Library of Things!

Click on the picture of a thing to place a hold on it!

Azul Game


Food Dehydrator
 


GoPro Camera
 


Digital Camera
 

Sewing Machine

 


Ukelele

 


LEGO Set

 


Brio Toy Train

 

Snap Circuits

 

Magna-Tiles

 

Duplo Blocks

 

Garden Tools

 

Catan Game

 

Pandemic Game

 

Candy Land Game

 

Ice Cream Maker

 

Juicer

Karaoke Machine

Theremini

 


VHS/DVD
Converter



Elmo Cake Pan

Bundt Pan


Bird Watching Kit


Instant Pot

What do food dehydrators, GoPro cameras, and ukuleles have in common?  The answer:  Lake Oswego residents will be able to borrow them from the Library beginning September 23.
 

We are joining a growing number of libraries in providing community access to a “Library of Things” collection: an array of non-standard but useful items available for checkout, ranging from seasonal cake pans to sewing machines to VHS-to-DVD converters.  Click the clipboard icon for the list of items!

Lake Oswego’s collection of “things” is being curated from results of a public survey conducted earlier this year.  Overall, survey results showed that LO residents are interested in a wide variety of things, but the highest-ranking categories were Arts & Crafts, Technology, and Outdoor & Recreation. 

“We are launching the collection with 25 unique items, but plan to add up to 100 unique items to complete the collection over the next twelve months, including things for children such as train sets and snap circuits,” said Melissa Kelly, director at Lake Oswego Library.  “Staff are excited to provide access to a new collection of materials that inspire life-long learning, encourage human connection, and level the playing field for people without the budget or space to own the technology or equipment themselves.”

A Library of Things also promotes sustainable communities. Rather than purchase a food dehydrator that a household might use only once per year, it can be borrowed seasonally from the Library.  Or rather than purchase the newest gadget based on reviews alone, why not try it out first?

“The things we buy cost far more than the price on the tag,” said Stacy Ludington with the Clackamas County Sustainability and Solid Waste program, which provided start-up grant funding to Lake Oswego and other county libraries for this project. “Land, water, fossil fuels and more are used to produce the items we buy, leading to environmental costs we often don’t think about. Sharing items helps to reduce this environmental impact.” 

All you need is a library card to borrow from the collection.  Don’t have one?  It’s easy and free for residents of Clackamas, Washington and Multnomah counties. Just call or visit the Library for details.

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