Skip to Main Content
City Manager Banner

Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake - Video & Guides

City of Lake Oswego Oregon Official Website

The Cascadia Subduction Zone represents the single largest hazard to the people and built environment of Oregon. Earthquakes on the Cascadia Subduction Zone can be over 9.0 magnitude and have a region-wide impact.

Check out these presentations and guides to better understand this hazard and prepare and protect your family, home and business.

  • Presentation/Video
    • Impacts of the Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake
    • Surviving A 9.0: Lessons Learned From Japan And Beyond
    • Oregon Field Guide's Unprepared
  • Guide
    • Earthquake Safety Guide for Homeowners
    • Reducing the Risks of Nonstructural Earthquake Damage

Oregon Field Guide's "Unprepared"

OPB’s Oregon Field Guide spent a year-and-a-half making a special presentation titled “Unprepared.” First aired on October 1, 2015, Unprepared takes an in-depth look at the status of Oregon’s preparedness for a major earthquake. Watch this informative video at www.opb.org/unprepared.

The Impacts of the Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake on Oregon
presentation by Dr. Althea Rizzo, Office Of Emergency Management

While most people know that California gets frequent earthquakes, they may not know that Oregon is at risk from very large earthquakes.  These earthquakes on the Cascadia Subduction Zone can be over 9.0 magnitude and have a region-wide impact. The Cascadia Subduction Zone represents the single largest hazard to the people and built environment of Oregon. On April 9, 2015, Dr. Althea Rizzo, the Geological Hazard Program Coordinator at the Oregon Office of Emergency Management, covered the latest understanding on the natural hazard and its expected impact on Oregon.

Video:  Cascadia Subduction Zone featuring Dr. Althea Rizzo, April 9, 2015

Download PDF of April 9, 2015 presentation

Surviving A 9.0: Lessons Learned From Japan And Beyond
How do they apply to a sustainable Lake Oswego?
presentation by geotechnical engineer Allison Pyrch and Jan Castle, Lake Oswego Sustainability Network

On May 14, 2015, geotechnical engineer Allison Pyrch shared her experiences as part of an engineering delegation that travelled to Japan following its 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in March 2011. Areas that were not inundated by the tsunami recovered quite rapidly.  What did it do to prepare? Can we apply it to Lake Oswego to insure that we not only survive and recover, but thrive, after the Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake which we are expecting?

Jan Castle, Lake Oswego Sustainability Network, also reported on the state of Lake Oswego’s infrastructure and what needs to be done to make it more resilient.

Video:  Surviving A 9.0: Lessons Learned From Japan And Beyond, May 14, 2015

Download PDF of May 14, 2015 presentation

Structural and Non-Structural Preparation

Proper earthquake preparation of your home or building can save lives, reduce injuries and reduce property damage.

Here are some guides that will help you reduce potential damage.

Earthquake Safety Guide for Homeowners

As a homeowner, you can significantly reduce damage to your home by fixing a number of known and common weaknesses. This booklet is a good start to begin strengthening your home against earthquake damage. It describes common weaknesses that can result in your home being damaged by earthquakes, and steps you can take to correct these weaknesses.

Reducing the Risks of Nonstructural Earthquake Damage - A Practical Guide

This document explains the sources of nonstructural earthquake damage and provides information on effective methods for reducing risk associated with this damage. Nonstructural components of a building include all of those components that are not part of the structural system; that is, all of the architectural, mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems, as well as furniture, fixtures, equipment, and contents. Windows, partitions, granite veneer, piping, ceilings, air conditioning ducts and equipment, elevators, computer and hospital equipment, file cabinets, and retail merchandise are all examples of nonstructural components that are vulnerable to earthquake damage.