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IMMP Draft Goal and Guideline Comments

Please review the draft Goals and Guidelines for the Iron Mountain Resource Management Plan Below. Provide any comments you may have and we will review them and integrate ideas in the draft management plan.

GOALS

Management goals provide focus for managing restoration and stabilization efforts. A management plan has several basic goals. The following are the five goals for the Iron Mountain Management Plan.

Goal: Stabilize and restore Iron Mountain Park’s forest, hydrologic and wildlife systems to a predominantly healthy balanced  state.

Goal: Reduce Iron Mountain Park’s fire hazard within the region to protect the natural resource and for public health and safety.

Goal: Increase the park’s stewardship efficiency when it comes to maintenance, public safety, restoration and stabilization activities.

Goal: Invest in educational opportunities (such as signage, regulatory and interpretive), appropriate recreational opportunities, and public safety while protecting the park’s natural resources.

Goal: Maintain a balance of habitat protection and public recreational use.
 

GUIDELINES

Guidelines provide direction and focus when determining what priority is placed on restoration and stabilization projects. Guidelines are utilized to provide long term clarity and direction.

Guideline: Protect existing areas that have been stabilized and restored.
To successfully utilize and maximize limited resources we must protect past efforts in lieu of restoring new areas. If past efforts are not maintained then all of the resources (time, labor and money) that have been invested are lost. To be fiscally cognizant, continued focus must be given to these areas. (This priority takes precedent unless endangered attributes are discovered and a shift in resources is necessary to protect rare and endangered attributes of the park or significant safety concerns develop).

Guideline: Invest in areas of particular significance or that pose safety concerns.
When additional resources are available, efforts should concentrate on areas that have a particular significance such as:
• high fire risk
• sensitive species
• dense populations of native species
• higher levels of probable restoration success
• when stabilized/restored have additional benefits for example: if an area is restored it will protect sensitive species, provide enhanced habitat, can be used for interpretive/ educational examples, or reduce maintenance/restoration efforts (increase efficiency).

Guideline: Focus on projects that provide multiple benefits, maximizing effectiveness of community resources.
Projects that if implemented, will add to or expand restoration activities, or increase efficiencies, such as maintenance, should be a priority. It is important to look at all opportunities and their ability to leverage additional benefits.

Guideline: Develop partnerships and utilize programs that provide assistance for restoration, stabilization and maintenance.
To continue restoration, stabilization and maintenance efforts the Department needs to look beyond existing general fund support. Although support from the general fund is welcomed leveraging additional community support will be helpful in supplementing existing efforts. Utilize programs and partnerships such as Clackamas County Fuels Reduction Funds, and the Friends of Iron Mountain. When seeking assistance opportunities will need to be complementary and not have a negative effect on current resources unless the long term gain outweighs the initial investment.

Guideline: Leverage educational and interpretive opportunities throughout the Park.
An important element for Iron Mountain Park and its stabilization/restoration will be education and interpretive opportunities. To stabilize/restore the park will require more than just labor and financial resources. An educational element will be instrumental in engaging the community. To protect existing and enhance future stabilization/restoration efforts the educational elements will need to inspire as well as educate visitors. The inspiration and education can come from interpretive/ educational signage that complement tangible work that has occurred. To increase park users’ understanding and assist on shared goals for restoration, interpretive signage with highlights of the natural area as well as opportunities for service should be provided.
 

 

GOALS
Management goals provide focus for managing restoration and stabilization efforts. A management plan has several basic goals. The following are the five goals for the Iron Mountain Management Plan.

Goal: Stabilize and restore Iron Mountain Park’s forest, hydrologic and wildlife systems to a predominantly healthy balanced  state.

Goal: Reduce Iron Mountain Park’s fire hazard within the region to protect the natural resource and for public health and safety.

Goal: Increase the park’s stewardship efficiency when it comes to maintenance, public safety, restoration and stabilization activities.

Goal: Invest in educational opportunities (such as signage, regulatory and interpretive), appropriate recreational opportunities, and public safety while protecting the park’s natural resources.

Goal: Maintain a balance of habitat protection and public recreational use.

GUIDELINES
Guidelines provide direction and focus when determining what priority is placed on restoration and stabilization projects. Guidelines are utilized to provide long term clarity and direction.

Guideline: Protect existing areas that have been stabilized and restored.
To successfully utilize and maximize limited resources we must protect past efforts in lieu of restoring new areas. If past efforts are not maintained then all of the resources (time, labor and money) that have been invested are lost. To be fiscally cognizant, continued focus must be given to these areas. (This priority takes precedent unless endangered attributes are discovered and a shift in resources is necessary to protect rare and endangered attributes of the park or significant safety concerns develop).

Guideline: Invest in areas of particular significance or that pose safety concerns.
When additional resources are available, efforts should concentrate on areas that have a particular significance such as:
• high fire risk
• sensitive species
• dense populations of native species
• higher levels of probable restoration success
• when stabilized/restored have additional benefits for example: if an area is restored it will protect sensitive species, provide enhanced habitat, can be used for interpretive/ educational examples, or reduce maintenance/restoration efforts (increase efficiency).

Guideline: Focus on projects that provide multiple benefits, maximizing effectiveness of community resources.
Projects that if implemented, will add to or expand restoration activities, or increase efficiencies, such as maintenance, should be a priority. It is important to look at all opportunities and their ability to leverage additional benefits.

Guideline: Develop partnerships and utilize programs that provide assistance for restoration, stabilization and maintenance.
To continue restoration, stabilization and maintenance efforts the Department needs to look beyond existing general fund support. Although support from the general fund is welcomed leveraging additional community support will be helpful in supplementing existing efforts. Utilize programs and partnerships such as Clackamas County Fuels Reduction Funds, and the Friends of Iron Mountain. When seeking assistance opportunities will need to be complementary and not have a negative effect on current resources unless the long term gain outweighs the initial investment.

Guideline: Leverage educational and interpretive opportunities throughout the Park.
An important element for Iron Mountain Park and its stabilization/restoration will be education and interpretive opportunities. To stabilize/restore the park will require more than just labor and financial resources. An educational element will be instrumental in engaging the community. To protect existing and enhance future stabilization/restoration efforts the educational elements will need to inspire as well as educate visitors. The inspiration and education can come from interpretive/ educational signage that complement tangible work that has occurred. To increase park users’ understanding and assist on shared goals for restoration, interpretive signage with highlights of the natural area as well as opportunities for service should be provided.