westlake .• 'r • �P" ' Adult ,b � Pocket Park Park 1.----' , •• -f-_-Z Community ,4, ;, ;•; Center ��; L Tryon Natural Area ♦ i IP '-'• • Cove Park IMI Trail Corridor Indoor Rosman -'s \ ,,Tennis Park/ 1 '; = Undeveloped Open Space 2 Center ••brook Oswego Lake Kincaid I• 5 SpriCmuayClub I Foothills Milwualcie --, i' Curlicue r Park: } = Urban Plaza 10 Corridor i yr-il Millenium Roehr IMI Recreational Facility < Plazar� Park Penm on Iron Mountain undeleaf ,1 ;r Ys-'�:i Park / # Plaza �! ._. , Park .� Essential Service Gap Area .. a. 'yam V% 'Charlie to 1�•\ West - S. Brown r:, i Waluga Park ii g Lake Oswego Willarriett�Water Sports Center Gap Area :.h;;.''t i East • ® High Severity of Need Gap Area II .• Waluga Swim ParkRiver Greenway ;S.. ;•• % L.,_i_ei i , Park ".-,1 r 11 °; •,, •",. 6 — George eat.... �. Rogers•P,ark Base Map Features SI.1 ,' ? Oswego Lake "' Pr". >✓•41:- ��:' South Shore ` Woods `� Reservoir Ns. At Schools � % �=',Lamont Springs r Glenmorrie`Y Water Bodies n ♦� Natural Area Greentree , Greenway • ,_--".1 Park Aspen FreeponsI Non-City Parks and Open Spaces az Park Recreation and" Park r____, Aquatic Center.. ;a- • City Boundary �� ING SOON! ' 7 + b GlPamorrie _ Metro Urban Growth Boundary Municipal / 3 _ Golf course j Trails and Pathways ..--...--.1 La_l L rt _ -14 r �,:r- =..,,_�►_�►_•' H lia �� 13 ", ( Lake Oswego School District Boundary �� , FieldI — ,,,,,, • ‘ _ �i JU Luscher Farm 'jam. - . . . , 11 Westridge Rassekh Park Farkkand i Li', . -, `•• — er• Cooks �' 1 NaturalrArea �'r, , Park Butte COMING.SOON! �. G ' J 1��. �r �� _' � 1 `�• i — West Linn a3 I•1�1, I YZ �Y; Mt••� •a_ Bryant Woods _ • Stevens 1 �� . dI 'II Pilkington Nature Park to-.r„� �-"j Meadow I •_i. `�-Park - �,t i -• Canal•Acres y Sunnyslope TualatinRivergrove Natural ,'1 Open Space L .. .1 River ti Run Park l F s v o © 13 O4f GOB at 4#1111H1111111111M1iftillr.. Sources: City of Lake Oswego and rI O 0 0.25 0.5 1 Miles LAKE OSWEGO Metro RLIS Database, 2023. I I I I I I I I PARKS PLAN 2040 Date: January2024. Equitable Access Analysis To better understand how gaps in service impact different populations groups in Lake Oswego, particularly historically underserved populations or those who may experience more significant barriers in accessing facilities,the 14 gap areas identified within the Park Access Analysis were evaluated further to assess how they relate to areas of the city with a higher severity of need based on six equity indicators. Maps 4-3—4-8 show areas of the city, including the 14 gap areas, with greater concentrations of the six equity indicators outlined below.The maps utilize Census block group data from Urban Footprint which uses 2019 American Community Survey information.The block groups shown on these maps are intended to communicate general areas, not specific locations. Unserved gap areas were considered "high severity of need" if high percentages of four or more of the following indicators applied to them: Communities of Color Across the U.S., communities of color have been historically disadvantaged through segregation, discrimination, environmental justice issues, and lack of public investment in facilities like parks and recreation. Youth under 18 Parks provide a range of benefits for youth of all ages including support for social development, access to greenspace, and healthy activity options without needing to drive a car. Populations over 65 Parks provide a range of benefits for populations over 65 including opportunities for social connection to combat social isolation, access to healthy activity options without needing to drive a car or travel long distances, and improvements to overall health and wellbeing. Populations with a Disability Parks provide many benefits for individuals with physical and cognitive disabilities including opportunities for physical activities and social connection, improvements to overall health and wellbeing, and access to nature. Multifamily Housing Areas with a greater concentration of multifamily housing are important to consider as these housing types typically have less access to individual yards or greenspace at their homes. Poverty Areas with a higher percentage of people in poverty and households with lower income often have less public investment historically and may have limited access to free public parks and recreation facilities. Poverty is measured by comparing a household's income to a set poverty threshold, or the minimum amount of income needed to cover basic needs.The poverty threshold for 2019,the date this data was published, was$26,172 for a family of four or$13,011 for an individual. 21 al=1Q .1FtJN S sL ,, MAP 4-3 : •• ; ` SW STERHEWSOM Sr Tigard 1 1 vP : _ Communities of 1 -=: Portland Color SW DARTMOUTH ST I1� ,,� ` z r .,_• ' _ _ ••„; Tryon , _ Percent Population of Color (Non-White), 1 '-- . TIMBERLINE DR a Natural Census Block Groups zv`3 _t--- a Area ,��� F • �x1ia• 0 4°/ ro ==:.I " 'verb 4.01 8% t i` "` " �'• p",.._r•• 8.01-15% "43. 15.01-21% N!1 COUNTRY CLUB RD :-.•.. ._::__1 ," , Al .,�� 21.01-30% © °o�arQ,L. ,; MiTwrtakie A Essential Service Gap Area l2 MEADOWS RD O4 FIR RIDGE RD 10 Gap Area :al I ____ •Y �p SW BONITA RD tr ^ -_.--_mot-: It V VO'' "T a� Base Map Features • 9° ,� Schools �n i� ° 9 ••♦,••T�{ r h P' ;[_? Water Bodies 'I�i ".`�f"`r•- . rl LAKE GROVE AVE " City Parks and Facilities Non-City Parks and Open Spaces y�A 1 1 r; ��(.i I- _ {�'•� V# i_)a.'I go 1[i:'�. `‘,. r---i J 1 I CityBoundar Fe t 0' .1♦ -. LV° O.1 -; 1 1; `°RL _ Metro Urban Growth Boundary y Trails and Pathways 1 I ; '-' f Q•F `-' r AA- "•- I-I Lake Oswego School District Boundary \ ` -_..... .-, - R��i< Y8 • 2 GREENTREE RD a< Li a 1, 3 . r 3 g , 1 j A 14 1 9O 14 SBERGIS RD -� L r /� 13 i"" r r..,••• - ••Is OVERLOOK DR - 'i /' / , ,.... , _17.;7 1 • a,l Z.‘ CNorf.' West Linn as ' • -Y - S•r 1 • CHI LDS RD '. �'q0 L HI LLC TEST DR Tualatin Rivergrove I .. 0, J SW NYBERG ST ' • , r , G _F IP 00 = 1 4/11111°-.01.11111111011111 , EG Sources: Urban Footprint, 2019 ACS w 'I O 0 0.25 0.5 1 Miles 5-Year Estimates, City of Lake LAKE OSWEGO Oswego and Metro RLIS Database, PARKS PLAN 2040 2023. Q Q ys+Q N ;-- 1: sa MAP 4-4 : 1 - -` SW STEPHENSON Sr 6' VP Y Portland Multifamily Housing 0' 4.1.1111 KFRq-- I • -. i O , 5W DARTMO VTH sr I 1 / `^ '" •-, r' 1_1_-: ...1 � '' '?', a::::: t` i Tryon Creek .\,; Percent Multifamily Housing, iik 0,,„„,,,,„,,,,,,,,„ S a -• i-•: - Staff :: e•- _f___ _ . TIJABERLINEDR a Natural J Census Block Groups Area �".' �tceut 2' ' ; 2 •� J•12 i, :. .f' -- •• EL 13.01-33% ` ' Jo- ' 33.01-57% >> o gt COUNTRY CLUB RD t, = 57-100% 2 5 Oswego Mitwuakie Av Y AAy£ ' Essential Service Gap Area G1.9 MEADOWS RD 04 FlR RIDDERD 10 ,, r. Gap Area Im 1 - .: 0/ SW BONITA RD t„ ^ i__._-_ t_`�/t 0Ca° jr 04 it ;yam ;`,• r re �a Base Map Features ?G J g Future Habitat for Humanity Affordable r +,,.� - s Housing Project •_. •::` '.: 'r,. WKE GROVE AVE A. Schools :�.-• - • ` 1/ r s� t=_• :t` ,; 11 Water Bodies ...4�Q •3: ., Qoa 6 , ti "Jt M r' I City Parks and Facilities y0 4' ed. : :14 "-N4�J - 'O'4F8av -. Non-City Parks and Open Spaces F02- 1 ` r ' •♦ - ° Obi 1 `_ ,•' ' " Y� 1-_; F ��I : City Boundary f O� _a Metro Urban Growth Boundary 111111 1 1 �; R.o � � VY GREENTREE RD A� � Trails and Pathways s. � I°° g •+ �� '� [ Lake Oswego School District Boundary 1 �`� z 27 a ! ' # , r .3 a $ L ...��, 19 t J + J rF�•y S BERGIS RD li1-4. 7 O/ 14 J •, -, JEAN RD F'' 13 --. 'n ' aa'• —re j:: OVERLOOK DR 1 _ ,t lJ • I ..1• • f �'b RO$' iii 1 1 1• -♦ t �/ o� • , 11 -. 4 A ' _q - J/J West Linn II3 " 1 1 �.. j �F .. r 1 It: •_ , :;, Sq cif}•_. t �/ �50 • CHILDS RD '• �'q0 ■ 1 HI LLCTQST DR Tualatin Rivergrove ; •. SW NYBERG ST r 1 ' r , 'gyp, U R , f .r y OS &* ? El 13 Q ,,' '' a '"nf Gn�� Sources: Urban Footprint' 2019 ACS r LAKE OSWEGO 4 O 0 0.25 0.5 1 Miles 5-Year Estimates' City of Lake Oswego and Metro RLIS Database' PARKS PLAN 2040 2023. Q Q h� ; MAP 4-5 : I I �+- SW STEpHENSpN SrE' 1 VP Tigard I Population over 65 ' Portland t ! II3 'TFRR pKNy , _. IFS i 4 SFH , 5W DARTMO,JTH sr HO , !' 1 ,.__1_, _1 • _ % © • f.• L 4 •- t.-. h , t Tryon St to tt, Percent of Populationover 65, A, :y iir_ .- , Stan is TIMBERLINE Ry ItJE DR \'Natural Census Block Groups ,h -1---' -- :T Area ,41,... ^s, a ctiu\ 8 _:�� I 2 ,`,, i`• " '`i, tit�x7ia, tte 0 4% .NEL ROSE ST so-c" :i - ........ r�, 2 x7CY I 1 4.01-14% ; .= „, -- : 14.01-20% ?_,. 20.01-35% �1 ' O COUNTRY CLUB RD . . - ;__; • ,,'i L " t 35.01-50% s 1• 2 .. --- t ; Milwualcie K� WAY Essential Service Gap Area oM .DOV,S RD o DR RI DG 70 .. Gap Area j ,,,, SW BONITA RD IM• -- --.-_-mot_!: != -.-•. gtidq - •• T ;T •' -__%"s• ' " Base Map Features c- 49 a • ° � r -"' oq o +' hiSchools c;., -_-.; ak a , 1 ] Water Bodies .r . , 6c: +:?'.r-'` City Parks and Facilities ,• 1 LAKE GROVE AVE ."%.'J Ti sy9 °=' '.., '',,t 6 11 --- Non-City Parks and Open Spaces q .r..�o1Qr .; te°a SOLaty 0, .,r ; , City Boundary 42 F ` 4• + v ; 1 F _ a Metro Urban Growth Boundary L II y. Trails and Pathways I 1 j ••. o . I v1 O �, xy o .A0 I—I Lake Oswego School District Boundary ��.;tcP ' GRE ENTREE RD 45 rF.11 Y. 3 v W ft 8 13 (1)LEAN RD ti - --T S BERGIS RD -+ L + "7'•. OVERLOOK DR _ 1 • " j • '+• I I I ..: �k I j _''1• `---1 'b e0. , I - I ... °- / "�; :i, L, :%+. ter__ ./ 'p • r. i Cr •1 t Epp - �� - . West Linn as ; - O 1...: E,C.._�--. '• .-'f- • I COLDS RD I SgOS '14O L. HI LLCREST DR Tualatin RiiTrgroue i't." 1: I G FSW NYBERG ST 131 Ell , r �aN. ' ' U O �� L Sources: Urban Footprint, 2019 ACS O 0 0.25 0.5 1 Miles LAKE OSWEGO 5-Year Estimates, City of Lake Oswego and Metro RLIS Database, PARKS PLAN 2040 2023. = Q al=1 sa�ov MAP 4-6 : 1 -- SW STEpHENSON Sr A 'Y Portland N Youth under 18 Tigard ! 1 0 inalli 44. r I • O :_. .DARTMOUTH ST _ 1 ..0,' '� ` r I r • ji, I r. rlp, . _, 1 sr, 1 T.�Stae�reek ':: ../ Percent of Population Under 18, lS F^ fr :y j--- 1 • TIMBERLINE DR a Natural •\ J-; Census Block Groups o° -, 6 Area ``. i 8 ,_�; " . ''1i3 t II, ., 12-16% __ /•�`A• -.- MELROSEST $OT[10EU-% .�,..'!i ....n 13 — : '+ _ `�1 Z1'' .,,. 16.01-20% .•1 _.; . , = 26.01-31% sh COUNTRY CLUB RD _•. - - -- ,,., = 31.01-50% ss . ; 5 CRXMry aub Mitwuakie -• - -^ - KRUSE WAY q Ave Essential Service Gap Area GK MEADOWS RD 04 FIR RIDGE RD 10 Gap Area V� SW BONITA RD t+ ^' __.___mot-!�•.i O''' �T cal_ LI S' te Base Map Features �:r i'' OQ • a Al 2 9 �` •• * Schools E Water Bodies • : . e r, .`._.4 J P.• •1 JAKEGROVE AVE sy, E°; ir; •v,e 11 , City Parks and Facilities go- .� 1 6 , Fot,P�ti Non-City Parks and Open Spaces E`' .1..• ra 1 • .i70 O_:rtr�go Lake SOyN r----, y0G°�.,� ;t. ` ;?41.1 --N4:r , �1ce. 1 1 City Boundary 4� ., '%. too ` r r , ."• 4 Ol, _ , ,; t;,�; °��, _ a Metro Urban Growth Boundary ' o s gf; Fe °'', Trails and Pathways ooa ��o1. _- �^� 1 I-I Lake Oswego School District Boundary O 3 CO 1 1 Lr PP 1 sBERcIs RD 7 13 %c 14 ; ♦ rr, [Z" ter./ ♦ I i 1 i Y ♦ '�I O r 11. e.r; ! O i ,.4:1:, ..- - :-• 11 r •('. - u , fir'. 14 OP 5 •`.. ..�' West Linn as 1 "./ :i ry `-tom-..11 ; • •-L. -r - _: , ;,_ , ♦ SqoI Li.}_• '- S% •-• ".f•.. NO� 0 L ,y T� HI LLCST DR Tualatin Rivergrove •q�.. SW NYBERG ST ' 101 b © Ca y Sources: Urban Footprint, 2019 ACS 0 '3 O 0 0.25 0.5 1 Miles 5-Year Estimates, City of Lake LAKE OSWEGO Oswego and Metro RLIS Database, I I I I I I I I PARKS PLAN 2040 2023. Q Q AIIIIIIIIIIII sa MAP 4-7 : 1 '• I 1 - SW STERHENSON Sr 6' Tigard I I ! Portland �+ Populations with a ! . II3 C YERRoKNN Disability ,Rof I (� CFSSFq , , P SW DARTMOUTH sr 1 -�. y .� Y ' ': •• -��' Tryon Creek t••• 5 r; :` r State Percent. of Population with a Disability, ti ✓_ TIMBERLINE DR z Natural Census Block Groups 3 0 .. .1--• a Area + . a •• 8 3 +‘_. Willa• tte } 4 5% to st r i�� 2 ••: .: .� MELREGE ST zo,, a ••:._ .i� ! • •I ! 12 x7CY 5.01 ° {.r .. ." „4. 3t ..,.• 7.01-10% -+ N COUWTRY CLUB RD . ei ` :.••..• 16.01-20% 2 s Milwualcie KRUSE WAY _ • . Essential Service Gap Area a , MEADOWS RD:Pro Gap Area N j ol- SW BONITR RD :•. -- ' - , • Base Map Features ! :a•".: :oo 1.0. ��9 mA.A • i Schools ftb ice•• �"� ,,,M_„�: 4-1.- • . Water Bodies l'o :t_i 3 • ..; .. is •4:... ,,[•E LA,.E�RGVE AVE ME City Parks and Facilities Sh inf:01 .tie s �4+ Non-City Parks and Open Spaces of • •+ I F J i1.1 T'� r1+.1{OFQ �i .ti�i �tipDp' ��+ .c. ` •+ ; City Boundary � • ;• „ 1 ...1r • .. _ _ Metro Urban Growth Boundary #'• ;"•_ • Trails and Pathways I• e • Yg,y� o a �a I� Lake Oswego School District Boundary 1 ` 4 • 4C�SP lam' rc GREENTREE RD 4 • 4s + .1.\ .r Y. n + a B ' -- + SBERGIS RD �.) 7 ..•.� 1;*-ei . .._ ,E JEANVitr" 13 i ......,:.-is... - "1 S.. �. oJERLOOK DR I .„•;. gqr 1�,. � L-I--11?• + ,� ' JJ West Linn0 w+nw+v.• ..• .rr1 .. -�� • .,. .• r""" i :a:,r ...—_,/ -L _Y .r r.S v.: 1i , I yis ;I ... -. ' SgoS ll I3:••-• ...f•-• CHI Los RO ','0D L HILLCREST DR Tualatin Pioetgrove •... ..... I cio.N'/- 5.,SW NYBERG ST j f 1 O F R » f r 'dcro�� L U ? °a o131 El 1 ' a EG -..igar '�- Sources: Urban Footprint, 2019 ACS r LAKE OSWEGO'I O 0 0.25 0.5 1 Miles 5-year estimates, City of Lake Oswego and Metro RLIS Database, PARKS PLAN 2040 2023. Q Q al=1 sa MAP 4-8 : (.----..; L - - SW STEPHENSON ST 6' VP Tigard l - 1 Portland0 Poverty ...:RR I 0 -_-- _. I <PSSeA .---..-.______ e Ank 4.0 SW DARTMOUTH ST �` ° ''� _ '-` Tryon Creek :t;; _ Percent of Population in Poverty, �-Y • • ' State TIMBERLINE DR Natural 0 •�♦ Census Block Groups I _l---`�"" • _- a Area ♦♦ �i ro 8 • • I ,♦ I r ;112 MELROSE ST $01�10E5L1 ilitf--� '.+ . : i.1 -. •ti 2 1'- k-.. • , •aer 1-3°/ l't- . iit ,- ---- g - w . _. • •: 7-10% N!J a COUNTRYCLUB RD : :. . :i . ��-., L = 10-14% kio it 2 Oswego LAke i 5 Co:oc y Mb 5 lYliTw:takie 1 - KRUSE WAY vioof Essential Service Gap Area G :.9 MEADOWS RD 04FlR RIDGE RD10 1 4 r 4 -", :% , Gap Area SW BONITA RD Ir- -..' -- _ C .:.;t- 0�a0 '�►... .. ,f �� vo i �c9 so'� Base Map Features n . a 9 T Schools n_ Water Bodies ' -+ «�e-,�1. {71 WKE GROVE AVE Iu,-. I City Parks and Facilities 1 S< .-- ;.),I :;:-, •,T.. 6 11 �F Asti Non-City Parks and Open Spaces y OS PP I 1.006 3 i, <, - , --N.:' , CW 8 ‘‘1......_�. 1-1 City Boundary 0 ;: °�LHI, _; Metro Urban Growth Boundary I ;` •• o s °' Trails and Pathways -' L Lake Oswego School District Boundary •___ BAY RD c ho ` 5�o� Y Y rc GREENTREE RD .0 _ i 00T? `+,{i._. " Wit] '''' 6"• .� � 4 S BERGIS RD F.`,3-� CI 0/ .Ton n. JEAN RD rm 13 : �(. 1 4 ; ' '• 'r��- 441, OVERLOOK DRdi _ i f1 •, ter'-/I ; i 9 f� L•-a_,.:`. ♦ C.4.. 1/ / .....a ir cr. -ko di tI -.I West Linn 0`�. :, it Nr7-• -_ Gs t..• CHILDS RD ®• 4q0 L HILLCREST DR Tualatin Pivergrove SW NYBERG 5T 1 • ,, M , n a __- ' fib O 4 V v f I,r &rG„, L : e o,' 131 Ell y 4#1111.„....i.... , Sources: Urban Footprint, 2019 ACS r 4 O 0 0.25 0.5 1 Miles LAKE OSWEGO 5-Year Estimates, City of Lake Oswego and Metro RLIS Database, PARKS PLAN 2040 2023. Table 4-2 shows the high percentage equity indicators present within each gap area. Areas with high percentage equity indicators are defined as those with either of the two highest percentage categories present within each equity indicator map, excluding those with very small amounts. For example, in the Communities of Color map (Map 4-3), areas that have a population of color over 15%are defined as an area with a high communities of color percentage. Of the 14 gap areas, three are affected by four or more high percentage equity indictors and have a greater severity of need. As show in Map 4-2,two of the high severity of need gap areas (gap areas 3 and 4) are located on the western side of the city and gap area 14 is located to the east of Highway 43 in the southeastern corner of the city. Table 4-2: Equity Index Youth Population Gap under Population Communities with a Multifamily Poverty Area 18 over 65 of Color Disability Housing sr-. i .'g1 •- -1 .g- • ' y ,. . . • None reas with 5 High Percentage Equity Indicators None reas with 4 High Percentage Equity Indicators 3 4 • • 14 • • • • Areas with 3 High Percentage Equity Indicators 2 • 5 • 7 10 • Areas with 2 High Percentage Equity Indicators 1 • • 6 • • 11 • • 13 • reas with 1 High Percentage Equity Indicators 9 • Areas with 0 High Percentage Equity Indicators 8 12 *Note:Gap areas are not ordered in terms of priority.Areas with high percentage equity indicators were defined as those with either of the two highest percentage categories present within each equity indicator map.Areas with a very small of high equity indicators present were not included. 28 Additional Constraints and Considerations Beyond the access and equity mapping completed for this assessment,there are additional factors that affect the current parks, trails, and natural areas system and will require considerations for the future. Environmental Resources and Climate Resilience Parks and natural areas provide a host of ecosystem benefits beyond supporting opportunities for recreation. These critical functions include the provision of fresh air and water, regulation of climate and stormwater, and the protection of wildlife and biodiversity.The Willamette River, flowing along the eastern edge of Lake Oswego, is a dominant feature of the city's landscape, providing fish and wildlife habitat as well as recreation and transportation opportunities.The area is very scenic, and many properties have views of the river, lake, and nearby Cascade Mountains. Many community members have expressed that they would like to see natural resources protected or enhanced, such as water access,water quality, scenic vistas, urban tree canopy, wildlife habitat, and the regional connections with the surrounding environment.These elements have and will continue to be important considerations in Parks Plan 2040. Wildfire Risk Wildfires occur in Oregon each year. Many of these destructive events threaten life, public health, and property. For that reason, Clackamas County has established fire hazard severity zones to help guide fire risk mitigation efforts as shown in Map 5-1. Lands that are located within these fire hazard areas and the Wildland Urban Interface may be less suited for certain types of park development because of the risks associated with potential wildfire activity. Wildfire mitigation practices should be considered when developing Plan recommendations, especially in areas with high wildfire hazards. The Lake Oswego Natural Areas Habitat Management Plan, adopted in December 2022, includes many site-specific strategies for reducing wildfire in the city's natural areas and will serve as an important guide for developing more general recommendations as part of the Parks Plan 2040 process. Urban Tree Canopy Tree canopies produce stormwater and pollution benefits, provide shade, alleviate the urban heat island effect, and have proven benefits to human health and wellbeing. Rising temperatures associated with climate change are anticipated to drive an even greater need for ecological cooling features in the coming decades. Map 5-2 shows urban tree canopy coverage by neighborhood in Lake Oswego. Future parks and recreation projects should strive to preserve existing tree canopies and increase tree canopy in neighborhoods with less tree coverage. Habitat Connectivity Habitats that are near to or directly connected with other habitats have higher ecosystem value than those that are isolated.This is especially true when they connect to much larger"source" habitats, such as the Cascade or Coast mountain ranges. Lake Oswego's natural areas along the Willamette and Tualatin Rivers are connected (though tenuously)to source habitats in the Cascades and Coast Mountains.The cluster of parks along the southern City boundary (such as Luscher Farm and Canal Acres) link to Tualatin River habitats outside the City. In addition, several of Lake Oswego's parks and natural areas are located near to two large habitat clusters of Tryon Creek State Natural Area (Oregon State Parks) and Mary S.Young Park (City of West Linn). Improving connections to these areas through wildlife or habitat corridors could help enhance ecological health. Minimizing habitat fragmentation and increasing habitat connectivity are objectives of Lake Oswego's Natural Areas Habitat Management Plan and should be considered when drafting recommendations for Parks Plan 2040. 29 Most parks and natural areas in Lake Oswego—even partially developed neighborhood and community parks that include some amount of undeveloped natural area—can serve as important links in larger habitat clusters. Preserving riparian corridors along streams by limiting development and human access to these sensitive habitats creates a safe corridor for wildlife to use as they move through the community. Lake Oswego's Natural Areas Habitat Management Plan (2022) states: "Efforts to minimize habitat fragmentation can create cohesive blocks of habitat that enhance wildlife habitat conditions within natural areas. Protection of these habitat areas may also support efforts to enhance wildlife corridors (existing or planned) between natural area parks." Habitat Clusters based on Metro's Title 13 Resource Inventory are shown in Map 5-3. Transportation Options Public transportation access was not studied as a means to accessing parks,trails, recreation facilities, or natural areas in Lake Oswego due to the limited nature of current service. However, feedback from community engagement to date revealed that lack of service or frequency of service presents a barrier to many residents including youth, seniors, people with disabilities, and other members of the community that do not drive or lack access to a car. In addition, many community members also expressed their desire for more safe walking and biking options to access the parks and recreation facilities near to their homes.The expansion of transit along with other efforts to remove transportation barriers, improve connectivity, and create a multimodal transportation network are critically important aspects of park access. When transit service is expanded in Lake Oswego, access to major parks and facilities that provide access to nature, opportunities for play and gathering, and other human services should be prioritized. Partner Agency Facilities Public school facilities that provide outdoor recreation opportunities were also not incorporated as part of the equitable park and recreation access analysis, although they are shown on the access maps within the non-city parks and open space layer. However, it is important to note that playgrounds and open spaces as part of school facilities are available for residents to use for recreation during times that school is not in session. Future partnerships with the Lake Oswego School District(LOSD) should be explored to identify opportunities for joint-use facilities that can expand equitable access and support community needs and priorities identified by the planning process. In addition to school facilities, there are some parks and open spaces in Lake Oswego that help meet community needs but that are owned or operated by other agencies. Many planned developments provide homeowners association-owned open spaces that may provide access to nature, support trail connectivity, and even offer some play opportunities for children. Some homeowners associations, such as Mountain Park, even provide recreation facilities such as sport courts and an indoor aquatic center. These facilities are intended only for use by residents of the homeowners association and therefore were not considered in this citywide analysis. However,they may reduce the need for city-owned facilities in some of the gap areas identified, in particular areas 4 and 5, which are located partially within the Mountain Park homeowners association area and may be served by those private facilities. Tryon Creek State Natural Area, owned and operated by Oregon State Parks, is also partially located within Lake Oswego city limits, and serves as an important recreational amenity, offering close-to-home access to nature and trail connectivity to several Lake Oswego neighborhoods. 30 Potential Constraints City Charter—Park Development Limitation (Chapter 10) Approved by voters in November 2021, Chapter 10 of the City's Charter mandates that the city preserves fifteen parks Designated Nature as designated nature preserves. Nature preserve is defined Preserves as "natural area parks or open spaces owned by the City of • Bryant Woods Nature Lake Oswego that are managed or maintained to retain Park their natural condition and prevent habitat deterioration." As a designated nature preserve, development is limited to • Canal Acres amenities that facilitate public access such as soft-surface • Cornell Natural Area trails, benches and interpretive displays, and picnic and sanitary facilities. Restricted development includes the • Cooks Butte Park construction of athletic facilities, telecommunication • Glenmorrie Greenway facilities, and parking lots, roads, or trails for motorized vehicles due to their potential for conflict with natural • Hallinan Woods conditions.The cutting of trees is also heavily limited and • Iron Mountain Park no above ground structure that would impair or be inconsistent with the natural conditions of the nature • Kerr Open Space preserve is allowed. All existing facilities, structures, and • Lamont Springs Natural parking lots, roads or trails for motorized trails constructed Area prior to November 2021 are allowed to be maintained as long as the facility does not impair the natural environment. • River Run Although the aim of Chapter 10 is to promote numerous • Southshore Natural Area ecological benefits and preserve public access to the city's natural areas,the development restrictions conflict with • Springbrook Park community priorities related to accessibility and creating • Stevens Meadow recreation opportunities for people experiencing • disabilities. Future discussions will be needed to further West Waluga Park explore the limitations imposed by Chapter 10 of the City's • Woodmont Natural Park Charter and how it could impact the Parks Plan 2040 planning process. 31 MIA a 0' p, MAP 5— 1 •• ' F `j SW STEPHENSON SrST A Tigard Kerr ; 'Y Ti s Natural WILDFIRE _ Portland Area " %, RRPKIyy �• II3 HAZARD F McNary9 <FSS '9qo Park --t_ -- ` 1 SW DARTMO VTHST , ,- ■ ..,7:.' . , ;^: i. Hide-A-Way ;. Li Q 5 a• ?I' ,_ -- •:i '' Pine iParkone Park Tryon Creek .t,s r _ _ __ state ,. I .1 Clackamas County Wildfire Hazards 3 T q ' fir• r +• .t -- TIMBERLINE DR Natural ♦, r Area ♦ LOW Southwood 8 , -, V V Park'' am MODERATE ' : ' Woodmont Stafford `, I� • . `•c':,`1iR �tre ■ LOW TO a°•rncr��`;.. • 1 ' Natural.Park Grove Park �' MELROSE ST - { ,n ... .., lit tr �4Qi River sj, t• 3 - - :a.. '' MODERATE Westlake L ;` Park 1 ' t •., n Adult ;' 111 MODERATE TO HIGH . Communit�j�'•, = HIGH �� : A COUNTRY CLUB RD ;_;; ; Center .. ',Tryon Cove Park Indoor Rossman "~♦ Tennis Park ,i Center Springbrook orw.goLdc. Kincaid Cowday Club Foothills Milwnakie -• KIWSEWgY , Park Curlicue park:qqY£ Corridor Base Map Features G2 MEADOWS RD 04/ RR RIDGE RD - Millenium ' 3 •-, Plaza Roehr A Schools • -- •--- MI ,• .... • Iron Mountain o Sundeleaf Park SW BONITA RD , • .__.___<<__,•,i Pennington Park ec°I % . Water Bodies Plaza , Park % City Parks and Facilities , , :lifer •Vs%% --'5�9�� �� y %'C�rlie ::'" S. Brown s:r i. •'Walu Park a • '+.• Water SportsPGenter Non-City Parks and Open Spaces �.,,•-...� East R Lake Oswego ti Willamette feet, Swim Par River Greenway , .e=• ,� �, Utaluga , City Boundary s� •-• `;. •,;:-„�.• _Park LAKEGRGVEAVE _ Metro Urban Growth Boundary °tad LGeorge Trails and Pathways ,�Ft, ; .`,, of a p� ,a .1; Qoa µG�ti Rogers Pak y i-..a..ti. O 7h-2' t, 5 . al Iri �1 „ aL tc;' L South Shore Hallman • e°q°r�� ' se., �o �'t' S" r '•, a4F8avo Woods r :...... , �� i •+ '..s, . ® • Reservoir j oro+ • • 1 `. , ^l .',< ... ON.. 'LLarnont Springs Y Glenmorrie '," r? Natural Area g Greentree g Greenway '}o`\, ‘• CD san'I lit o Park Park Freepons e--`Q� `�♦ '`..,, V $ GREENTREE RDA ��' W Recreation and Park oa�� Aquatic Center_::..., ,, 4w 1 's �e° COMING SOON! + i•=-� Glenmorrie ,�, m' ° I r-T., , ;,5.4'` 5 g Municipal t Park E Golf Course y i ..� q �+ + 4r�y S BERG'S RD �- L O/ ♦• D % •'.:t. -,JEAN RD Hazelia ir • �° i `. e'+ �7``± , R 1 . •♦ • ' y OVERLOOK D� Field _ ,, , :' . , I S, 0'" li r Luscher Farm f• • ♦, ,'" °ra 1.1 a Park and 4 L V`. % g .1'," Westridge Rassekh Park �_ ,' 1 ' 11 er. Park Cooks M ' Natural Area a ', `F tier.T�• ; Butte Park COMING SOON! c •. , 9 t, •it •*.I �/0,►' a l._. West Linn II3 ■ .f:+^•v-wt. .^v,, Bryant Woods 7•- ff l y -a Stevens if `•Pilkington ^ Nature Park r.-..• Meadow y ti -t. •-Park_ •: =: 1^r I fit: ;_ , • ` s• ,90 E'••-• CanaPAcres cnnos RD al' Sunnyslope Steyr Natural Area Open Spaoe ao I. .. I HILLCREST DR Tualatin Rivergrove 11, ' _ I1�`�'t o River l I ■ J,V SW NYBERG ST I Run Park •1 , =' Ira 13 r - .�,y 'F W. G,P t + �,, o` Sources: Clackamas County Wildfire •f Protection Plan, 2017, City of Lake Oswego and Metro RLIS Database, ■ ( o o!zs 0.5 1 Miles LAKE OSWEGO 2023. I % I I I I I I PARKS PLAN 2040 Date: January 2024. Q Q al=1 F\ON S s iL ps MAP 5-2 : SW STEPHENSON ST 'LA ILI Tigard PortlandNEIGHBORHOOD <eSSFa II3 TREE CANOPY SW DARTMO VTH ST Oak ountain. ` - ,r,_: , a-- ,0. „ Creek Park Q•.._::: 17:, • L .•. 6. g'$° '1•� Lake Oswego Urban Tree Canopy Coverage a ":.: t.�r sr ,; Birdshill :.y TIMBERLIWEDR by Neighborhood (%) .Hi Highlands 3 ' 9 't.viiiamefte 4 0-45% MELROSE ST ` .J I. 1 ♦�+_' River " •_ •..�•4_, 45-50% r t b.._ 50 55% `-. MAD Addition- ;4. Cif Westlake N Holly COUNTRY CLUB RD r' to Forest 60-70% o Orchard iii Oswego L Uplands CoWJiyCZS Mitwuakie KRusE°"A' Foothills1 Base Map Features North Shore o '� MEADOWS RD 44 _Walu•a _ Fl� �DG *OrN ._ _ ERD Country Club �x --; 4 Evergreen I SCh001S , Jr SW BONITA RD rr ___' _,������:• - — - \a° ;` Water Bodies o City Parks and Facilities .,Forest Vc9�� a �, Grove (Lakeview summit Lakewood k •own: Non-City Parks and Open Spaces • L L City Boundary L •_• ; :P:• `.`). 1 LAKE GROVE AVE s ._.;:,1 ;�,� r— Metro Urban Growth Boundary r I ..,fo,::.co, ;; ;; a Trails and Pathways as os vs) ' I I ' oT° n' Oswego Lake SOem 500 a • yG.1, �a t;Tr,II: iiirfOq I r , , -• "_--`7 `a BAY RD o __ ,. ' 2 GREENTREE RD .. LL sa`� Bryant g 0.•- a\ Palisades Glenmorrie 1 IL_�/,3fiiAT�l \ 1 .:L_^ Heron 2 _ SBERGIS RD -�-• % ..:1 ::. JE S,RO '� • ` 7i�-• I OVERLOOK DR ' - 1 --` aa J. • m°t Skylands ', r-- � r t ,. � � . 71 fir• GP ' ' L:r9 Rosewood I i• �] '� L Westrid•e S7�!�'-"'f a -�� Ili - West Linn II3 4. r::..r. ...zti:w ! •- .f l'HO ` .. HI LLOREST DR I Tualatin Rivergrove Childs SW NYBERG ST ,', �j , E. _F -._ __ l7 v NooYr ` a OaEOOA © 13 � - log- _ •-, Sources: Lake Oswego State of the „ O 0 0.25 0.5 1 Miles LAKE OSWEGO Urban Forest Report, December I 2022, City of Lake Oswego and 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 PARKS PLAN 2040 Metro RLIS Database, 2023. S / 1 ►I' •1 , ,, .... , y�,Y -',c- 3 . r J t- ' '4 4 4 MAP 5-3 . _ • 4J ... ...., �• 1 j SW STEpHENSDN ST - Kerr' `M v a x __�at�ra� f HABITAT CLUSTERS ��I' f . Area Portland ��� 4 . ....... .1 ssss !. • ,, , McNary ,•. l / •• t ti: • °00 ,, sty"„ • L Park --t_ y I// 1 7 is • r +� n 1 ti• .4 r � • rq g . a�� 4s _�`—. ` `^' 1 i-. Hide-A-Way , • -- •L E.• k. 1+ e�." }� Pine Cone �• © r v''-.:. �N 111t1''' i •✓' a°°( .._,•�I1^ .=L "` --- Park LL�,• • s �.� �, er/•�‘ a , Park Habitat Cluster l.. r. I r+•� �� h • " I� TIMBERLINE DR G ' - R •r Southwood �:a: '••"'� o 1 Metro Title 13 Habitat Cluster • 'moo Park' ; �° , L Woodmont u ♦. I I Stafford • . ,,, �a71amette Oregon White Oak Patch s L Eti� _ 31 Natural'Park S Grove Park I. �s+ River MELROSE ST .eOZ�C _ ,•- s 1'�� ,o[% Westlake ::. :. y d¢ +�„ a '1•a• A 4" Park Adult Base MapFeatures �}sr �- Comniutilt/ • y �_, • u e°uNTFY C. D ,'1 • _ Center _ ;Tryon lt •' �a Cove Park I 44 a Schools ,Indoor Rosman -". .` s • Tennis Park t Water Bodies Csenter Springbrook Kincaid Foothills "�EQ •,` Park Curlicue i,• CityParks and Facilities +‘Po1EE WAY AAVQ Park �.. Corridor . :I`4 Mrs.: • a :,,:,� t • . Non-City Parks and Open Spaces o ep,1 o��E RD Millenium Y Plaza Roehr + • • Z.... r---- 3 y ;a Iron Mountain • •tL ', CityBoundary SW BONITA� __�__ `•� Pennington ,° Sundeleaf Park . • t,• �'' - Park Park s, Plaza • r a Metro Urban Growth Boundary i t,. •v7 i.`,. !`e �9Sid 9" yi. v flat lie • h • West L y ;_.' 3 etoxf1 lib, Trails and Pathways n,, ; WalugaPark ° Aatet Spot is Center • • • East ake Oswego Willamette 11‘. "T Waluga S>edirn Park yRiver Greenway , :p:= lC•I Park 13YEGR„..E R.'E 40. '' • t • .< George mod• • .. ill 1':r')s ; ',I ov ;,-t`,- Rogers Park S a fi 4.os ' ;; ; l :t;. .� - rrY .v MD : Corr, sr South Shore Hallinan ' _ .41., , v� �1J' , •. + ..�' o Reservoir Woods �.} 01,4 + Glenmorrie, :,+ T iLamont Springs — w Natural Area g Greentree y Greenway ° ilRl• 4o »'ven K �`` y o Park c Apspeln Freepons ;� R�� �,e > .i GREEMTREERD Recreation anti Park ; �• � a� o ... � z%ti " Aquatic Center_ # - ,' ^t 5 • �\^^ • Municipal SOONI ,•_ ' lenmor Lk ,COM I NG �s'' 1. ]}pit. - Park ;Ka • , ii + • .. 3 $ Golf Course i! f # i -.`"'•, r. _ L L __ I :'y.:l_.^ - r� ,s BEMS RD 6-5 r JUIN RD Hazelia ° I c• `s' •♦ • '7•J•. j OVERLOOK DR Field �% 4.4 r,♦ ;.� i y� R44' thL � Lusc her Farm fil".•:. r tI ' i., ik Park and •` I' f i '',,r ' ♦ • o"' Westridge Rassekh Park r' ' .♦ „C.,... er Park Cooks COMING SOON! Natural Area -`, ` `-`r Sri Butte Park r. • aw..sillrt.♦ 1 • 1f 1 �/ ;l 4 .,.nn.•,. •- Bryant Woods __ _ 1 Stevens, e � "'/ • ••.•t-�` !tY I • 8 -., , Pilkington Nature Park r Meadow , • L♦ w t • r L' i L. -Park • 4 /E. •-• Canal•Acres CH LDS pD Sunnyslope // �` s ,— / /1�is- , Natural Area Open Space ��f `• HlucResrER ----Li . atin a �- ' ---�._- _ - I ., k 1 n 1 River � ,� SW WEI .,I - ilik '`- r Run Park Y, - , o . �. 121 El —�.- "h��, - was / i u o • • ilk( • • s Sources: City of Lake Oswego and + ) ' / i a f .� - Metro RLIS Database, 2023. 1.--r / >T* a.' 0.51- • 1 i 1 , LAKE OSWEGO ( j — .- � k1 1• I I , r-- 1.1 PARKS PLAN 2040 Date: January2024. Section 5. Park and Recreation Facility Needs This section identifies relevant benchmarks for the parks and recreation system and identifies needs and potential trends for different types of recreation facilities. Parkland Level of Service Described as a ratio of acres per 1,000 residents, parkland Level of Service (LOS) is a calculation that helps assess whether the City is providing the right amount of parkland acreage and facility counts for its population. A higher parkland LOS means more parkland per resident; a lower parkland LOS means less parkland per resident.The City of Lake Oswego does not currently use a typical level of service ratio for their parks and recreation system and instead relies on an access analysis for its main performance measure. However, benchmarking data is helpful to identify best practices to serve the community. Information on this metric is included here for current and future benchmarking purposes. The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) provides the most comprehensive source of data standards and insights for park and recreation agencies. Comparison of Lake Oswego with NRPA data indicates that while Lake Oswego provides a parkland level of service above the median for jurisdictions of a similar size, the City provides significantly less miles of trails.This is largely due to the fact that trails are located within parks but the off street trail network connecting parks and other key destinations in the city is limited. • ai �- F sS �. ; in & sw 's�r� .�ho. � �, ro 2. Fr 1r �x-xn, R' / 4 �P ,�.r ,y, h� � ��. ,0 � `(s ,'�"`C—� r< ��`� � 4,,,,f,. ...„ � � F ice � '�r1, �' �w�y°� �.rf �p� , - ..,„ ,_-, A. ,:i-,. . -,,, _:_ , . -' ----' y ��'r�--''a•''ak`�-:A.� �� � t ���7 h �� �. L'� '��� 9a® r yt ":�: — l E} n, p 35 Recreation Facility Level of Service The City of Lake Oswego oversees a wide range of facilities and features that they own, manage, and maintain. The School District also provides a number of athletic fields and courts as well as playgrounds, although these are not factored into the access or level of service analysis. NRPA provides benchmark data for common outdoor facilities by population per facility. How Lake Oswego compares to similar sized jurisdictions is shown in Table 5-2 below. While Lake Oswego provides more than the facilities listed in the table, NRPA does not have data for all the facilities Lake Oswego has. For consistency with NRPA metrics and benchmark data, only categories NRPA provides data for are shown. The asterisks in the table denote facilities that are in progress and what the population per facility would be upon completion of those projects. Table 5-1: Po•ulation Per Outdoor Facility Population Per Facility Jurisdictions with Populations City of Lake Oswego Between 20,000 and 49,000 Playgrounds 3,028 2,305 Youth Diamond Fields(baseball/softball) 5,033/9,060 13,833/20,750 Adult Diamond Fields(baseball/softball) 19,556/11,802 8,300/10,375 Basketball Courts 7,117 13,833 Tennis Courts 5,815 4,611 Pickleball Courts 9,257 0 Rectangular Fields(soccer,football) 7,674 5,928 Dog Parks 28,000 20,750 Skate Parks 32,000 41,500* Community Gardens 26,741 20,750 Golf Courses(regulation 18-hole courses) 32,990 0(Renovated Municipal Golf Course has 9 holes)* Source:2020-2022 NRPA Park Metrics Table 5-2: Po•ulation Per Indoor Facilit Population Per Facility Jurisdictions with Populations City of Lake Oswego Between 20,000 and 49,000 Regyms) Centers(including 24,380 20,750* ms Aquatics Centers 31,645 41,500* Community Centers 26,696 0 Senior Centers 31,199 41,500 ■ �-• - 31,645 41,500 !Ilource: 020-2022 NRPA Park Metrics *In Progress Projects 36 '.",-• --,3<tett- .--!:"•..'-'4.-4 • i ": -'-'1i.,0-1, - . e,, 4 % %IS .. i 't --*"..--•• 4.-- `• 1.-"* . xr S 1„E" -4 r`-.! /• se. t . . _ �. rs [R - 'K9•�, -' . ^- -. tea, ,'` �fy f - ...4„ ,.....f _r_... ,.... , ..._ , ... -. -011,-- fil, a tit 5 r i �:+.C.• •"'� �'� �'"us � *-?' a'� , - ::ass;- Y rc Sn `Fi -^. -cY _ , _ tr 1 - r Sty �� . NII it`, - Park and Recreation Facility Needs This section describes facility needs identified through a combination of community engagement and the technical analysis of the park system. It provides relevant trends and potential opportunities for future improvements and enhancements for the following: • Major Facilities • Outdoor Recreation Facilities • Sports Fields and Courts • Playgrounds and Play Areas • Support Amenities 37 Major Facilities The Lake Oswego parks system includes many specialized sites and recreation facilities that serve both the Lake Oswego community and visitors. Several facilities have undergone major renovations in the last several years, ensuring that they continue to provide a high-quality experience. Major facilities include the Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, Indoor Tennis Center, Municipal Golf Course, Swim Park, Charlie S. Brown Water Sports Center, and Luscher Farm.The Lake Oswego Recreation and Aquatic Center(LORAC)will also serve as a major facility once completed and open to the public. Key Needs and Opportunities • The Lake Oswego Recreation and Aquatics Center is expected to be completed in 2024 and will be a significant part of the system with two indoor swimming pools, a recreational gym, multi- purpose group fitness rooms, and additional space for operations. • The proximity of the Municipal Golf Course, Luscher Farm, and the new Recreation and Aquatics Center, along with Hazelia Field and Rassekh Park, will form a hub of activity. • Due to the recent adoption of development code amendments in Clackamas County (ZDO-286), the City now has a path forward to apply to the County to implement some additional elements of the 2013 Luscher Area Master Plan, bring some current activities into compliance with County rules, and improve safety and accessibility for the property's access and parking. In addition, Lake Oswego Parks & Recreation will be seeking input on the future of the community supported agriculture program, which may be welcoming new partners in early 2025. Currently, Luscher Farm supports the community supported agriculture program, community gardens, environmental education programming, farm and natural area maintenance equipment storage, a botanical garden, and farm staff offices. • Lake Oswego Swim Park provides the only public access to Oswego Lake; however, access is limited to the boundary of the swim park parcel and does not offer access to the rest of the lake for swimming, kayaking, or other water activities. There are limited amenities for gathering or relaxing out of the water, and parking is extremely limited, making access and use of the facility challenging especially on warmer days. • Ongoing maintenance will be a continued need to extend the functional lifespan of major facilities. • Fostering public-private partnerships to leverage resources is an opportunity for enabling the development and maintenance of high-quality recreation facilities that meet community needs. Multiple providers can share responsibilities for the operation, maintenance, and programming of recreation spaces to optimize resources and enhance efficiency. • Accessibility improvements are needed in parking and circulation areas at many recreation facilities, as well as ADA accessibility within buildings. • Parking demand management is needed at popular sites and during peak times. • Major facilities should be prioritized for creating new bicycle and pedestrian connections, as well as for serving with public transportation. 38 �:. A s ,ry ' • ` ` . • it `, i, • 41, P 411C.4101, .. - > qii=immillr ..\_,, --"‘'.---.1 ___________ __ r. �. ; - —ems _� t� - +sue r ,,,, sue ��-- 3 fif Trends for Major Recreation Facilities • Multi-use spaces.Designing flexible spaces that can be used for a variety of purposes and accessed by all.This allows for versatility in programming and for recreation providers to adapt to changing trends. • Universal Design.Emphasizing universal design principles to ensure that recreational facilities are accessible to individuals of all abilities,accommodating diverse needs and promoting inclusivity.This includes: o Inclusive fitness equipment:Ensuring inclusivity with adaptive fitness equipment and facilities designed to accommodate individuals with varying abilities,promoting accessibility and diversity in fitness programs. o Accessible Aquatic Facilities:Ensuring swimming pools and aquatic facilities have features like zero-entry access,transfer walls,and accessible lifts to enable individuals with disabilities to enjoy water-based activities. o Accessible Restrooms and Changing Facilities:Providing accessible restroom facilities and changing rooms equipped with appropriate features,including grab bars,changing tables,and sufficient space for wheelchair users. • Climbing Walls.Installation of climbing walls and bouldering areas to cater to the growing popularity of climbing sports and provide a challenging and dynamic recreational option. • Transportation Services.Providing transportation services or partnering with those who do to ensure those going to major facilities have easy access from popular locations like schools,senior living communities,or Downtown.This can include partnering with public transit agencies,shuttle services,or community circulator transit routes. 39 f • • ri 711,,, _t.I,...,.,,t. .....17,:ii:i i.,.;.,, . . ..4:.74,,42,.1:,1:1,,..,:,::-,,.‘,,,\, ,, 4 -‘, * ii' Tie: • • is r • i S 4 . ii .. , • ti"r f I • f m. ,l r Outdoor Recreation Facilities Outdoor recreation facilities encompass a diverse range of spaces. Whether enjoying the thrill of a skate park, nurturing greenery in community gardens, exercising with outdoor fitness equipment, or exploring scenic trails,these spaces contribute to a vibrant and active community lifestyle. Key Needs and Opportunities • Lake Oswego has a limited trail network as trails are typically confined to parks and the city lacks a comprehensive off-street trail network.There is a need for more trail opportunities and connections to and between parks and recreation centers throughout the city. • George Rogers Park, Roehr Park, and Tryon Cove Park provide water access to the Willamette River, although Tryon Cove lacks the infrastructure and support amenities available at the other two. • A "fit spot"with outdoor exercise equipment exists at West Waluga Park although it is nearing its functional lifespan. • There's an opportunity and need to expand access to nature by integrating natural features and thematic or natural play equipment into playgrounds. • Community gardens exist at the Adult Community Center and Luscher Farms, but have limited space to accommodate demand. • A new skate park is being added at Rassekh Park, along with a new play area, picnic shelter, and walking trails. A multi-use athletic field is also planned for future development on the site. • Lake Oswego has five dog parks:two at Hazelia Field and one each at West Waluga Park, Pilkington Park, and McNary Park. Off-leash dog areas and dog parks are popular with the community and there is an expressed need for covered areas at dog parks. • East Waluga Park includes a bike pump track/park, but there is a need for increased maintenance and frequent monitoring for safety issues. There is also a mountain bike course at Sunnyslope Natural Area, however the site currently lacks any formal parking and can only be accessed via an undeveloped gravel County road. 40 Trends for Outdoor Recreation Facilities • Multiuse Trails.Creation of extensive networks of trails that accommodate a variety of recreational activities,including hiking,biking,and trail running. • Waterfront Recreation.Development of waterfront areas for activities like kayaking,canoeing,or paddleboarding,promoting water-based recreational opportunities within park settings. • Water Play.Addition of water features like splash pads,spray grounds,or water pumps to parks provide offer interactive fun for all ages as well as relief from the heat. • Fitness Zones.Integration of outdoor fitness zones with exercise equipment,providing opportunities for individuals of all ages to engage in physical activities and promote a healthy lifestyle. • Outdoor gyms.Establishment of outdoor gyms equipped with fitness stations and exercise equipment, allowing park visitors to engage in strength training and cardiovascular workouts in park settings. • Dog parks.Design and expansion of dog parks with designated areas for off-leash play,small and large breeds,agility courses,and amenities catering to pet owners,promoting a pet-friendly environment. • Nature Trails and Obstacle Courses.Creation of nature trails featuring natural obstacles and fitness stations,offering a blend of hiking,trail running,and obstacle course challenges. • Community Gardens.Implementation of community gardens within parks,providing spaces for residents to grow their own produce,fostering a sense of community,and promoting sustainable practices. • Skate parks.Construction or enhancement of skate parks for skateboarding,rollerblading,and BMX biking. • Outdoor Learning.Integration of facilities that allow for wildlife observation,promote environmental stewardship,and learning through observation points,interactive features,or signage. A4 Y ^ ' 'sar!_:*4y, ' ; .• . :. 4:� bb//"" r is, r .' — iW •"' __ a SV3,10' E :mowII • '•I. r �` ' , a tr s s. 1• a,. �: Q .i { 1l3 Sod it T� i -; s j` _ k 1 ' 4+1. i 1'f.• .. ((.� I•' - l i ' yy�� it. ,. 5 1 {• . , 1 I - -. • 'i.'1 ksII• AL' _ < 11 • 41 111 1111 Sports Fields and Courts Lake Oswego's sports fields and courts are essential components of the recreation system, providing a platform for individuals to engage in organized sports and exercise. Key Needs and Opportunities • The School District is a major provider of sports fields and sports courts in the city.The City does not currently have a formal partnership or joint use agreement with the Lake Oswego School District for athletic field or court use. However,the City and School District are jointly funding the Lake Oswego Recreation and Aquatics Center. Establishing shared facility use agreements between other providers and the City can allow for efficient utilization of existing fields and courts and optimize resources to benefit a broader audience. • Existing City fields are popular and there is an expressed need for more field space or fields available for practice use. • There is a need for field lighting and improved field maintenance to address drainage and field condition during peak season use at LOSD fields. • Athletic organizations frequently use facilities not owned or managed by the City including those in neighboring cities. While shared facility use agreements with other organizations would allow for efficient utilization of existing infrastructure and optimize resources to benefit a broader audience, many nearby cities experience similar field capacity issues. • There is strong interest in adding pickleball courts, particularly for the segment of the population who play pickleball and consistent with the growing popularity of this sport.To minimize noise impacts on surrounding residential uses, any future court will need to have adequate buffering and/or noise reduction features. • There is a need for additional indoor spaces that could alleviate outdoor athletic facility demand, especially during the rainy season or during inclement weather. 42 it lot, rN.-4— a fin. , * � �d III =, 1 bw r. Y 'ry % lax /' a�'. L 11111111 fib; IIIr. !1„ i." i s ir -- - n a glP,t!!fi I P. i ® � 19 ,. iv II e 111-7 Trends for Sports Fields and Courts • Providing Space for New Activities.Designing new courts and fields or adapting existing ones for a greater variety of sports including pickleball,futsal,badminton,and volleyball. • Multi-Use Spaces.Sports fields and courts designed for multi-use purposes,accommodating various sports and recreational activities to maximize usability. • Adding lighting.At larger sites and where there are multiple fields,adding lighting can extend playing hours.Modern field lighting can also limit light pollution for nearby neighbors with DarkSky approved lighting solutions. • Inclusive Design.Increasing focus on inclusive and accessible design,ensuring that sports fields and courts are welcoming to individuals of all abilities,promoting inclusivity in recreational spaces. • Sustainability Initiatives.Integration of eco-friendly elements such as recycled materials,energy- efficient lighting,and environmentally conscious landscaping to align sports facilities with Sustainability trends. • Technology Integration.Incorporation of technology for enhanced user experience,including features like smart lighting,digital scoreboards,and online booking systems for efficient facility management. • Storage Facilities.Adequate storage facilities for sports equipment,ensuring organized and secure storage for items such as balls,nets,and other essential gear. • Smart Maintenance Systems.Utilization of smart technologies for maintenance,including automated irrigation systems,turf monitoring,and predictive maintenance tools,to optimize the condition of sports facilities. rifc Playgrounds and Play Areas Play is an essential service in Lake Oswego. Ranging from traditional playgrounds and equipment to imaginative nature play,these spaces can promote active play, learning, and activity for all ages. Key Needs and Opportunities • While children's play structures exist at 18 city parks, a few neighborhood and community parks do not have play structures (Pilkington Park and Tryon Cove Park). • Children's play areas and structures are provided at many of the schools in the city.These facilities are not open to the public during school hours but generally are publicly available outside of school hours. • There is an opportunity to add nature play within selected natural areas that do not offer any type of play area or equipment. • Many parks have aging play equipment such as the playground in West Waluga.There is also a need to add more play variety, including play equipment intended for different age groups. • There is a need and opportunity to add inclusive play equipment at more play areas around the city, as well as a fully accessible play area. • There is a need for more spaces for older youth, teens, and tweens to gather and safely socialize. 44 Trends for Playgrounds and Play Areas • Destination/Thematic,Nature,and Water Play.Create captivating destination-themed play areas that incorporate elements inspired by nature and water,providing children with immersive and imaginative experiences that stimulate creative play. • Playable Art,Climbable Seat Walls,Hill Slides.Integrate playable art installations and climbable seat walls,along with hill slides,offering a blend of artistic expression and active play opportunities within the park setting. • Dramatic,Imaginative Play Areas with Interpretive and Interactive Elements. Design play areas that spark imagination with dramatic elements,incorporating interpretive and interactive features to engage children in educational and imaginative play experiences. • Universal Design and Accessible Play.Ensure inclusivity by incorporating universal design principles, creating play spaces that are accessible to children of all abilities,fostering a sense of community and equality in recreational activities. • Pop-Up Temporary Play Elements or Play Areas with Moveable Parts.Introduce dynamic and flexible play elements,including pop-up temporary installations or areas with moveable parts,providing ever-changing and novel play opportunities for children. • Game Tables and Elements.Incorporate game tables and elements suitable for social play, encouraging interaction and friendly competition among park-goers in a variety of games. • Topography and Plantings for Places to Hide,Roll,and Tumble.Utilize natural topography and strategic plantings to create spaces where children can hide,roll,and tumble,fostering exploratory play and a connection with the natural environment. • Challenge Play Elements such as Climbing Walls and Ziplines.Integrate adventurous challenge play elements,including climbing walls and ziplines,providing exciting and stimulating activities for children seeking more physically demanding play experiences. • Safe,Accessible,Synthetic or Pour-in-Place Safety Surfacing.Prioritize safety by incorporating accessible and impact-absorbing surfacing options,such as synthetic turf or pour-in-place materials, ensuring a safe environment for children to play. • Sand in Designated Play Areas with Transfer Stations into Sand Play Area.Designate specific play areas for sand play,with transfer stations to accommodate children with mobility challenges, creating an inclusive and enjoyable sand play experience for all. n a t7:."''''•":'4:71-474'Zott.'*':- . . • -,'" • Zfii!',:......' ... •:-.'''.i;'f‘ii 4.ett. _...;,..-1,4.,_,:,:yr... ..-4,,it...,:-,..,4-.110 .::.;:-...:.,,[..,,,,.:-:: ,......,.4„,:: -..-=:.,. :,-.-,‘....,-.7„....;,.,.. „.,., .....::..t......, ., .,..., .,,_,;.-.. : ,,...: ...,.0.01.44,,........ . ,..-:._-i„... .,„: ,,._:- , : ,r,-00 .. . ...:.,..--..,., .....,0,,i-,-4:...:.z.-.. ::: ._ ."$. ... .,,„.„.....:::?4,.17... t„ . ..„,,,..,44. . : „;.,,,,..„_....,., ,,.., ...4.::.. _, .--',ki. -.!•-,-...-1,7:',;, F c ir .. 'All° ' e.lotr.:,;,,' '.., Aft i. r.,�, _�. K _ EC G - - T,.1'_.' -- r .. i ��i 3.::114494. ' ''' Id. .A L :::'''''''...:.'.--. '.... .-.. p IV 'ir s z VAIX*._ sR .:-.• '.At ' �S r s `.q �9- , 'n y,' _, x am . • 45 r rd' fir,`, ''v ,. ¢d s "- r - b cam: �le. AN > , a 3' f ra „ .y, ?, � $ � war u `�' a ",A ILIaI, `i_,i11 Support Amenities Park support amenities play a crucial role in enhancing the overall experience of park visitors by providing comfort and convenience. From benches that offer a resting place for individuals to relax and enjoy the surroundings to lighting that ensures safety and extends the usability of parks beyond daylight hours.These amenities are integral to fostering a welcoming and enjoyable park environment. Key Needs and Opportunities • Regular maintenance and upkeep of support amenities is needed to ensure they remain in good condition. • Some sites do not have enough parking to meet demand and/or overflow of adjacent uses. • There is a need for accessible signage, including signs that convey key information about park sites, as well as interpretive signage that shares information about the natural environment or about Native American or human history. • There is a need for replacement picnic tables in some parks. Some community members have noted that uncovered picnic tables are often not clean or comfortable to sit on after continued weathering/exposure. Overall,there is an expressed need for more covered spaces to sit and hangout in parks year-round. • There is a need for more places to sit in parks, especially along trails, and an opportunity for more seating under covered and/or shaded areas. • There is a need and opportunity to improve public information about parks,trails, amenities, and programs through the development of new community engagement platforms such as a mobile friendly website or app. 46 Trends for Support Amenities • Smart Lighting Solutions.Integration of energy-efficient and sensor-driven lighting systems in park areas for enhanced safety and sustainability,automatically adjusting brightness based on usage patterns. • Creative Shade Structures.Innovative and aesthetically pleasing shade structures,such as solar- powered umbrellas or artistic canopies,providing shelter while adding visual appeal to park spaces. • Multifunctional Seating.Flexible seating arrangements that serve multiple purposes,including movable benches,picnic tables with charging stations,and adaptable seating for various activities and events. • Waterfront Seating Areas.Designing comfortable seating areas along waterfronts,allowing visitors to relax and enjoy the serene views while fostering social interactions. • Green Parking Solutions.Implementation of eco-friendly and permeable parking surfaces, incorporating landscaping and green infrastructure to mitigate environmental impact and improve aesthetics. • Bike-Friendly Amenities.Dedicated bike parking areas,repair stations,and secure bike storage to encourage cycling as a sustainable mode of transportation and promote a bike-friendly environment within parks. • Electric Vehicle Charging Stations.Integration of electric vehicle charging stations to support the growing trend of electric transportation,promoting sustainability and accommodating the needs of electric vehicle users. • Outdoor Workspaces.Designated areas with Wi-Fi connectivity,comfortable seating,and shade, providing outdoor workspaces for remote work or leisure activities that require digital connectivity. • Community Engagement Platforms.Development of digital platforms or apps that facilitate community engagement,allowing park-goers to access information,participate in events,and provide feedback for continuous improvement of park amenities. • Universal Design Principles.Adherence to universal design principles in park support amenities, ensuring accessibility and usability for individuals of all ages,abilities,and backgrounds. • Green Roofs and Living Walls.Implementation of green roofs on shade structures and living walls near seating areas,promoting biodiversity,improving air quality,and enhancing the visual appeal of park spaces. • Community-Driven Amenities.Involving the community in the design and selection of park support amenities,reflecting local preferences and ensuring that the amenities meet the diverse needs of the community. 47 6 x *. �. k ,. t A y .,phiof ki mi LI< �-` 1 � ,...,„ .,.. „it. ... , ...,„_., .„ . .: ,,,..,,,,,,„; . , rliiir , Illt- v i Section 6. Recreation Activity and Service Needs The Lake Oswego Parks & Recreation Department operates out of various recreation facilities, parks, and offsite locations, offering a variety of year-round recreational activities, events, and programs for all ages. Lake Oswego continues to maintain partnerships with community organizations and agencies to provide the community with various benefits and opportunities. With finite resources and areas of expertise, it is essential for the City to continue strengthening and developing mutually beneficial partnerships to best serve the community. Trends and Opportunities Pop-up Park Programming. Pop-up programs allow parks and recreation agencies to take recreation programs and activities to where people are.These initiatives allow for targeted outreach in vulnerable communities, especially those with limited means and access to travel to facilities and/or parks that are located beyond a 10-minute walk from their homes.These types of programs can include arts &crafts, block parties, concerts in the parks, movies in the parks, enrichment activities, sports, and more. Multigenerational Fitness and Wellness Programs. Cities along with parks and recreation agencies are acknowledging a growing public health crisis around conditions like obesity, diabetes, and depression. In response,they are partnering with the health sector to promote preventative healthcare and active living through design, planning, and programming. Departments across the country are offering bikeshare programs, planting trees for shade coverage, and creating more community gardens, all examples of activities that can be enjoyed by multiple generations, collaboratively or separately. Sports Sampling Programs. Parks and recreation agencies are uniquely positioned to offer a sampling of opportunities to expose community members to various things including being one of the top sectors for offering first-time employment opportunities for youth.The NRPA Youth Sports at Park and Recreation Agencies research report states that youth are more likely to remain engaged in sports activities if they have a chance to participate in sports that interest them. Providing a variety of sports sampling opportunities allows youth to explore their interests and form a love for one or more sports that they will likely continue with in some capacity throughout their life. 48 Enhanced Community Engagement.According to the NRPA Park Pulse, nearly 9 in 10 U.S. adults want their local park and recreation agency to take steps to ensure all their community members feel welcome. By enhancing community engagement to better understand the needs and desires of the community, providing all- \ abilities activities, and offering low or no-cost programming, parks and recreation departments can help foster a sense of belonging for its community members.This is especially important to ='" minorities and communities of color. i S Out of School Time Programs. Parks and recreation agencies are ""— -".•ill:/ ! •-7-'1 the leading provider for out-of-school time programs (e.g. camps, afterschool, etc.)which are great opportunities for parks and „ •,. i - r ° recreation agencies to support families, especially those with ' : school-aged children, with organized recreational programs that f1 '{ vs, often take the place of childcare when school is not in session. Program Staffing and Management Lake Oswego reviews and updates its Organizational Chart annually in conjunction with its budget preparation. During the 2021-23 term,the Parks and Recreation department was budgeted at 44.4 Full- time Equivalents (FTE). According to the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA),the median FTE count for communities similar to Lake Oswego is 32.3 FTE with the upper quartile at 67.8, placing Lake Oswego right in between the median and upper quartile. With the LORAC soon coming online, the City will need to ensure staffing levels are adequate to manage and maintain existing facilities at or above current service standards while also ensuring the LORAC is properly staffed and maintained to keep up with the community's demand and internal operational goals. Lake Oswego Parks& Recreation worked with Ballard*King to complete an operational analysis for the center in 2022.This analysis identified staffing and maintenance needs, program pricing, and other key operational elements for the new center. .� • aye- . - ar � �� �, N 49 Key Needs Free or Subsidized Programming While public parks and recreation providers typically provide free or low-cost recreation options, some community members have indicated,through engagement activities, that the cost of activities can be a barrier to participation, especially for lower income community members. For example,those who rent their home in Lake Oswego have a disproportionately lower income relative to homeowners and pay 30% more of the household income on rent. It is important to consider methods to create awareness about and further enhance the City's scholarship program to provide more subsidies to individuals within the community. At present,the scholarship program only affords up to $200-per individual, per fiscal year, with a $500 maximum per family. With the average cost of a youth camp program at around $200, per session (typically a weeklong session)that significantly limits opportunities for families with one or more children seeking recreational opportunities during times when school is not in session. While it is not feasible to provide completely free programming as the primary service model, it is important to offer a variety of opportunities that are free for the benefit of the community. Costs can be offset through community partnerships,fundraising, and grants, to name a few. Intergenerational Programming Intergenerational programming is an often-overlooked opportunity for parks and recreation agencies though it is a key component in creating healthy,thriving communities.These types of programs are designed to include the use of activity spaces and/or campuses whereby youth, teens, and adults, can enjoy recreational programs and activities simultaneously or collaboratively.The integration of the LORAC into Lake Oswego's parks and recreation system provides a great opportunity to introduce targeted intergenerational recreation programs, activities, and events.The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA), in conjunction with Generations United, provides great resources that can assist communities with developing and sustaining intergenerational programming and activities. Accessible Programming The City of Lake Oswego has limited opportunities and support for individuals with disabilities to actively engage in recreational activities and programs. Community members would like to see more accessible physical spaces and programming within Lake Oswego to better meet their needs. Despite the ability to request an accommodation for participation, community members have indicated a need for advanced and more detailed event, activity, and trail information specifically pertaining to accessible parking, restrooms, seating, and the type of ground surfacing at the activity locations.Strengthening and/or establishing partnerships between the City and the Lake Oswego School District Student Services Department, Clackamas County Disability Support Services, and various community groups can help enhance opportunities and support. Furthermore,the City may consider developing a more robust adaptive recreation program by hiring additional staff who specialize in working with individuals with disabilities, including but not limited to a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) who can work collaboratively with the current ADA Coordinator. 50 Section 7. Moving Forward There are numerous opportunities and potential directions for the parks and recreation system to grow. In some cases, similarities between various opportunities and needs combine to build a compelling case for moving specific projects forward. In others, needs may be articulated in the form of a policy or long- term action when funding, partnerships, or additional input and refinement are needed.This also means striking the right balance between ensuring existing parks, facilities, and programming are maintained at the high-quality level the community enjoys while seeking to strategically add to the system. The Community Advisory Committee and Parks, Recreation, and Natural Resources Advisory Board will review both opportunities and needs to help identify key direction for recommendations developed in the following stage of the planning process. P- YT ' ' 'IMP " ..:':''.• W -;>t- -?yam^ gyp�y:�:-'q. _ 43144—" 'fit 4'. : e '.4: •,z';.,`. -4136 ‘44111111111111 ; - ,'ALL '':.- >h . �.:4�'t,: VI'.;"r9i•y. +`.,P1G's . . '�a. •'�}-.���;!° f:x:: �,. � 40 �s;�* g r -�, is �.� •�.�.3 40:\ L. '. 1 ; 1 1.. .. '..• ..;ifit;'1,114.9.;1:17'.:14.° ' 1.: V"•4411::" iMr'' 'trit:: Fy414 4.1, -'.,.'!6'1. ,' A 0414''''r.-,'..?,3'... r.t'4,- , ''Ilk' -ii.-?et '''' -, .. sue' :Y'Q sue 'a' 7....- +ti..�: :f;