Resources

WATCH

A Glimpse Into Yosemite's Chinese History
Ranger Yenyen Chan explores the role Chinese immigrants played in the early years of Yosemite National Park. 

Beyond Chinatown: Uncovering Oregon’s Rural Chinese History
This talk highlights the recent archaeological work and findings of the Oregon Chinese Diaspora Project (OCDP), a multi-agency partnership that has been excavating sites across the state in order to better understand and share the history of Oregon's early Chinese residents. With a focus on rural communities, remote mining camps, and railroad construction, this collaborative project has provided important insight into the Chinese experience and role in the settlement and development of Oregon. Presented by Chelsea Rose.

Hidden Histories: Past Programs
A series of programs recorded by Portland Chinatown Museum on various topics related to Chinese heritage in Oregon.  

Oregon Experience: Kim Wah Chung
In the late 1800s, thousands of Chinese miners came to Eastern Oregon in search of gold. Among them were two men - Ing "Doc" Hay and Lung On - who opened a store and herbal apothecary called Kam Wah Chung. Though originally catering to their fellow Chinese, over time these two men attended to the medical needs of many, becoming highly regarded members of the community.

American Experience: The Chinese Exclusion Act
Examine the origin, history and impact of the 1882 law that made it illegal for Chinese workers to come to America and for Chinese nationals already here ever to become U.S. citizens. The first in a long line of acts targeting the Chinese for exclusion, it remained in force for more than 60 years.

Asian Americans
Asian Americans is a five-hour film series that delivers a bold, fresh perspective on a history that matters today, more than ever. As America becomes more diverse, and more divided, while facing unimaginable challenges, how do we move forward together? Told through intimate and personal lives, the series will cast a new lens on U.S. history and the ongoing role that Asian Americans have played in shaping the nation’s story.

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Facing Up to the Racist Legacy of America’s Immigration Laws
Opinion piece by Reece Jones. Mr. Jones has researched immigration for more than 20 years and is the author of “White Borders: The History of Race and Immigration in the United States From Chinese Exclusion to the Border Wall,” from which this essay is adapted.

The Chinese Question by Mae Ngai
How Chinese migration to the world’s goldfields upended global power and economics and forged modern conceptions of race. Read an interview with the author via Public Books or watch an interview by Oregon Humanities.

White Borders: The History of Race and Immigration in the United States from Chinese Exclusion to the Border Wall by Reece Jones
The first book to show that immigration laws in the US have always been motivated by racial exclusion and the desire to save the idea of a white America. University of Hawaii interview with author Reece Jones.  

Books by Erika Lee
One of the nation’s leading immigration and Asian American historians, Erika Lee teaches American history at the University of Minnesota. The granddaughter of Chinese immigrants, Lee grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, attended Tufts University, and received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. She was recently elected into the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, testified before Congress during its historic hearings on discrimination and violence against Asian Americans, was awarded an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship, (also known as the nation’s “brainy award,”) and named President-Elect of the Organization of American Historians. Lee is the author of four award-winning books in U.S. immigration and Asian American history. Washington Post Live with Erika Lee and Helen Zia (3/8/21)  

LISTEN

Portland Chinatown Oral Histories
Chinatown Live! aims to expand public access to the interpretive power of Portland Chinatown elders’ oral histories, so that audiences of all ages and backgrounds can learn from and engage with Oregon’s Chinese American history and heritage.